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How They 3D Print Your WoW Character

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the avatar-to-action-figure dept.

Role Playing (Games) 54

WoW Insider had the chance to sit down with Ed Fries, the founder of the new and highly unique business FigurePrints. Fries is best known for his work at Microsoft on the original Xbox, but he hasn't been idle since he left the company in 2004. His newly launched service allows World of Warcraft players to 'print' their characters out as 3D sculptures. He and blogger Mike Schramm discuss the origins of the company, and the process used to make the figs: "At heart, it's basically an inkjet printer, which is pretty cool. It actually uses HP-11 inkjet printheads. But instead of printing on paper, it prints on a thin layer of plaster powder. So you have to imagine that there's a bay with a platform, and a spreader bar comes in and spreads a very thin layer of plaster powder, which has the consistency of flour. So it gets spread onto the platform, like a sheet of paper. And then the printheads come out, and they print right into that plaster. It sets the ink on top of it, and like paper it soaks into it-that plaster hardens."

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54 comments

A Physical Representation Of Your Pathetic Life (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21671861)

What better way to remember the complete waste your life is sitting in front of a computer for hours and hours each day...

"Oh I've wasted my life..."

That's actually the whole idea (5, Insightful)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 6 years ago | (#21673555)

What better way to remember the complete waste your life is sitting in front of a computer for hours and hours each day...

"Oh I've wasted my life..."


As opposed to someone whose life is so meaningfully spent trolling a message board? Oh yes, that's _got_ to be some achievement and valuable skills for life. How I envy you, sir ;)

Newsflash: yes, the _whole_ purpose of it is to waste some time in a fun way. We already know that. And I'm writing that as someone who doesn't even play WoW any more.

Thing is, humans weren't built to sit and stare at the walls. Even spreading some fresh paint on them and watching it dry, isn't actually all that exciting ;)

So we find things to fill our time with, that's more fun, and preferrably something different than what we do at work. You know, so those parts of the brain get some rest and some time to index and pre-process the information into permanent storage.

So some people sit at the couch and watch football. It's technically time wasted, but if they have fun there, that's what matters.

Some spend their life playing prom-queen, yakking the most recent gossip, and playing a complicated game of who's-popular-with-whom. It's rarely as useful as its proponents make it sound. Most of those people will give even less of a damn about you in a pinch, than your guildmates in WoW. Not saying that the latter is some gold standard of human empathy and helpfulness. More like that a clique of wannabe prom-queens is even more likely to just worry about their own "score" in that fucked-up game than about your problems.

In effect, that's mostly just another way to waste some time in a more entertaining way than watching paint dry.

Some people go sit on a lake's edge with a fishing rod, and pretend that it's some valuable survival skill (it isn't), or could feed a family (it doesn't), or that it builds character (it doesn't.) See, that thing doesn't really scale. We're too high a population, to feed ourselves with a fishing rod, and a too fucked up economy to buy anything with money earned selling that fish. The only way to make any money with fish is with either a fish farm, or a big fucking ship with nets and huge fridges. Unless you can afford either, you will _not_ keep your family fed with fishing, even in the most fantastic scenario imaginable.

Nope, that's just another way to waste some time in a way that the fisher finds more fun than watching paint dry.

Some people spend half of their free time fiddling with their car, and pretending that it makes them Real Men. Oh, and usually it comes with some pretense that it saves them such a huge heap of money. Newsflash: if it were about money, then get a second job in that time, and take your car to a mechanic when it breaks. Saving maybe 20 bucks on repairs even 1-2 times a year, at the expense of spending hundreds of hours in the garage per year, doesn't actually work out as great money/hour even in the poorest countries.

So, nope, that's another way to waste some time in a more entertaining way than watching paint dry.

