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290 comments

Why? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559623)

What was interesting to me is that it took 2 years just to get 100 domains on-line.
Why is that interesting? I'm not even sure if this 'internet' thing is going to catch on ...

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559947)

I think because Microsoft is not in the list. Would there be any other reason to post something like this to /.?

Symbolics ... (5, Informative)

foobsr (693224) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559629)

... here is some pictures of a symbolics (those with the first domasin) machine for those who cannot imagine ...

http://home.hakuhale.net/rbc/symbolics/20041113/20041113.html [hakuhale.net]

CC.

Re:Symbolics ... (4, Informative)

rs79 (71822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559879)

Symbolics wasn't actually first, DEC was. Brian Reid registered it in January (and still has the datestamped mail from the Internic) but they screwed up the dates in whois.

Mitre.org was the fitst domain registered.

Re:Symbolics ... (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560019)

That also caught my eye. Given that Symbolics was a workstation vendor (as opposed to, say, Sun's "Network is the Computer" schtik) I would have expected them to be in the '87 second-tier like Apple.

Another registration that caught my eye:

PRIME.COM
March 4 1987


Doctor: "It's a PRIME Computer! The most sophisticated computer ever!"
Rommana: "Ask it what to do with a woman Doctor."
PRIME: "MARRY HER"
Doctor: "Oh-"
Rommana: "Clever PRIME"
Doctor: "You can say that again..."
Rommana: "Clever PRIME"

Mine isn't on there (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559637)

I registered sex.com in 1974 but someone stole it from me. Now I live on dog meat sausages.

Sincerely

Baldemar W. Gulghammer

I remember when.... (4, Interesting)

superid (46543) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559639)

One of my very first introductions to enterprise networking and internet was back in about 1988. I was friends with the admin of a Vax cluster at a progressive little company. He had printed out "the host table" that he downloaded each night. It probably wasn't more than 80 or 100 sheets of fanfold greenbar. I remember browsing it a bit and the only two that I can remember were burlingtoncoatfactory.com and lucasarts.com (or was it lucasfilms?)

anyway....get off my lawn!

Re:I remember when.... (5, Funny)

Selfbain (624722) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559681)

You know the problem with people who have been around technology for a long time is when they go senile, their babble will change but most people probably won't be able to tell the difference.

Re:I remember when.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559843)

So what's the problem?

Re:I remember when.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559955)

You know, the problem with people who haven't been around technology for long enough is when some old timer recounts a story and they treat it and the person as if they're insane. Still, most of 'em think their ideas are new. Bless.

Re:I remember when.... (3, Funny)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560201)

You know the problem with people who have been around technology for a long time is when they go senile, their babble will change but most people probably won't be able to tell the difference

Why you young insensitive clod, I'm gonna sma.....ZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzz whut?

Re:I remember when.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560127)

and lucasarts.com (or was it lucasfilms?)
Back then, it would have been LucasGames (or "LucasFilm Games"). It didn't become LucasArts until the 90s.

Internet connections (3, Interesting)

stoney27 (36372) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559655)

Yea it took two years, but these where internet connections. Most companies where not thinking about connecting there computers to the outside world unless they where doing some research or involved with networking in some way. There was not let's put out our "Marketing message on the Internet", most of it was he we where working with this in School and we could use this technology to share information or for sending email.

-S

Re:Internet connections (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559667)

I suspect that most of these companies are on the list because they were engaged as defense contractors at the time.

Re:Internet connections (2, Insightful)

jcorno (889560) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559717)

It looks like they went in groups, too. IBM, Sun, Intel, and TI all in one day. 3Com, Tandy, Unisys, and AMD on another. It probably wasn't an individual decision for each company. It'd be too much of a coincidence.

Re:Internet connections (2, Informative)

jcorno (889560) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559739)

That wasn't entirely true. It was IBM-Sun, then Intel-TI. That actually still makes sense. AMD was on a different day from the other three, though. That's what I get for not double-checking before posting.

Re:Internet connections (4, Insightful)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559807)

It's not like they went to the Yahoo! Small Business website and registered the domains on their credit cards for $7.99.

