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Chinese Moon Photo Doctored, Crater Moved

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 6 years ago | from the publicity-stunts dept.

Space 272

mytrip writes "A controversy over last week's photo of the lunar surface, allegedly from China's lunar spacecraft Chang'e, appears to be resolved. It's real but it isn't. An expert says the photo's resolution shows that it is of recent origin. However, for some inexplicable reason, someone on Earth edited the photo and moved a crater to a different location. 'In the week since the picture was released amid much fanfare in Beijing, there have been widespread rumors that the photo was a fake, copied from an old picture collected by a U.S. space probe. The photo from China's Chang'e 1 orbiter is clearly a higher-resolution view, with sunlight streaming from the northwest rather than the north. The mission's chief scientist, Ouyang Ziyuan, told the Beijing News that a new crater had been spotted on the Chang'e imagery — a crater that didn't appear on the US imagery. Lakdawalla determined that the crater in question wasn't exactly new — instead, it appeared to be a crater that had been moved from one spot on the picture to another spot slightly south.'"

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272 comments

That's not a moon (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590301)

It's a space station.

Re:That's not a moon (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590339)

A few years ago, while browsing around the moon, I
had to take a piss. As I entered the john a big beautiful chink,
about twenty-five, came out of one of the booths.
I stood at the urinal looking at him out of the corner of my eye as he
washed his hands. He didn't once look at me. He was "straight" and
married - and in any case I was sure I wouldn't have a chance with
him.

As soon as he left I darted into the booth he'd vacated,
hoping there might be a lingering smell of shit and even a seat still
warm from his sturdy young ass. I found not only the smell but the
shit itself. He'd forgotten to flush. And what a treasure he had left
behind. Three or four beautiful specimens floated in the bowl. It
apparently had been a fairly dry, constipated shit, for all were fat,
stiff, and ruggedly textured. The real prize was a great feast of turd
- a nine inch gastrointestinal triumph as thick as a man's wrist.

I knelt before the bowl, inhaling the rich brown fragrance and
wondered if I should obey the impulse building up inside me. I'd
always been a heavy rimmer and had lapped up more than one little
clump of shit, but that had been just an inevitable part of eating ass
and not an end in itself. Of course I'd had jerk-off fantasies of
devouring great loads of it (what rimmer hasn't), but I had never done
it. Now, here I was, confronted with the most beautiful five-pound
turd I'd ever feasted my eyes on, a sausage fit to star in any fantasy
and one I knew to have been hatched from the asshole of the world's
handsomest young stud.

Why not? I plucked it from the bowl, holding it with both
hands to keep it from breaking. I lifted it to my nose. It smelled
like rich, ripe limburger (horrid, but thrilling), yet had the
consistency of cheddar. What is cheese anyway but milk turning to shit
without the benefit of a digestive tract?

I gave it a lick and found that it tasted better then it
smelled. I've found since then that shit nearly almost does.

I hesitated no longer. I shoved the fucking thing as far into
my mouth as I could get it and sucked on it like a big brown cock,
beating my meat like a madman. I wanted to completely engulf it and
bit off a large chunk, flooding my mouth with the intense, bittersweet
flavor. To my delight I found that while the water in the bowl had
chilled the outside of the turd, it was still warm inside. As I chewed
I discovered that it was filled with hard little bits of something I
soon identified as peanuts. He hadn't chewed them carefully and they'd
passed through his body virtually unchanged. I ate it greedily,
sending lump after peanutty lump sliding scratchily down my throat. My
only regret was the donor of this feast wasn't there to wash it down
with his piss.

I soon reached a terrific climax. I caught my cum in the
cupped palm of my hand and drank it down. Believe me, there is no more
delightful combination of flavors than the hot sweetness of cum with
the rich bitterness of shit.

Afterwards I was sorry that I hadn't made it last longer. But
then I realized that I still had a lot of fun in store for me. There
was still a clutch of virile turds left in the bowl. I tenderly fished
them out, rolled them into my handkerchief, and stashed them in my
briefcase. In the week to come I found all kinds of ways to eat the
shit without bolting it right down. Once eaten it's gone forever
unless you want to filch it third hand out of your own asshole. Not an
unreasonable recourse in moments of desperation or simple boredom.