Some go out in some god-forsaken woods or on some god-forsaken mountain and pretend that they're learning such great skills in the process. Well, yes, they do, except the catch is: the only times they'll ever use those skills is when they next do that highly unnatural exercise. There is _no_ time in a city when you'll have to find your way by seeing which side of the trees the moss grows on. And if you're into finding your way by the sun or stars, good luck with having line of sight or visibility for either. And here's another fun thought: you want _practical_ orientation skills? Get a GPS navigation sytem and learn to use it. _That_ is where orientation is at nowadays. So, anyway, it's skills that are in practice just as useful as my WoW skills: useful only when you go there again.

Yup, you've guessed my verdict: it's just another way people spend their time to have fun and relax.

Etc.

(And please don't consider any of the above said in a damning tone or anything. If you find it fun to mess with an engine, by all means, go ahead and do so. If you like to fish, by all means, get your butt to the nearest lake and fish. Etc.)

Are computer games any different? Nope. At the heart of it, that's the whole purpose: to spend your free time in some way you find fun.

As I was saying, I don't even play WoW any more. But when I look back at it, do I think, "oh, I've wasted my life"? Well, technically yes, but not in the regretful way you seem to imply. That was some of the damn best ways to waste my time so far. Which was the whole purpose of the exercise. Mission fucking accomplished. Do I regret any minute of it? Nope.

Re:That's actually the whole idea (3, Interesting)

edcheevy (1160545) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674067)

This is a nice thought, but you can eat fish and feed your family, if you so choose. It helps to be good at fishing, which I am not, but my skilled relatives give away extra fish whenever they have a chance because they have more than they need. As much as I enjoy video games, there are more useful ways to have fun, if that's what you're arguing against.

As for wandering around the woods, the mountains, the sea... at a basic level that too gets at the same "fun" that, as you say, can be found playing a game or watching TV. But I think I can safely say that nobody has ever had a peak experience of total peace, fulfillment, and understanding in front of either of those monitors. I'm not at all religious, but maybe that's the sort of feeling they have when they're tuned in to whatever they worship. Maybe someday, when we can jack into realistic VR, we'll be able to do it from home, but until then you will only experience the most base levels of "fun" if you never get out of your chair.

I don't mean to sound accusatory -- if anything, I hope to encourage somebody to go exploring. Under the day star. I know, I know, it burnss usss, but I promise you that the payoff can be greater than any game.

PS: Boy, we got just a titch OT, eh? ;)

Re:That's actually the whole idea (1)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674249)

Well, as I was saying, if for you that's fun, by all means, please do continue to do it. And taste being a subjective matter, well, yes, I do expect that a lot of people will find wandering around the woods in RL more satisfying than running around the virtual woods in WoW :)

Re:That's actually the whole idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21676151)

But I think I can safely say that nobody has ever had a peak experience of total peace, fulfillment, and understanding in front of either of those monitors.
Peace isn't really that entertaining to most people.

Re:That's actually the whole idea (1)

Haeleth (414428) | more than 6 years ago | (#21676543)

This is a nice thought, but you can eat fish and feed your family, if you so choose. It helps to be good at fishing, which I am not, but my skilled relatives give away extra fish whenever they have a chance because they have more than they need. As much as I enjoy video games, there are more useful ways to have fun, if that's what you're arguing against.
But feeding your family on fish alone wouldn't be a great idea - it's not a very balanced diet. You'd need an income of some sort to buy vegetables and so on, and I doubt you could sell the extra fish for that much money.

Likewise, is WoW really totally unproductive? I've never played it so can't really judge, but last I heard there were plenty of people making good money selling gold and loot -- so to me it seems quite plausible that playing WoW is potentially more profitable than fishing with a rod and line.

I don't mean to sound accusatory -- if anything, I hope to encourage somebody to go exploring. Under the day star. I know, I know, it burnss usss, but I promise you that the payoff can be greater than any game.
Personally I advocate a balanced lifestyle... getting out and doing stuff is great, and there's nothing quite like spending a night under sail in a yacht, or crossing a moor by torchlight in a snowstorm. But, equally, people who spend all their time in outdoor pursuits will never learn the joy of beating a really difficult boss or solving a really mind-bending puzzle.