Whoever was maintaining the canonical copy of the hosts file had plenty of other stuff to do, this was just a minor chore for them. So it's reasonable to think that updates would get bunched up and made whenever he happened to have some free time.

Let's keep things in context (3, Informative)

north.coaster (136450) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560313)

Remember that this took place during the time frame of the transition from a research oriented network (the ARPANET) to a larger, more production oriented network. The World Wide Web in it's current form had not even been invented yet. The creation of the .com domain was driven by a technical requirement to switch to a hierarchical based system, replacing a flat name space. The first step was to adopt the temporary .arpa domain name. Most companies then switched from the .arpa domain to the .com domain when their technical staff was ready to make the transition.

In other words, registering for a .com domain was an administrative necessity for the relatively small number of companies that were connected to the DARPA Internet at that time. It was not a business decision.

Putting this in context, during this same time frame lot of universities were connected to a different network, called CSNET. BITNET was also very active during this period. Although there were interconnections between the DARPA Internet, CSNET, and BITNET, each was a truly independent network. A lot of companies with Unix installations were on UUCP (which did not use a domain based name system).

Considering the market segments that companies like Microsoft were involved with in the mid 1980's, it should not surprise anyone that they were not among the first to register for .com domains. It would not have made any sense for them to do so.

First virtual real-estate goldrush (2, Interesting)

lobiusmoop (305328) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559671)

The registering and selling-on of domain names in the mid-to-late 90's made some serious money for a few brave entrepreneurs. sex.com [wikipedia.org] is the classic case, although early domain-name squatting on big business names brought in easy bucks for some.

And here's the ironic bit about all of this... (1)

Tipa (881911) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559839)

The page the link brings you to is full of ads for domain squatters, including a big picture one at the bottom for "Domain Fool", which "brings you domain names at foolish discounts!"

So, they tried to figure out what domain names you might want, BOUGHT THEM from under you for pennies, and now are trying to sell them back to you for piles of money...

"Hey, new mothers! After you have your baby, we're gonna take it, then sell it back to you for a FOOLISH DISCOUNT! Woo woo!"

This was the 80s (4, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559673)

1985, first domain. I'm fairly sure a few posting here weren't even born, most of the rest had other things on their mind than DNS problems (my main concerns was that I was going to a different school then and had to find new friends).

The internet was but a dream. It was something that a few research companies, some universities and maybe even the ARPA cared about. Nobody had internet at home. If anything, we had modems to dial into BBSs.

Does it make sense to register a COM domain? As in Commercial?

Some companies realized that this will be the future (and I'm honestly surprised to see Siemens on the list, they must've had better and more visionary people in their upper echelons back then), and they registered their trademark as a com domain rather than fighting a lengthy battle with domain grabbers as many have done later. Cisco and a few others on the list make sense, since they are pretty tightly coupled with the success of the internet, being more or less networking companies.

But, bluntly, why should any flower shop or manufacturer of beer bottles register "his" domain in the 80s? It was hardly their topic, and hardly any sensible way to sell their goods without an audience willing and able to buy via the net.

Re:This was the 80s (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559737)

Yeah, talk about "other concerns". I began elementary school in the fall of 1985 (around here, and in those days, the school year started in late september).

Re:This was the 80s (2, Informative)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559835)

Back in those days there was a widespread belief (correct or not) that the internet could not be use for commercial purposes (the main argument being the US government's funding of the backbone). Sure, there was a "COM" TLD, but that was really just a basket for outfits that didn't fall into one of the main TLDs: GOV (government agencies), NET (infrastructure providers), EDU (colleges), ORG (non-profits), and MIL (military). If a commercial entity wanted on the net, they were welcome, but the assumption among most netizens at the time was that they were doing it to participate in the net's non-commercial activities.

Re:This was the 80s (3, Interesting)

ajs (35943) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560101)

1985, first domain.
Which is kind of odd, since, by 1987 when I got to college, just about every technical company and University that I had regular dealings with had a domain name. It goes to show how fast it scaled.