I stored the turds in the refrigerator when I was not using
them but within a week they were all gone. The last one I held in my
mouth without chewing, letting it slowly dissolve. I had liquid shit
trickling down my throat for nearly four hours. I must have had six
orgasms in the process.

I often think of that lovely young chinaman dropping solid gold out
of his sweet, yellow asshole every day, never knowing what joy it could,
and at least once did, bring to a grateful shiteater.

Tag this story 'Claters' (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590667)

N/T

Coverup! (5, Funny)

spun (1352) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590321)

They moved it to cover up the obelisk!

Re:Coverup! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590375)

No, it was moved to cover up the "Made in Taiwan" sticker.

Who will pay the ultimate price? (0, Troll)

dollar99 (922389) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591087)

It seems that when a shameful act or incident is exposed in China a high ranking official has to commit hari cari. I wonder if the mission's chief scientist, Ouyang Ziyuan, is going to have to chop his guts out. Yuck!

Re: Coverup! (2, Interesting)

Jeremy_Bee (1064620) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591209)

On the same topic ... all these trips to the moon by other nations could settle the "UFO watched Apollo 11 Astronauts" theory once and for all.

There is a particularly nutty conspiracy theory that says there was a landed UFO parked off to one side of the Apollo 11 landing site, and that the astronauts were being "watched" the whole time.

Given that Luna has no air to speak of, the big round dent it presumably would have left in the moondust should still be visible if Japan/China/India wants to fly over that way and take some hi-res snaps. :-D

Soviet China (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590323)

In Soviet China, Crater Moves You!

Well, now... (4, Funny)

xENoLocO (773565) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590327)

... who on earth would do such a thing?

Re:Well, now... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590823)

Pride goeth before a fall. They should have checked more carefully before trumpeting their success. That egg on the face is mixed with Krazy Glue.

Re:Well, now... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590855)

Let's say you were born in China. You're an only child. You have two parents and four grandparents doting on you. Sometimes they even call you a spoiled little emperor.

They instill in you the legacy of Confucianism, especially the values of hierarchy and hard work. They send you off to school. You learn that it takes phenomenal feats of memorization to learn the Chinese characters. You become shaped by China's intense human capital policies.

You quickly understand what a visitor understands after dozens of conversations: that today's China is a society obsessed with talent, and that the Chinese ruling elite recruits talent the way the N.B.A. does -- rigorously, ruthless, in a completely elitist manner.

As you rise in school, you see that to get into an elite university, you need to ace the exams given at the end of your senior year. Chinese students have been taking exams like this for more than 1,000 years.

The exams don't reward all mental skills. They reward the ability to work hard and memorize things. Your adolescence is oriented around those exams -- the cram seminars, the hours of preparation.

Roughly nine million students take the tests each year. The top 1 percent will go to the elite universities. Some of the others will go to second-tier schools, at best. These unfortunates will find that, while their career prospects aren't permanently foreclosed, the odds of great success are diminished. Suicide rates at these schools are high, as students come to feel they have failed their parents.

But you succeed. You ace the exams and get into Peking University. You treat your professors like gods and know that if you earn good grades you can join the Communist Party. Westerners think the Communist Party still has something to do with political ideology. You know there is no political philosophy in China except prosperity. The Communist Party is basically a gigantic Skull and Bones. It is one of the social networks its members use to build wealth together.

You are truly a golden child, because you succeed in university as well. You have a number of opportunities. You could get a job at an American multinational, learn capitalist skills and then come back and become an entrepreneur. But you decide to enter government service, which is less risky and gives you chances to get rich (under the table) and serve the nation.

In one sense, your choice doesn't matter. Whether you are in business or government, you will be members of the same corpocracy. In the West, there are tensions between government and business elites. In China, these elites are part of the same social web, cooperating for mutual enrichment.

Your life is governed by the rules of the corpocracy. Teamwork is highly valued. There are no real ideological rivalries, but different social networks compete for power and wealth. And the system does reward talent. The wonderfully named Organization Department selects people who have proven their administrative competence. You work hard. You help administer provinces. You serve as an executive at state-owned enterprises in steel and communications. You rise quickly.