I assure you, the elation I felt the first time I beat a Touhou game was every bit as great as the elation I feel when I reach the top of a mountain and drink in the glorious view. The experiences are equally intense, and I would be sorry to have gone without either.

Re:That's actually the whole idea (1)

HouseArrest420 (1105077) | more than 6 years ago | (#21702650)

But I think I can safely say that nobody has ever had a peak experience of total peace, fulfillment, and understanding in front of either of those monitors. I'm not at all religious, but maybe that's the sort of feeling they have when they're tuned in to whatever they worship. Maybe someday, when we can jack into realistic VR, we'll be able to do it from home, but until then you will only experience the most base levels of "fun" if you never get out of your chair.
Not entirely sure what you were getting at with this remark, or into what gaming bracket you include yourself (hardcore/casual). But I'm both a hardcore gamer and an amature rock climber. Ppl, most anyway, do the whole nature thing for the rush they get. They don't climb MT Everest because it looks nice from the bottom. They do it for the rush. Wierd because I get the same adrenaline rush I get from climbing up a black trail that I do from raping the hell outta a clan during a scrim in CS. Matter of fact, my CS experience is more akin to snorting cocaine because not only do I get the rush but after extended play I've always found that I've been grinding my teeth and the insides of my cheeks are all chewed up. Now I'm not a coke head or a religous buff, but I know plenty of coke heads, and they have all said a coke high is as close as your going to get to god unless you go back in time to play football with Jesus.

Point is there are ALWAYS more useful ways to have fun. But trying to compare two completely different ways of having fun like you did, when they actually illicit the same physiological (sp?) feelings in the person who's actually DOING it, is like comparing apples to bananas....when they taste the same.....if that makes sense lol.

Re:That's actually the whole idea (1)

illumin8 (148082) | more than 6 years ago | (#21675207)

Good comment, I agree with most of what you say, but I have to point out one area where you're dead wrong:

Most of those people will give even less of a damn about you in a pinch, than your guildmates in WoW.
In my experience, and yes, I'm in a raiding guild that is currently raiding Black Temple and Hyjal, so I know a little bit about WoW, your guildmates in WoW don't give a flying fuck about you besides what you can do to help them get loot. Loot is pretty much all that matters in WoW, and this can be observed because as soon as one person fucks up and wipes the raid, everybody makes them feel like shit on vent and bitches at them until their self esteem has been taken down about 10 pegs and they feel like /wrists. Also, the guild drama I've seen has led me to believe that the only reason any of these people even spend as much time together as they do is that they want loot. If our guild ever met in real life, we'd discover that there are so many social differences that we don't even get along.

I'm just stating what I found out to be the truth. Guilds stick together, even highly successful guilds like mine, because of a common goal and interest (raiding and getting loot). Take away that common interest, and we're just 25 strangers on vent talking about shit that doesn't interest the other 24.

Depends on the guild, I guess (4, Insightful)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 6 years ago | (#21675475)

It depends on the guild, I guess.

On one hand, yes, the average WoW player seems to not care about anything except epic loot. I won't argue with you about that. It _is_ the truth.

On the other hand, I've ended up in a guild where "epic" was a forbidden word on the guild channel. Mostly formed out of people who had enough of the raiding guilds drama and obsessions. Some had founded a guild, and ended up kicked out of it, because they couldn't take part in _every_ _single_ MC raid. (Yeah, it was before BC.) Which I guess just confirms your point about most guilds.

But the fact remains, you do have a choice of people you associate with. If hanging around with a bunch of virtual sociopaths, who care only about their precious loot and who see your only value as helping them get it, starts to get on your tits, you can always find yourself a different group.

Of course that might mean kissing goodbye the chances of getting the missing pieces of your top tier gear. So I guess it's time to ask yourself what your priorities are.

