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Computer History Museum's YouTube Channel

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the way-it-was dept.

Television 39

Doctor-R writes "The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA has created a new YouTube channel for videos of their lecture series. Newest is the Dec 10 panel on the 25th Anniversary of the Commodore 64. Currently there are 23 lectures available and the 7-minute Museum overview."

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DECSystem 10 (1)

callmetheraven (711291) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714028)

Newest is the Dec 10 panel
I read that as "DEC-10 panel." Was thinking someone used a panel from a DEC-10 to show youtube videos?

Re:DECSystem 10 (1)

callmetheraven (711291) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714112)

Dang this video is long.

Re:DECSystem 10 (4, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714130)

Dang this video is long.

There is something to be said for plain old text and a few pictures.

Re:DECSystem 10 (1)

JackMeyhoff (1070484) | more than 6 years ago | (#21715018)

Yeah, nothing like a LONG article to read when somebody can narrate it to you.

I don't agree, (1)

thrill12 (711899) | more than 6 years ago | (#21716022)

... when you watch it you see the expressions on their faces, the intonations in the sentences they speak and the things they leave out. It gives you much more info than text and pictures, and makes you pick up the things in the speeches that matter...

But this is probably the wrong place to say that ;=)

Next step (3, Informative)

Z80xxc! (1111479) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714100)

The next thing they need to do is take pictures inside the museum itself and make some of those quicktime 3D/360 degrees view things. I don't particularly like quicktime, but that is one cool thing about it.

Or, they could make an actual 3D museum, sort of like google earth, only inside. Now THAT would be awesome.

Re:Next step (2, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714172)

Or, they could make an actual 3D museum, sort of like google earth, only inside.

They could do it inside second life! On second thoughts, maybe not so awesome.

Re:Next step (1)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714198)

Yeah, or make a level for a FPS, and distribute that. "Download our Quake level here", for example.

Oh, I forgot, games are evil, and corrupt kids...

Make it an MMORPG in a friendly zone (2, Funny)

SL Baur (19540) | more than 6 years ago | (#21715618)

Yeah, or make a level for a FPS, and distribute that. "Download our Quake level here", for example.
What are you going to do in an FPS besides kill things? So what would be the theme of such a game?

What genre is Hello Kitty's Island Adventure?

Re:Next step (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714456)

Or, the CHM could put these videos in a medium that works in Opera-Ubuntu.

Three days ago YouTube/Google tweaked their code, and movies have not worked since. A bug report has been filed as well as can be done through YouTube's alleged Contact link-trail, but appending a comment to a feedback-form about the quality of the Help section's advice hardly inspires confidence that a code bug will be forwarded to devs.

Re:Next step (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714616)

Why don't you like quicktime? Is there a technical reason for it, or is it because of licensing issues (ie non FOSS)? If the latter, then you should write to Apple: it's better than complaining on Slashdot!

With (4, Interesting)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714768)

Or, they could make an actual 3D museum, sort of like google earth, only inside. Now THAT would be awesome.

With emulations of the machines at each display point. Not too difficult to do these days. Use this [mess.org] , or maybe something like this. [dreamfabric.com]

Re:With (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21716728)

Emulations are for wimps.

Seriously tho, you lose a lot of the 'effect' with an emulator. Its not the same as the real stuff siting there at your fingertips.

Re:With (1)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 6 years ago | (#21718188)

I own a C64 with 1541 drive, and Apple IIe, a Mac Classic, two Mac SE 030s, Amiga 500, Amiga 2000 w 1.3 roms and GVP 8 meg expansion and scsi 120 meg drive.

I agree with you - there's nothing like real hardware. It's just a little difficult to download is all. =)

PS: My wife and I are new parents. I told her that I'd like to set up all my old gear around the house for when the kid grows up. Tell him that's what computers are. Then on his 12th birthday say "just kidding!" and get him a top of the line PC and a Playstation 6 or whatever's hot at the time and blow his mind.

Re:With (1)

Windom Earle (1200137) | more than 6 years ago | (#21725840)

As long as you max out the RAM and install NetBSD on the SE/30's, he wouldn't miss out on *that* much...

Probably the same for the Amiga 2000.