When you talk to Americans, you find that they have all these weird notions about Chinese communism. You try to tell them that China isn't a communist country anymore. It's got a different system: meritocratic paternalism. You joke: Imagine the Ivy League taking over the shell of the Communist Party and deciding not to change the name. Imagine the Harvard Alumni Association with an army.

This is a government of talents, you tell your American friends. It rules society the way a wise father rules the family. There is some consultation with citizens, but mostly members of the guardian class decide for themselves what will serve the greater good.

The meritocratic corpocracy absorbs rival power bases. Once it seemed that economic growth would create an independent middle class, but now it is clear that the affluent parts of society have been assimilated into the state/enterprise establishment. Once there were students lobbying for democracy, but now they are content with economic freedom and opportunity.

The corpocracy doesn't stand still. Its members are quick to admit China's weaknesses and quick to embrace modernizing reforms (so long as the reforms never challenge the political order).

Most of all, you believe, educated paternalism has delivered the goods. China is booming. Hundreds of millions rise out of poverty. There are malls in Shanghai richer than any American counterpart. Office towers shoot up, and the Audis clog the roads.

You feel pride in what the corpocracy has achieved and now expect it to lead China's next stage of modernization -- the transition from a manufacturing economy to a service economy. But in the back of your mind you wonder: Perhaps it's simply impossible for a top-down memorization-based elite to organize a flexible, innovative information economy, no matter how brilliant its members are.

That's a thought you don't like to dwell on in the middle of the night.

spoiler alert (5, Informative)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590329)

SPOILER: It was a poor stitch/blend job.

Bad summary (5, Insightful)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590453)

"Doctored" suggests deliberate fiddling with the data to mislead.

It seems here that this is actually just a result of a vanilla screw-up.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity". Though instead of "stupidity" I'd substitute "error".

Re:Bad summary (1)

Radon360 (951529) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590621)

Though instead of "stupidity" I'd substitute "error".

How about a mistake made while caught up in the exuberance of the moment?

Re:Bad summary (4, Funny)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590809)

Like forgetting to put on a condom?

Sure, even the most diligent scientists can forget correct procedure when caught up in euphoria or other pressures.

Re:Bad summary (1)

grumpyman (849537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591033)

Thanks for spotting this out. I'm not sure wtf is wrong with /. editors and a lot of the submitters that post apparent flame-bait and anti-Chinese propaganda when they seize the chance.

Re:spoiler alert (5, Interesting)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590819)

Maybe someone could explain to me the implication in the article that the data is scientifically useless. If it's just a bad stitch job done back here on Earth it would seem they would still have the original data and could reperform the stitch no? Even if they don't all the data between the stitches is still good which I would imagine is probably what the real researchers use anyway.

Re:spoiler alert (2, Informative)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590927)

The image as currently released by China is scientifically useless, since there are known errors within it. If a new image were to be released that was known to be done correctly, then it could potentially be scientifically useful.

Feng Shui (4, Funny)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590331)

probably a feng shui thing.

Re:Feng Shui (-1, Offtopic)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590683)

Another retarded comment. I don't see how americans claim to be supporter of Taiwan yet continue to diss their culture time and again. You are targeting the wrong group with your joke. China is the one today that hates fungshui. Their government bans it. Is like pointing fingers at Christians and laughing at Allah.

Re:Feng Shui (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590813)

>> pointing fingers at Christians and laughing at Allah

Stupid Budhists and their snake handling.

Re:Feng Shui (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590859)

I dont know. I'm a Realtor in Monterrey Park (in LA County) in a predominately asian area. I hate to say this, but I really dislike working with Chinese clients because of their belief in Feng Shui. About 3 out of every 4 of my Chinese clients require a home that is in harmony with "Feng Shui", so that it will help them become richer.

Even MGM Grand hotel in Las Vegas had to rebuild its entrance on the strip due to a Feng Shui belief of Chinese Gamblers [wikipedia.org] that the mouth of a Lion is bad luck. Many Chinese entered MGM through its back entrance, while most avoided the MGM altogether.

Re:Feng Shui (1)

c_woolley (905087) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590883)

"I don't see how americans claim to be supporter of Taiwan yet continue to diss their culture time and again."