Me, I actually found it a lot more fun to hang around people who actually act like a bunch of friends. I was actually glad to be rid of "contribution points", planned raid nights, peer pressure, and all that stress. It's actually more fun (for me) to know that if, say, my engineer made a rifle and scope for some newbie hunter, it's just, you know, because I like helping newbies. Not for 2 contribution points, not because they might have a high level alt to help me in return, just because I was bored enough to make a rifle for a newbie. Or maybe I'll go run a perfect stranger warrior through RFK for their armour quest instead of doing the raid of the day. Just because they asked politely and said "please." Pick their hunter friend too, because he wanted to tame one of those boars. Or whatever.

But I guess everyone's mileage varies, so I'm not saying that everyone should swear off their epic gear. Just saying that such guilds do exist. Whether you're crazy enough to actually want to be in one, that's not for me to decide.

Re:Depends on the guild, I guess (1)

WreathOfBarbs (804654) | more than 6 years ago | (#21675815)

I agree. I tried the Raiding Guild business and ended up feeling like a slave to the DKP grind, always having to stay on top of the DKP pile just in case that special epic dropped. I finally just walked away from the loot drama and my DKP and went back to my old guild of friends. We don't raid 25 mans, but I can grind like nobody's business so I have my epics, but they are all crafted, world drops or Arena pieces. I feel good about the fact that my characters still kick ass even without being in a 'leet raiding guild. And yeah, for the most part, my guildies are my friends since the ones that are only concerned about loot left a long time ago for more progressed guilds.

Re:That's actually the whole idea (1)

PastaLover (704500) | more than 6 years ago | (#21737812)

Apparently you have not been playing WoW long enough to get there is a world of difference between the 25 man raiders and the casual guilds. The large, "we have two groups raiding black temple" type guilds are definitely the way you describe them. I've met quite a few people like that in WoW who would fuck anyone over for a piece of purple, that doesn't mean it's the norm. I'm in a casual guild (biggest thing we do is raid karazhan, very infrequently) and it's completely reversed. I actually like these people, we have met in real life and we do get along well.

I guess in the end, it's just like in real life, shit always floats to the top. :P

Re:That's actually the whole idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21675589)

Methinks thou doth protest too much...

Re:That's actually the whole idea (1)

BrowncoatJedi (1006665) | more than 6 years ago | (#21677185)

Our economy is too "fucked up" to earn real money from fishing? Did you somehow miss out on the whole Industrial Revolution and Information Age thing? No, we'd be fucked back into the stone age if fishing made real money.

Re:A Physical Representation Of Your Pathetic Life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21680937)

What better way to remember the complete waste your life is sitting in front of a computer for hours and hours each day...
You could print out your slashdot trolls.

Price subjective? (2, Insightful)

Tink2000 (524407) | more than 6 years ago | (#21671921)

Not in my mind: $115 could get me more than 10 months worth of game time.

$115 not cheap enough for you? (2, Insightful)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672289)

Not in my mind: $115 could get me more than 10 months worth of game time.
Well, the alternatives, if you want something like this, are either learn to sculpt and paint a figure yourself, or pay someone else to do it.

If you were to hire a modeler to do it, most likely they'd be able to take some shortcuts to reduce their workload (for instance, using recast parts from existing figure kits to make the basic body form) but it'd still represent a whole lot of work. $100 would probably be a bargain if you went this route... The results you get would depend on how much you're willing to pay, and how committed the modeler is to getting it right.

If you were to learn to do it yourself - obviously this is a significant investment of time and effort for most people. You could very likely wind up with a lesser monetary cost, but a much higher cost in terms of effort and time spent on the project.

As someone who's accustomed to $30-$40 mass-produced model kits (and first-run resin kits priced over $100) I'd say a custom-manufactured figure for about $100 ain't too shabby, if you want one.