Damn... (1)

Palpitations (1092597) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714210)

I'm still kicking myself for not visiting this place the last time I was in CA. I was there to visit with my girlfriend at the time and meet her family - it turns out her dad made a pretty substantial donation to the museum. I believe it may have been a T/16, but that's just a guess - my memories of talking to him about it are pretty hazy. I tried to find out more on their website, but unfortunately they don't have anything mentioning donations on there (though his name is on a plaque at the museum from what I hear).

Hmmm... I'll have to look into this some more.

Not alone... (1)

maaskaas (1103983) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714232)

The University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia also have their own channel. They use it for similiar purposes as the museum but also to give overviews of each faculty and the research they are doing.

I think this is an excellent way for these institutions to present themselves. It's much more convenient just watching a movie on Youtube than reading the "About Us" section on their websites.

Furthermore, it's much easier formming opinions and attitudes when you see something visual than when you a webpage or two.

too lazy to rtfa, but... (0, Redundant)

Anne Honime (828246) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714336)

... I thought the DEC-10 panel was a plain pdp/11 ? Where's the point ?

Re:too lazy to rtfa, but... (1)

Tore S B (711705) | more than 6 years ago | (#21716252)

That was only the case on a few machines, like, I believe, the KS-10, and the KL-10. The KA-10 and KI-10, for example, did not have such a console, and had a proper 36 bit wide blinkenconsole, wired straight into the CPU.

http://simh.trailing-edge.com/photos/pdp10.jpg [trailing-edge.com] has a picture of the KA-10.

Wow (1)

ziggit (811520) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714400)

Now those are some long videos

no obligitory commodore 64 webserver link? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714404)

is no-one going to post a c64 running as a webserver?

Commodore book On the Edge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714410)

Read the book that tells the Commodore story: www.commodorebook.com

Re:Commodore book On the Edge (2, Informative)

scottgfx (68236) | more than 6 years ago | (#21720676)

It is a fascinating book. It's more than just about Commodore. It's about the entire personal computer revolution. Even though I'm a Apple user now, It is good to read some history that isn't Apple and Microsoft centric.

FUCK KDAWSON IN THE ASS! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714414)

kdawson would rather see some fucking blog make the front page of slashdot instead of real hardcore technology articles. slashdot is turning into a den of fanbois and malcontents who have never coded anything and probably don't even hold a help desk position. these know nothings make themselves apparent but never get modded down because other fanbois are the ones with the mod points and they're too busy tossing off to anyone who bashes miscrosoft even if their reason for bashing them is proven to be untrue. truth be damned, kdawson, just keep the fires burning. cmdrdildo is profiting off of kdawsons obnoxious fanboi content and is laughing the whole way to the bank while fucktards are subscribing to read more preaching to a badly educated choir.

Early computing (5, Interesting)

Sanat (702) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714706)

I started my computer career in 1962 working as a systems analyst. Later in 1970 worked with the CDC 3200 mainframe. The basic timing mechanism was a delay line that sent a "0" down it with various taps for read, write, gating, etc that the magnetic core memory and associated electronics required.

We would run margins on the computer by setting the voltage low and test it then setting the voltage high and retest to verify that it would pass diagnostics under both conditions.

The toughest thing i ever did was rewire a memory board by hand to replace a broken ferrite core. It required unlacing the diagonal "Z" sense wire and then removing the x and y wires plus the inhibit x wire and then reinstalling the wiring. Fortunately I was nearsighted and could see the fine wires but today I would have problems even seeing a core since I am now very far sighted.

Every job that I have ever had was like a game for me. I would have paid someone to allow me to do what i got paid to do. that sure makes time fly though.

I worked with Dr. Wang at Wang Laboratories and traveled to China with him to meet his siblings. While there I installed some of the very first mini-computers/mainframe for China. We slowed the rpm of the disk drives down from 3600 to 2400 and then installed high altitude heads to keep the disk's heads from crashing. Also the seek flip-flop in the logic had a bigger capacitor on it so that after the heads settled from moving then the read/write cycle could occur. By adding the extra capacitance slowed the access time down greatly so that China would not be on parity with us,

That has been a career of 45 years which is far older than most individual who read Slashdot. My 4H project when I was 13 or 14 was building a ham transmitter and modulator. That was back in the 50's.

I was one of the original geeks and today could not stay up with what the average individual on slashdot needs to know... it is just too much information now, but I do enjoy those that post here and those that actually enjoy the coding and the fixing of equipment for it shows in your posts.