Does it make sense to register a COM domain? As in Commercial?
Actually, in the beginning, ".com" was a dumping ground for those commercial organizations that were considered "just barely worthy." The perception was that the Internet was for the .mil and .edu crowd who were the founders of the Apranet. .com was created for those companies that wanted to be able to do business with the Internet-savvy types in the universities and military via email or offer ftp access to software updates and the like. There was no real sense that .com was for commercial exploitation of the Net.

But, bluntly, why should any flower shop or manufacturer of beer bottles register "his" domain in the 80s? It was hardly their topic, and hardly any sensible way to sell their goods without an audience willing and able to buy via the net.
And really, they should not have. They had no business (I mean that literally) using the Internet of that day. In the 90s, with the advent of the Web, everything changed. But remember that the Net predates the Web, and back in those days it wasn't really a place that flower shops could have gotten anything from.

Re:This was the 80s (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560229)

You sir lose. .com was an all purpose domain for COMmon domains. It had nothing to do with commerce. .net for ISPs and NETwork infrastructure, .org for non-profit ORGanizations, .edu for EDUcational institutions, .gov for GOVernment stuff, and .mil for MILitary domains. Country codes came later, I think .us is really under the same or similar rules as .gov.

Remember your history. The Internet came about as a means to share information between Universities and governments. The commecial use of the Internet came much later.

SCO before Microsoft (2, Insightful)

UnanimousCoward (9841) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559689)

I wonder when Microsoft finally got on board? Damn, I shoulda squatted!!!

Re:SCO before Microsoft (1)

alexhs (877055) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559935)

Yes, I also found funny that while IBM, Sun, Apple, Adobe all made in that list, our visionary Bill Gates and his "road ahead" failed to be there.

But I guess there was a MICROS~1 on a SMB/NetBIOS domain controller on an IPX/SPX network all along ;)

Re:SCO before Microsoft (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560189)

But I guess there was a MICROS~1 on a SMB/NetBIOS domain controller on an IPX/SPX network all along ;)

Actually, Microsoft probably hooked up their Xenix [wikipedia.org] machines to the Internet for better inter-company and company-university communications. Believe it or not, Microsoft couldn't really run itself on DOS machines at the time. Xenix was used to provide the various networked services (like email) necessary for day-to-day operations.

Re:SCO before Microsoft (1)

blackjackshellac (849713) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560145)

Microsoft was "just" starting to realize that people were networking computers in 1986/87. Ahhh, those were the days. It was so blissfully quiet on the Internet back in the day. It was bliss, I tell ya, pure bliss.

Symbolics! (1)

JBMcB (73720) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559703)

Wow, Symbolics was ahead of the curve. Too bad their hardware cost and arm and a leg.

I don't remember the fist web site I visited - but I remember it was using Lynx. I used gopher all the time, though. Turbogopher ran a lot better on the Mac LC3s at the University computer lab than the pre-beta of Mosaic.

Re:Symbolics! (1)

SCHecklerX (229973) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559811)

webex on OS/2 here. Gopher, of course, before that. Actually, my first experience with gopher was on Penn State's mainframe, as was my first experience with usenet and FTP servers.

Re:Symbolics! (1)

Richthofen80 (412488) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560055)

I remember Gopher. I used to be part of a BBS in Boston called Argus, which later my membership got 'sold' as Argus went tits up. The new BBS, Channel One, was touting its 'internet accessibility'. I went into local Channel One chat rooms to figure out just what the hell the internet was. Someone pointed me to the Gopher, IRC and FTP utilities through the BBS. Thought it was okay. The problem was service discovery, which was pretty weak back then. You sort of had to know what you were looking for.

There was also a WWW portal later. You'd minimize whatever terminal software you were using and use WinSock to get your browser working.

the meaning of TLDS (4, Insightful)

cliffski (65094) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559723)

I'm sure when the net was young that .orgs had to be non profit, and .nets were ISPs, but all of that seems to have totally disappeared. I also think its a bit sad that we have .co.uk and so on, but nobody used any .us or .usa names. .com became the default URL that you had to have, with everything else being cheap and forgettable. People can tell my site is UK site and that I'm a UK company, but US companies are completely invisible, with the rush for everyone to be dotcom. I'm sure a lot of UK customers are automatically pleasantly disposed towards my company when they realise I'm a bit 'local' to them, but the same thing isn't an option in the US.
Given the ubiquity of bookmarks, hyperlinks and google, do we even need catchy domain names any more? I might have paid over the odds many years ago to get an easily remembered one, but now? who cares, people will find you with google anyway right?