Re:$115 not cheap enough for you? (2, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672845)

Must agree. I'm also a modeler (mostly figure and sci-fi subjects. I do a little WW2 and modern general aviation too), and being used to the cost of resin garage kits, this doesn't seem all that bad. To put into perspective: I paid $80 for a 1/72nd scale BSG (New Series) Viper Mk II kit that is about 5 inches long. I've seen PLENTY of figure kits go for at or above $200. Dropping $100 on a nice little figure like this is not bad at all.

I guess it boils down to whether you need it (2, Insightful)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674513)

Well, I guess it boils down to whether you need it or not. Bang/buck is a very variable thing, especially in a matter of personal tastes where everyone has another idea of what the "bang" is.

If you're into such figurines, yeah, it's not a bad price at all. If you don't, then it is.

If you always wanted such a figurine, yeah, it beats sculpting one yourself. But even there it forks. For some people it's doing it that's the fun, not the owning the figurine.

E.g., a lot of tabletop wargame players actually are more into modding and painting the figurines than in actually playing with them. Actually playing a, say, 2000 point battle, is half way an occasion to show those figurines off, and half way an excuse as to why they're doing it. But some have painted 10 times the figurines they'll ever need, and have plenty they've never used.

So I guess everyone's mileage varies.

Re:I guess it boils down to whether you need it (1)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674803)

If you're into such figurines, yeah, it's not a bad price at all. If you don't, then it is.
If you're not into such figurines then the price doesn't matter. :)

If you always wanted such a figurine, yeah, it beats sculpting one yourself. But even there it forks. For some people it's doing it that's the fun, not the owning the figurine.
Well, certainly that's something I can relate to. Generally I'd rather build than buy. But even among people who spend a lot of time building, painting, even modifying models, the idea of actually building one from scratch remains a significant hurdle - whether because they lack the skills to do it right or because the idea of trying simply intimidates them...

Basically anybody, whether they're a builder or not, has to deal with their own limitations in something like this. Like, yeah, I could build a model of just about anything I like - but how much time does that take? How many other projects have to be put on hold for that? So I can't actually build everything I might want...

I think both modelers and free software programmers have this problem: occasional excess of "do-it-yourself" approach... We write off the value of paying to have work done for us, figure it's something we could do ourselves - but then when the time comes to actually get it done, it's not such a simple task...

Re:Price subjective? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21673273)

I don't think you really grasp it.

There's quite a significant difference between play time on a mass production game and a custom figure. The game can be made affordable through economies of scale, custom figures really can't, even with this technology. For what it is, it's incredibly inexpensive.

That doesn't mean you have to buy it, or like the price, but please understand that there are limitations on what's a realistic expectation for custom products.

Re:Price subjective? (1)

Tink2000 (524407) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674625)

Oh no, I grasp it. I was trying to be pithy and judging by the comments, either everyone missed it or no-one but me so far in this thread plays WoW and has to budget that $15 a month. Paying on a month-to-month or using gamecards for bimonthly payments, $110 is about 10 months of playtime. Ask a heroin junkie if he would rather buy $110 worth of junk or if he'd rather buy $110 of something concrete that deals directly with his habit (say, a golden syringe) and he's gonna go for the junk (or steal something and get both).

Re:Price subjective? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21677375)

OK, I get that. I don't think this guy has anything to be worried about. He's got more orders than he can deal with even if his products are priced out of the range of a lot of players. But if you've got years invested into your character, then compared to the cost and effort, the statue is pretty inexpensive.

Re:Price subjective? (1)

Tink2000 (524407) | more than 6 years ago | (#21678209)

Yeah, I could even actually see me getting one ... except by the time it got in my hands (6-8 weeks after winning the monthly lottery) I'd almost expect my toon to look signifigantly different.

Not arguing at all about the supposed coolness factor, just sayin ... man, that's a lot of gametime dollars for something that's just a reminder and an approximation of what you have going on.

They're not charging enough. (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21675789)

A big part of the article deals with the complicated lottery system they've got because they don't expect to be able to meet demand. To me, that says, "Price too low."

Re:Price subjective? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21686363)

You comment is like saying "150,000$ for a Ferrari? That's enough gas to go around the world in my minivan". Good for you, go on your world trip!