Perhaps leaving Taiwan to be absorbed by the Chinese would clear this up for you...Also, since people from all over the world visit/comment on this site, why make the "retarded comment" about this being an American? I am not American...but I also don't care if China bans Feng Shui.

On to the OP, I don't think China deliberately doctored the image. As many have already stated, it looks like they got caught up in the moment and made a mistake.

Re:Feng Shui (5, Insightful)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591091)

Here's the issue - your sense of humor is broken. Retardation is not funny - but my joke is.

Let's hit wikipedia real quick: Today's Feng Shui schools teach that it is the ancient Chinese practice of placement and arrangement of space to achieve harmony with the environment. [wikipedia.org] Fen Shui originated in China. The picture came from China. See the connection? That my statement is absurd is what makes it funny. That Feng Shui would be banned by the Chinese government makes the joke that much funnier. This does not 'diss' (why do you diss english with this lame slang?) Taiwanese culture in the least. Taiwan doesn't even enter the picture - unless you are running around with some kind of chip on your shoulder.

Oh and as far as our supporting Taiwan - I personally took part in operations like this [canada.com] that have been a part of Taiwan remaining free from Chinese control. But I'm wandering now - the issue is your inability to get a joke. Pointing fingers at Christians and laughing at Allah could be funny too in the right context.

maybe just a watermark (4, Insightful)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590363)

Haven't cartographers been known to put little errors like this in on purpose so they can tell if someone has copied their map? Still seems pretty silly to do it with such scientific data, but we know that China has no qualms manipulating any other kind of information.

Re:maybe just a watermark (5, Interesting)

prelelat (201821) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590457)

If it isn't an obvious photoshop who's to say that the US didn't manipulate their original so that they would know if someone else was using their pictures instead of making their own. I could see the U.S. doing this to see if a government said they had technology that they did not.

Re:maybe just a watermark (1)

CryptoLogica (463378) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590893)

I'm more inclined to believe its China doing it in order to make claims that fall in line with previous statements, how good would they look if they say 'we will do 'X' by 2007' and internally they hear 'we can't do 'X' by 200*... *click* BLAM!...*thump*' .... 'We did 'X'... See how great we are!"

Photoshop is easier than a real space program, and always successful... Soviets were no better

Communists think alike, my little red book says so.

Good Day,
Juggernaut

Re:maybe just a watermark (1, Interesting)

Yahma (1004476) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590715)

The Chinese government have been doctoring photos [jiyuu-shikan.org] for political reasons at least since the 1940's.

Re:maybe just a watermark (4, Informative)

HungWeiLo (250320) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591129)

jiyuu-shikan.org is a well-known Japanese history revisionist website. No better than Holocaust deniers.

The best evidence they could come up with for the baby picture was "the photographer laughed" and "the guy carrying some baby walked towards the rail tracks".

Bad Astonomy (5, Informative)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590379)

Bad Astonomy [badastronomy.com] readers are already up to date. It's an error in composition of the picture [badastronomy.com] . Nothing less, nothing more.

Re:Bad Astonomy (0)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590493)

error in composition
Wow. Thank you. That nullifies the entire article. This should be the only +5 comment in the thread, and everything else should be modded to -1 (including this post).

Re:Bad Astonomy (1)

Brett Buck (811747) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590585)

Except it doesn't appear to be a correct analysis. I can easily see the difference in the lighting and composition, but there still appears to be an extra/moved crater in the Chinese photo. It could well be that it's a real thing (a genuine new crater) but the original article could be correct as well.

      Brett

Re:Bad Astonomy (4, Informative)

Kelson (129150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591035)

Except it doesn't appear to be a correct analysis. I can easily see the difference in the lighting and composition, but there still appears to be an extra/moved crater in the Chinese photo.

Two issues:

  1. Is it copied?
  2. What's up with the new crater?

The analysis concluded that it's not copied, and concluded that the moved crater can be explained [planetary.org] by a mistake stitching the components together. If you look at that article, you'll note that the new image is missing a small crater in one place, and has an extra small crater a little ways away, and there's an odd indentation around it. She figured out where the seam probably was, shifted the parts a bit, and they line up perfectly.