Re:the meaning of TLDS (1)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559837)

I'm sure a lot of UK customers are automatically pleasantly disposed towards my company when they realise I'm a bit 'local' to them, but the same thing isn't an option in the US
Sure it is, the yanks just use .com. ;-)

Re:the meaning of TLDS (1)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560041)

I might have paid over the odds many years ago to get an easily remembered one, but now? who cares, people will find you with google anyway right?

"I need a new basketball. I know! I'll order it from that sports site I went to a few months ago, they were pretty cool. Damn, I didn't bookmark it. What was it... qwomnx.com, something stupid like that. Ah well, I'll Google for 'sports', I'm sure it'll turn up."

.org was always a catch-all (5, Informative)

Cadre (11051) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560065)

I'm sure when the net was young that .orgs had to be non profit

.org was not created for non-profit organizations, it was originally created as a catch-all for organizations that didn't meet the requirements for the other gTLDs. PIR's History Page [pir.org], RFC 920 [ietf.org], RFC 1591 [ietf.org]

Hmm what's missing? (0, Redundant)

Pontiac (135778) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559741)

Wow 2 years and not one person thought to register a porn site?
What am I thinking.. it's 1987.. ASCII porn never really caught on.

Re:Hmm what's missing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559851)

That's nothing. First 2 years and microsoft.com is not registered! That is very telling.

How much did it cost? (2)

suso (153703) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559759)

Just curious, anyone know how much it cost to register a domain back at the beginning?

Re:How much did it cost? (1)

Pontiac (135778) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559813)

I don't know about 1987 but in 95 it was $100 for 2 years

I found this on Wikipedia.. It says the same price was in effect in 1985

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.com [wikipedia.org]

Re:How much did it cost? (2, Informative)

Salamander (33735) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559871)

Read it again; that was 1995, not 1985. Domains were free for a long time.

In 1995 the NSF authorized NSI to begin charging registrants (of .org and .net as well as .com) an annual fee, for the first-time since its inception.
(The grammar error is the responsibility of the wikidork who made the entry.) I wasn't in early enough to get a domain for free, but I do have one for which I paid a one-time fee.

Re:How much did it cost? (1)

Matt_Bennett (79107) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560173)

Nothing until the beginning of August, 1995- a friend registered hazmat.com for me at the end of July, 1995 (and it was free). Tried to register the .net, but at that point, you couldn't register a .net unless you were an infrastructure provider.

Re:How much did it cost? (2, Informative)

ThreeGigs (239452) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559887)

It was free at the very beginning. Mostly because it was all handwritten on paper then typed into a text file. Registering went something like "Hey Jack, can ya write me into the hosts file?"

Re:How much did it cost? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560161)

There was an electronic form, a text file you'd download from sri-nic.arpa (later nic.ddn.mil), fill in the blanks and email back to sri-nic.

For all that, it wasn't all that far removed from "Hey Jack".

Re:How much did it cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559979)

$0. Zip. Butkus. Absolutely free of charge. Back in the day, SRI-NIC (the original central registrar) did not levy any charge for domain registration.

Re:How much did it cost? (3, Informative)

RevWaldo (1186281) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560279)

Not so much a cost issue but up until the mid-90's the PITA factor was a major hit in setting up a domain. No hosting services, so you'd need your own server. Private lines were way expensive and difficult to get set up with the phone company. No DSL so you'd need ISDN (56k! Wicked fast!) or bone up for a T1 or partial T1 which could run you $1000/month easy. Not to mention all the paperwork you'd have to submit to interNIC, etc. The best revenge on all the domain squatting is that all the "now a household word" domains use words no one would think were valuable - yahoo, google, etc ad infinitum. Have you had a need to visit computer.com? telephone.com? television.com?