From the site's FAQ:

Because of the overwhelming demand and because each of our prints is hand crafted, we are forced to limit availability. The order process begins with creating an account on the FigurePrints.com website. This will enter you into the drawing for FigurePrints creation during that time frame. Once that account sign up period ends, we will randomly select customers based on capacity for creation.

In other words they could charge 300 to 600$ and still be full. Not that players are that crazy, just that enough consider this like I do a chocolate bar! Pocket change.

I predict... (1)

Alexpkeaton1010 (1101915) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672005)

This company is going to make millions.

Re:I predict... (1)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672047)

Maybe not, the article links mention they're limiting to a 100 per month production run. Subtracting out the materials, and they're probably making a few grand a month. Not bad for a single person but it probably wouldn't pay for the 3d printer lease.

Re:I predict... (1)

Funkcikle (630170) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672175)

I doubt it - the HP inkjet parts they are using will probably only be good for about three or four uses before they need to be replaced at some ridiculous price.

Re:I predict... (0)

dtml-try MyNick (453562) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672301)

I predict that as soon as Blizzard's legal department is done with them they will need millions....

Re:I predict... (1)

j.sanchez1 (1030764) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672419)

I predict that as soon as Blizzard's legal department is done with them they will need millions....

The articel says that Blizzard has helped them by giving them special access to extra information in The Armory to help them with the modeling.

Re:I predict... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21672673)

I predict we need a "-1 RTFA" modifier on comments.

How do they print them? (2, Informative)

night_flyer (453866) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672213)

Probably like this... [slashdot.org]

Re:How do they print them? (1)

dmatos (232892) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672365)

RTFSummary.

It's inkjet printer heads and inkjet printer ink. They've got a platform that they spread plaster powder on. When each layer is printed with the ink, it soaks into the plaster powder, which then hardens.

Re:How do they print them? (2, Informative)

howlatthemoon (718490) | more than 6 years ago | (#21673913)

They are certainly using a ZCorp [zcorp.com] printer. To the best of my knowledge, ZCorp still is the only manufacturer to make a multi-color 3D printer. These would be easy to print ( I run a zcorp machine). It is hard to judge the print volume from the photos, but it appears to be a pretty fair price considering the cost of the machine, materials and post processing time.

Pillow pals (4, Funny)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672853)

Pretty awesome, can they make a life sized pillow of my blood elf?

Re:Pillow pals (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 6 years ago | (#21672979)

Don't know about life-sized, but I do wish they had some choices as to scale. I know that they are done to scale with each other, but they look like they're 1:8 or maybe 1:10 scale. I build and collect figure models and prefer to keep all my stuff in 1:6 scale :(. I'd certainly pay extra for the larger figure.

Re:Pillow pals (1)

gknoy (899301) | more than 6 years ago | (#21673833)

I'd certainly pay extra for the larger figure.
I bet... ;) (sorry, couldn't resist.)

Re:Pillow pals (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21680099)

The guys that make Real Dolls might be able to help you with that one.

Cool technology (2, Interesting)

dr00g911 (531736) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674271)

I grew up dreaming of being able to make my own action figures.

Over the last few years, a new category of 3D service bureaus has begun to pop up where you can place an order for model prints fairly quickly [3darttopart.com] .

I've actually used this process on a couple of projects that I've worked on, and every time I walk through the exhibit hall at Siggraph I find myself hoping that a desktop model will reach somewhere around $1k soon.

Currently, it's an imprecise science -- you have to make certain that your model is "watertight" -- meaning that it registers as a solid object when passed to the fab software. You also have to thicken things like teeth, swords etc because the glue process makes thin items rather brittle.

Depending on the fabricator, you might have to paint the model after the fact, and on a whole lot of these you actually need to sand and prime the finished figure as many of the fabricators leave a sort of "fuzzy" surface that needs to be smoothed to look good.