Supports not nullifies (3, Informative)

benhocking (724439) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590607)

That supports the article; it doesn't nullify it. In fact, Bad Astronomy gave them credit for figuring it out. (The summary could have explained this a little better, but what's new?)

Re:Bad Astonomy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590743)

Well, I've only got 4 mod points, but I'll start with yours. . .

Trouble with the Chinese moon missions (4, Funny)

wcrowe (94389) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590385)

The main difference between Chinese and American moon missions: 30 minutes after the Chinese have explored the moon, they feel like exploring it again.

Re:Trouble with the Chinese moon missions (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590677)

I thought that was the problem with 18-year-olds' moon missions.

Great. Now I have to keep my wife from talking to her Chinese friends, or I'm going to have to deal with *yet another* comparative inadequacy.

Houston, we have goldfarmers. (1)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590801)

Fortunately it's too far for them to camp, and they havent figured out that there is no loot on the moon(save for the US mission).

Sorry, we had to. (1)

Bender Unit 22 (216955) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590387)

We had an agreement that they would not build anything in that crater, and yet it was lighted up like a christmas tree. It should have been a clean pass for the cameras dammit.

Space Domination (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590391)

I'm convinced they have a base on the moon.

Pay attention to me! HELLO! (0)

madjake (1028854) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590409)

Maybe they just feel neglected because their cool achievements aren't as fanatically received as they had hoped. :(

just habit (1)

wardk (3037) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590411)

the chinese need to alter absolutely everything to conform to some ideological thingamjig, what this would be conforming to isn't real clear

so it's probably just a case of them doing it 'out of habit'

or maybe they were hiding Iran's nukes from our glorious leader's intelligence services

Chinese knockoffs (4, Funny)

Zouden (232738) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590427)

The US version looks way more realistic.

The real problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590863)

is all the mercury and lead on the original photo. Lick it and die.

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590429)

I for one welcome our Moon based crator moving overlords.

or perhaps it was ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590435)

a copyright trap?

TFA (4, Informative)

sporkme (983186) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590437)

Lakdawalla found that a mistake was apparently made in stitching together the 19 strips of imagery to produce the finished picture - and that Chinese officials unknowingly pointed out that mistake as they defended the photo's veracity.
Not a fake, not an intentional edit, and a moronic blunder in trying to prove authenticity.

Can the small crater be from a recent collision (0, Redundant)

andy314159pi (787550) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590447)

Couldn't the additional small crater seen in the Chinese photo be from an asteroid collision that occurred after the Clementine picture was taken?

Re:Can the small crater be from a recent collision (4, Funny)

Alsee (515537) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590519)

Couldn't the additional small crater seen in the Chinese photo be from an asteroid collision that occurred after the Clementine picture was taken?

Yep, that is exactly what happened. The asteroid hit a rectangle of terrain from another spot in the old photograph and blasted it up in the air.... well of course the moon has no air but you know what I mean... and this rectangle of terrain landed intact at the new location. Quite simple and obvious really.

-

Re:Can the small crater be from a recent collision (1, Insightful)

andy314159pi (787550) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590665)

and this rectangle of terrain landed intact at the new location. Quite simple and obvious really.
Okay, okay you've proven that I'm a stupid dildo.

Re:Can the small crater be from a recent collision (1)

Kelson (129150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590555)

That was the initial explanation for the "new" feature, though as Bad Astronomy pointed out, since it's on the near side of the moon, the impact probably would have been observed. However, the actual article (unlike the misleading summary) states that it can be explained by a botched job stitching together the components of the mosaic.

Re:Can the small crater be from a recent collision (1)

andy314159pi (787550) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590611)

However, the actual article (unlike the misleading summary) states that it can be explained by a botched job stitching together the components of the mosaic.
You are right; I failed to read everything before posting. I was just looking at the pretty pictures.

Re:Can the small crater be from a recent collision (1)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591175)

You are right; I failed to read everything before posting. I was just looking at the pretty pictures.


How do you say "Relaxen und watchen das Blinkenkraters" in fake chinese?

Re:Can the small crater be from a recent collision (1)

andy314159pi (787550) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590569)

Couldn't the additional small crater seen in the Chinese photo be from an asteroid collision that occurred after the Clementine picture was taken?
If I had read all of the relevant links [badastronomy.com] then I would have read that the astronomer found no new or missing craters.