Where's the last bunch? (4, Funny)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559761)

This 'first 100 .com' stuff is all nice and dandy, but what I want to see is the LAST one hundred .com domains.

Re:Where's the last bunch? (2, Funny)

NoSuchGuy (308510) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559933)

but what I want to see is the LAST one hundred .com domains.

Why? Do you need more V1@grA?

Checklist... (5, Funny)

Dan East (318230) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559797)

Excerpt from checklist for when I get my time machine working:

#10: Visit 1985 and buy up all 18,252 .COM domain names consisting of 2 and 3 letters.

Dan East

Re:Checklist... (1)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560007)

Excerpt from checklist for when I get my time machine working:
There was a story in Analog (back in the '80s, iirc) about an author with a time machine who went back to the late fifties and made a name writing political fiction ("Watergate") and near-term sci-fi ("Apollo 13"). There was also a book ("Rewind"? "Replay"?) in which a person writes blockbuster screenplays by stealing all of Spielberg's scripts.

Me, I'd just buy stock in select companies and invest the winnings in politicians just starting their political careers.

OMG -- Tandy! (1)

ciaohound (118419) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559825)

1985 -- I was in my freshman year of college, with high hopes and fond memories (not) of my high school computer math and statistics class, in which we sat in front of TRS-80's networked to a printer. Every day our class president would write a little basic program to print "(teacher's name) is a dick" over and over. The teacher would notice that the printer was running and would dutifully walk over to it, examine the output, and say "Heyyyyy.... ummmm," and that's when the class president would restart his machine to destroy the evidence. Good times. My, how networking and the high school tech experience has changed.

Toad.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21559827)

I saw toad.com on the list, and was wondering if Dave Troy of Atari lore was the guy who first registered that domain. He and Jennifer were ahead of the curve on many counts, so it wouldn't surprise me.

I was worried there for a second... (1)

Jasin Natael (14968) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559855)

I was worried until my conscious mind had the time to process the fact that TimeCube [timecube.com] != Datacube [datacube.com].
I think we should all be glad that TimeCube took much longer to arrive.

Fanboyism (4, Funny)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559865)

Apple is there
Microsoft is not

Re:Fanboyism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560045)

In 1985 Microsoft was a relatively small company focused on application development. They were 1/14th the size of Apple then.

Re:Fanboyism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560137)

I wouldn't even say 1/14th...Apple was already pumping out Apple II's in the late 70s/early 80s. Woz was even throwing millions into the US festival by late 1982.

Commercial traffic and the early internet (1)

Cherveny (647444) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559875)

One reason why it may of taken a while for commercial sites to become more common on the Internet, was, in the 1980s, there was a strong bias against ANY form of commercial message on the net expressed by many people. Posting a message on UseNET that even came close to an ad could easily get you emailbombed those days. (hard to think of these days, with UseNET so full of spam these days.)

Re:Commercial traffic and the early internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560059)

One reason why it may of taken a while...

may HAVE! It may HAVE taken a while. Sorry for the grammar flame, but that one just really bothers me.

Rough X-mas Shopping (1)

poormanjoe (889634) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559877)

Unless you were in the market for a B-2 Stealth bomber [wikipedia.org]
In which case the Northrop Grumman Corporation [wikipedia.org] had a monopoly on the holiday shopping season.

Re:Rough X-mas Shopping (1)

syrinx (106469) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559941)

Unless you were in the market for a B-2 Stealth bomber
In which case the Northrop Grumman Corporation had a monopoly on the holiday shopping season.


Of course in 1985 it was just Northrop, they hadn't merged with Grumman yet. (Also the B-2 wasn't ready until 1989, so you would have had to take a raincheck.)

Re:Rough X-mas Shopping (2, Informative)

poormanjoe (889634) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560199)

From the wiki:
An estimated US$23 billion were secretly spent for research and development on the B-2 in the 1980s. An additional expense was caused by changing its role in 1985 from a high-altitude bomber to a low-altitude bomber, which required a major redesign. B-2 in flight over the Mississippi River (St. Louis, Missouri) with the Gateway Arch and Busch Stadium in the background.The first B-2 was publicly displayed on 22 November 1988, when it was rolled out of its hangar at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California, where it was built. Its first public flight was on 17 July 1989.