Anyhow, it's a really cool tech for concept art and rapid prototyping, and if you've got the skillset to watertight models you create, you can have your 3DS/Maya etc models printed pretty reasonably ($45-150ish depending on bounding box volume).

Print Resolution's Effect on Faces (2, Interesting)

Pearson (953531) | more than 6 years ago | (#21674601)

I've seen some models from the Zcorp machines and while impressive, they have a definite layering to them. On an 8" tall figure, it's not any more distracting than the naturally rough texture of the rest of the model, but at these tiny scales the character's face will probably be distorted.

I've seen their promotional images (which aren't very large) and the models look pretty good (color bleed is a bit much in places), but I can't tell if they are doing something (like sanding) to get rid of that stratification effect. $115 is pretty cheap, though.

Unique, I nique, we all nique (1)

jmoriarty (179788) | more than 6 years ago | (#21675231)

I've been using the intertubes long enough that I rarely feel the need to go all Grammarian on anyone, but this one is a peeve for some reason. So I'm going to throw a few karma points under the bus and get it out of my system.

WoW Insider had the chance to sit down with Ed Fries, the founder of the new and highly unique business
"unique" means one of a kind, alone, as in singular. You really cannot modify that aspect of it. "Very unique" means "very one of a kind" and makes no sense. It's one of a kind, or it isn't. If it isn't singular, then it may be "very unusual", but it isn't unique, let alone "very unique". Same with "highly unique", "incredibly unique", "commonly unique", "doubly unique", or even "gobsmackingly unique".

Oh, yeah, I feel a LOT better. Like I just doubled the fiber in my diet or something. I think I'm good for the next few years.

Thanks for listening!

Re:Unique, I nique, we all nique (1)

Drawkcab (550036) | more than 6 years ago | (#21730234)

People pointing that out is a pet peeve of mine. Under the strict definition, anything and everything is unique. Even if it isn't immediately apparent, each object has a unique history, a unique position, a unique trajectory. Any sufficiently complex object has a unique structure, even if the differences are subtle. Everything as complex as a human being is unique in a billion small ways.

Thus, a word like unique becomes meaningless when applied rigidly. We acknowledge that everything is unique in some way. What we mean when we say something is highly unique is that it is unique in more ways than some other thing or that it is unique in some major way that is easily recognized.

No restrictions on armor or lack thereof? (0)

coug_ (63333) | more than 6 years ago | (#21678951)

So... I can make a naked female Night Elf figurine?

Tactile game life (1)

Avatar8 (748465) | more than 6 years ago | (#21683987)

Of the numerous players I've met in virtual and real life since starting MMOs in 1997, I think every single one of them would jump at the chance to have something like this: a little piece of the virtual world you can touch. This will attract the same people who played and collected games with "feelies"(tokens included in RPGs to enhance your connection to the game) like the Infocom Wishbringer and Origin's Ultima series.


I'm quite certain this company will be overwhelmed with people waiting at the door for the opportunity to buy one, two or several characters from WoW or other games in the future. Those first few hundred people will hopefully provide sufficient funds for more equipment and more artists to meet the demand. You could see this product/service's end of life if they could possibly fulfill all orders, but just when everyone from the game-du-jour are satisfied, a new game comes out with new characters and people will want another one.

Any smart investors out there will jump on this opportunity and help the company get to mass production ASAP. I wish I had a lump of cash to invest because this is the first sure thing I've caught at its debut. Guess I'll have to watch for when they go public and grab some stock.

Not really new (1)

bukowski01 (901465) | more than 6 years ago | (#21689666)

I'm not trying to be annoying but this tech is not that cutting edge. Companys that make miniatures for games use just about this same thing all the time and have been for a while. All that being said - it still is pretty cool to seeit being used in the fashion.

Figrue Prints, they're amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21694294)

I'm part of the guild that he made the figure prints for, i would just like to say that they are of amazing quality. I know some peopel who got them and saw them in articles and such and it looked exactly like them.
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