Re:Early computing (1)

MikeSty (890569) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714992)

What an awesome life story. As a youngin' who's a freshman engineering student, I tip my cap to you good sir.

Re:Early computing (1)

SL Baur (19540) | more than 6 years ago | (#21715656)

I started my computer career in 1962
Hmm, a 3 digit id and I was only born in 1962. I guess I'm new here.

I wish you would post more ... you're a goldmine of knowledge.

Re:Early computing (1)

Brandybuck (704397) | more than 6 years ago | (#21718730)

I was one of the original geeks and today could not stay up with what the average individual on slashdot needs to know... it is just too much information now

The trick is specialization. In the past it was possible to have in-depth knowledge in all areas of computing. Today that is impossible. You have to narrow down your expertise to fewer areas. A lot of geek younglings think they know everything, but it's just opinionated arrogance and not true knowledge.

Re:Early computing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21719676)

Now I'm not saying you're the guy who bought the low id on the slashdot auction....

oh wait

Re:Early computing (1)

Cal Paterson (881180) | more than 6 years ago | (#21720714)

That has been a career of 45 years which is far older than most individual who read Slashdot. My 4H project when I was 13 or 14 was building a ham transmitter and modulator. That was back in the 50's.
I'm just hoping I will enjoy my career as much as you have obviously enjoyed yours.

Thank god for ripzor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714776)

I can rip that flv and convert it to watch it later.

Re:Thank god for ripzor (1)

Jerry Rivers (881171) | more than 6 years ago | (#21714840)

Not sure about on Windows, but in OS X you can simply download the free RealPlayer. It comes with RealPlayer Downloader, which will automatically download flv files from websites, including YouTube.

You can then use VLC or QuickTime (if you have Perian installed) to watch them.

Re:Thank god for ripzor (2, Funny)

British (51765) | more than 6 years ago | (#21715110)

You're recommending* the downloading of RealPlayer on Slashdot? Turn in your keys, sir.

Re:Thank god for ripzor (1)

coastwalker (307620) | more than 6 years ago | (#21718996)

I just downloaded the Mars rover vid to show my brothers kids when we meet up in an offline environment over Christmas. Used a windows program Orbit downloader. Its closed source and runs some P2p stuff that I blocked off until I find out what their credentials are.

The videos are terrific, JPL also have some interesting stuff they share through podcasting that are well worth seeking out.
 

Most technologically advanced city? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21714950)

Voted most advanced, this city has a lot to offer:

technocity [myminicity.com]

Started as an AA meeting... (1)

thrill12 (711899) | more than 6 years ago | (#21715660)

...when Tool said "Who of you is here for the first time ?.... Wow... Thank you to you all... (Applause)" ;=)
 
What's next, dude standing up saying: "I am Vic, and I am a Commodore-addict for 20 years, I haven't poked 32768 for 2 weeks" (Loud Applause)

Re:Started as an AA meeting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21718118)

"I am Vic, and I am a Commodore-addict for 20 years, I haven't poked 32768 for 2 weeks"


Whereupon Slashdot user id #32768 stood up, cried, and ran out.

They're available in high resolution, too (4, Informative)

Tore S B (711705) | more than 6 years ago | (#21716298)

If you view the Past Events on the Computer History Museum, you will see all of the talks, in quite high-quality WMV files.

http://www.computerhistory.org/events/index.php?view=previous&section=calendar [computerhistory.org]

In addition, there is a website called http://archive.computerhistory.org/ [computerhistory.org] which apparently functions as somewhere they stash files that they don't mind being public, but don't care enough to yell loudly about. There are a lot of cool videos there! Highly recommended.

Also highly recommended is the Computer History Museum itself. It is an incredibly exciting place to go. It's about two or three stone's throws from the Googleplex, in Mountain View, in an old SGI building. Go there. Donations also recommended, because in short: They do extremely important work, they're the only ones who do it well enough, and they've got extremely skilled people there.

I am not affiliated with the museum, but I do wear the "Volunteer" shirt with some amount of pride. :)

Re:They're available in high resolution, too (1)

ShakaUVM (157947) | more than 6 years ago | (#21723474)

Ditto, I've been to some talks there, and it's an awesome place.
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