So after 23 billion secretly spent dollers you think the American public was the first to see what had been built the day before? Unless you worked on the project, you cannot say when it was "ready" It's probly wasnt ready until the communists figured out what we had built, and it was then obsolete.

And some sites still have 80's design (3, Informative)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559901)

Like John Gilmore's [toad.com] site.

Simple and to the point.

BTW this is the guy who can't fly because he refuses to get a government issued ID. Interesting stuff.

More Interesting.... (2, Funny)

JeremyGNJ (1102465) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559949)

I think it would be more interesting to see the "First 100 dot com's that were sold for big money"

Bad Business Hours? (1)

Trintech (1137007) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559951)

I find it kind of odd that so many of these domains were registered on the same date. Was the registering office only open once a week or was the internet so new and scary that the companies went in groups?

Talk about the old days... (1)

lseltzer (311306) | more than 6 years ago | (#21559985)

The administrative contact for the oldest name, symbolics.com, has a Compuserve e-mail address.

Stargate? (0)

Steve S (35346) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560009)

The Stargate movie came out in 1994 according to IMDB, yet in the first 100 domain names I find:
stargate.com
pyramid.com
vortex.com
portal.com
rosetta.com

Neat.

Re:Stargate? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560267)

Not the movie. Stargate was a project that transmitted a USENET feed via satellite (in the vertical blanking interval on WTBS, actually - ah, Night Tracks, we hardly knew ye).

Pyramid was a hardware manufacturer, Vortex was (is) Lauren Weinstein's consulting company (I believe), Portal was an early (arguably the first) commercial USENET provider, and Rosetta was (is) Scott Warren's consulting company.

Re:Stargate? (1)

DeionXxX (261398) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560277)

I also wandered around this. I wonder if it was in reference to a "Star Gate" which seems like pretty obvious reference to many SciFi novels, or does the word "Stargate" refer to a specific SciFi story.

Did anyone happen to visit Stargate.com before the movie???

Looks like Stargate.com is now a Co-location company in Chicago.

Re:Stargate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560285)

They used a black hole to go back in time to register.

ccTLD? (1)

kalirion (728907) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560051)

From TFA: The first top level domains were COM, ORG, EDU, GOV, MIL and ccTLD.

This seems to imply the possibility of a domain named 'whatever.cctld'. They should have just come out and listed the ccTLDs available at the beginning (UK, SU, etc.)

What about .ARPA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21560061)

Before all this junk, wasn't there was a top level domain called .ARPA? There were gateways from ARPAnet to other nets such as BITNET and so on...

Re:What about .ARPA (1)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560245)

"Before all this junk, wasn't there was a top level domain called .ARPA?"

There *is* an .arpa TLD still today. I don't know if it currently holds anything but in-addr.arpa, but it surely exists.

Yeay Bellcore! (1)

LuisAnaya (865769) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560097)

Number 10! Of course, now it redirects to Telcordia. I knew that Bellcore was of the first ones, but never imagined to be number 10. I could've imagine Bell Labs and AT&T to register earlier. Oh well, those were the days...

.com-to-.com email forbidden (2, Interesting)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560107)

Keep in mind that in those days the Internet was not supposed to be used for commercial purposes.

In those days, .com's were only supposed to be on the net as a convenience for fostering research collaboration between them and their .edu partners.

In theory, it was OK to send email from a .edu to a .edu, from a .edu to a .com it had a research relationship with, or from a .com to a .edu it had a research relationship, but .com's were not supposed to exchange email directly.

Coincidence ? (3, Interesting)

nsebban (513339) | more than 6 years ago | (#21560247)

In March 1986, it's interesting to see that HP, Bell, IBM, SUN, Intel and TI registered their domain during the same month. IBM and SUN, but also Intel and TI got theirs on the exact same day.
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