Shopped (1)

xyph0r (1153429) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590473)

But not in the convetional sense... China actually went up there AND MOVED THE MOON.
I for one welcome our new moon-altering overlords.

Actually... (2, Funny)

wolfman_jake (974273) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590497)

Chuck Norris round-house kicked someones ass into the moon after the previous pictures were taken and created a new crater.

ON the topic of it being a fake (0, Flamebait)

blhack (921171) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590513)

We have the ability to create beautiful 3D renditions of humain beings in real time (video games). Why are some of you utterly convinced that this is a legit photo because the lighting is a little bit different in this photo than the almost identical one released before it?

Pour some Chinese slave laborers on this problem and I'll bet that you would have finished product in about a week.

Re:ON the topic of it being a fake (5, Funny)

aicrules (819392) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590653)

Use of the chinese version of photoshop would be easy to test for, it has the lead-based paint bucket in place of the regular one...

Re:ON the topic of it being a fake (1)

Ironsides (739422) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590745)

Shall we start with the 3D renditions of Humans not looking realistic when you give it more than a glance? Followed by the picture looking like previous shots of the moon.

Misleading summary - it's not intentional (5, Informative)

iamacat (583406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590525)

As per the TFA, a mistake was made stitching together 19 separate photographs to produce image of a large area of the moon that the probe could not have captured in one shot. Since each picture is taken at slightly different angle and distance from the surface, some retouching is unavoidable. Otherwise some craters will look like a weird set of arcs with different radius rather than circles. Such stretching got to slightly move some depicted object from their exact position. In fact, it is not possible to produce a flat picture of a 3D object without distortions. Just compare the size and shape of Alaska on your globe as compared to your map.

I would assume that you can request the original mission data for serious research use instead of having to rely on newspaper clippings for science. If those images are also doctored, then we have a genuine controversy.

Re:Misleading summary - it's not intentional (1)

ultranova (717540) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591183)

In fact, it is not possible to produce a flat picture of a 3D object without distortions.

Of course it is. The surface of a cube, for example, can be projected to a plane without distortion.

Bootleg US Images (0)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590545)

I bet the Chinese program is just buying new pix made by NASA to present as their own, so NASA can ask for bigger budgets to compete. Someone at NASA is trying to keep China down by photoshopping the crater - in their Capricorn One Lunar Simulator.

But the question remains - who inserted the ' into the Chinese probe's English propaganda name? NASA doesn't have that tech in its budget - must be Russia or Japan.

This new space race is getting really interesting! For Korea's special effects houses, anyway.

Doctored my ass (5, Informative)

cats2ndlife (995125) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590553)

The original article says and suggests nothing about the photo being "doctored", it's simply a mistake that scientists make all the time. When can we expect a better moderated Slashdot or people who can read?

Re:Doctored my ass (4, Funny)

mihalis (28146) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590919)

When can we expect a better moderated Slashdot or people who can read?

That's going to be an in-game feature of Duke Nukem Forever.

For crying out loud, include the rationale! (4, Informative)

DRJlaw (946416) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590559)

The summary almost criminally neglects to include the reported reason for doing this, which is entirely legitimate:

Often, surface features that show up on two strips of data have to be manually corrected to produce the finished image, due to subtle changes in perspective.

"You know that there should have been seams in that image, and I just did not look for them carefully at the time," Lakdawalla told me today.


If you've ever viewed satellite imagery, you'll recognize that the source images are not nice, ultrahigh resolution wide arc views, but instead low resolution wide arc views or high resolution narrow arc views. The 'recognizable' product that is released to a nontechnical public, such as the images used in Google Earth, are the result of post-processing including image registration, tone correction, etc. See this article [incaindia.org] on mosaicing multi-sensor images, for example.

Surprise. Some technician made a mistake. No cookie.

People, RTFA, read the spoiler posts...PLEASE. (5, Informative)

Radon360 (951529) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590575)

I realize that it goes against the general Slashdot commenting procedure, but read just a little before commenting on this one, please.

1. Two photos were poorly stitched together, repeating an image of a crater on the combined photo (the crater was photographed twice).
2. Chinese scientists miss the poor stitch job and proclaim they found a new crater.
3. Someone else takes a close look at this "discovery" and points out the error in the stitch job.

The crater wasn't intentionally added, it's a result of trying to align two photos, each taken from a different perspective in which the edges won't completely line up exactly.

Re:People, RTFA, read the spoiler posts...PLEASE. (3, Insightful)

gnuman99 (746007) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591015)

They not only stitched it wrong, they also retouched the merge lines making the resulting image *useless* scientifically. It is just a nice picture now that one may as well have drawn. You can't do any measurements with it as all relative information is basically lost through their effort to make it prettier.

Re:People, RTFA, read the spoiler posts...PLEASE. (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591061)

Yes, this happens to international space photography every now and then too -- from the US, Europe, Russia... Often it's actually far more noticeable than in this case, and I seriously think that the controversy of this case actually comes from that the stitching is so *little* noticeable. That can make people come up with conspiracy theories. They probably wouldn't if the stitching was far more obvious, like from someone combining two images with even more differing perspectives [wikimedia.org] (see the northern parts of that photo). That, and of course being a Chinese experiment (damn Commies, etc, etc) plays against them per definition.

huh? (3, Insightful)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590587)

..and what happens if they actually do find anything new? hello! Boy who cried wolf syndrome....

pffffft. that was the sound of their credability dying a death.

its sad really, somewhere in China there are some *very* capable engineers holding their heads in their hands.

Chinese Fakes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590679)

In addition to the fake Diesel and Levi's Jeans, fake Ipods and numerous other fakes that come out of China, the Chinese gov't decided to get a piece of the action with Fake Moon Photos!
You gotta love China! They keep putting out cheap crap, and we keep buying it!

Rubber stamp tool in photoshop (1)

wigle (676212) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590751)

Open the image and Photoshop. Use the rubber stamp tool to remove some 'imaginary' seams. It is pretty easy to replicate the mistake and easy to understand how it could be made. The Chinese scientists should have verified their findings with the original un-stitched images before taking it to the press.

New Crater? (1)

Arkitus (1089627) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590773)

Could it be that the crater has been formed recently? Do things still hit the moon? Or has it been left untouched for a long time?

Re:New Crater? (1)

Deadstick (535032) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591117)

Could it be that the crater has been formed recently?

Yes -- if another explanation hadn't surfaced already, it could have been new, but with very low probability.

Do things still hit the moon?

Yes, but their mean size has been decreasing for eons as the Earth/Moon system sweeps out the rocks in its path. Little bitty ones still hit it all the time just as they hit Earth, but the bigger a crater is, the lower the probability that it's recent.

rj

I for one salute our Lunar Overlords (oblig) (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590851)

I for one salute our Lunar Overlords and their quick-thinking relocation of their Lunar Attack Base when they saw the Chinese coming!

hiding apollo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21590879)

could it be they saw the american lunar landers, and to be more patriotic, moved a crater a little to hide it?

did any of the apollo missions land near craters?

Its obvious... (1)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590991)

the Chinese photoshopped-out the secret alien moonbase where all the UFO's come from.
Everyone knows NASA have been sucessfully editing out alien content from all their space imagery since the 60's.
Th CIA were afriad that the Chinese would finally blow the game by releasing unedited images of aliens on the moon to the public.
It was only when Bush threatened trade sanctions on the import of fortune cookies that the Chinese agreed to also edit all imagery.

what i don't understand (1)

phishfood (562800) | more than 6 years ago | (#21590995)

with all the high powered telescopes, land and spaced based, why cant we point them at the moon and find the rover, flag, space boot prints, etc that was left over from the landing? its not like the moon has shifting sands or such (or does it? ;)

Re:what i don't understand (1)

nagora (177841) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591075)

with all the high powered telescopes, land and spaced based, why cant we point them at the moon and find the rover, flag, space boot prints, etc that was left over from the landing?

Well, they're not quite that clear but the photos have been taken of the sites complete with tracks of the buggies. Have you tried Google?

TWW

Well of COURSE there's a difference... (0, Troll)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | more than 6 years ago | (#21591065)

Anyone who's bought a "copywatch" or other knock-off product in China knows that sometimes the details are a bit different. What makes you think their version of the Moon would be identical, too?
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