Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Black Hole Blasts Neighbor Galaxy with Deadly Jet

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the no-star-system-will-dare-oppose-the-emperor-now dept.

Space 222

butterwise writes to mention that astronomers have, for the first time, witnessed a super-massive black hole hitting a nearby galaxy with a "death-star-like" beam of energy. The story also has a video with simulations, pictures, and explanations. "The 'death star galaxy,' as NASA astronomers called it, could obliterate the atmospheres of planets but also trigger the birth of stars in the wake of its destructive beam. Fortunately, the cosmic violence is a safe distance from our own neck of the cosmos."

cancel ×

222 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

You don't say (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732646)

Last weekend, I blasted my balck neighbor's hole with a massive jet of my man juice

- With regards,

Zonk

Re:You don't say (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733182)


Last weekend, I blasted my balck neighbor's hole with a massive jet of my man juice

- With regards,

Zonk


I'm not black, I was just covered in feces at the time.

-Pudge

Phew, good job it's far away (2, Funny)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732650)

Imagine that on a Boeing, you wouldn't have to worry about collateral damage, there'd be nothing remotely collateral left :-)

He Who Smelt It Dealt It (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732656)

Black hole denies farting; blames it on nearby neutron star.

Re:He Who Smelt It Dealt It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732840)

I wish I had mod points 'cause that's funny :D

Re:He Who Smelt It Dealt It (3, Funny)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733088)

I'd have blamed it on Sirius.

Re:He Who Smelt It Dealt It (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733366)

I'd have blamed it on Uranus

Re:He Who Smelt It Dealt It (5, Funny)

nofx_3 (40519) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733408)

Me: "I'm sorry, Anonymous Coward, but astronomers renamed Uranus in 2620 to end that stupid joke once and for all."
AC: "Oh. What's it called now?"
Me: "Urectum. Here, let me locate it for you."

-kap

Re:He Who Smelt It Dealt It (1)

nofx_3 (40519) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733436)

er, I meant to give credit there to Futurama in my P.S.

Re:He Who Smelt It Dealt It (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733566)

I'd blame it on a big fiery, black-ass hole in space. (Any uranus-sized Pepto-Abyssmal or Tums for that?)

Possible names for the galaxies? (2, Insightful)

bark76 (410275) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733192)

Terrence and Phillip?

Way to be taken seriously.. (1)

stormguard2099 (1177733) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732664)

If you want to be taken seriously as an astronomer then might I suggest not comparing your research to fictional works

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (0, Troll)

TheLazySci-FiAuthor (1089561) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732692)

Well, they do call them the "heavens" and we all know the fictional works that term comes from.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (5, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732734)

Besides, the ability to blast an entire neighboring galaxy with a gamma ray beam is insignificant compared to the power of the Force.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (5, Funny)

Radres (776901) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733430)

Don't try to frighten us with your sorcerer's ways, Dachannien. Your sad devotion to that ancient religion has not helped you complete your Q2 deliverables on time, or given you clairvoyance to know when your boss won't notice that you're reading Slashdot...

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (5, Funny)

Surlyboi (96917) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733622)

I find your lack of karma disturbing...

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (5, Interesting)

Veinor (871770) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732784)

Yeah, we all know that scientific [wikipedia.org] nomenclature [wikipedia.org] is [wikipedia.org] serious [wikipedia.org] business [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732852)

the physics term is pronounced "kwork"
Well, I have a degree in physics and I've never heard it pronounced "kwork", everyone pronounced it as it's spelt, as "kwark". Maybe it's a UK/US thing?

Speaking of quarks though, I like the names - charm, strange, up, down, top and bottom (which were called truth and beauty at first; I still think they should have stuck).

Anyway, scientific nomenclature is a serious business - but scientists are people too...

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732928)

Well, I have a degree in physics and I've never heard it pronounced "kwork", everyone pronounced it as it's spelt, as "kwark". Maybe it's a UK/US thing?
Yes, indeed it is. Most Americans I have come in contact with pronounce it "kwork", whereas the Brits (including my lecturer in experimental particle physics) pronounce it "kwark". And btw, I have a PhD in physics too.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (1)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733052)

Chalk one up for "kwark" from an Australian with a Physics Degree.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (1)

cHiphead (17854) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733554)

Chalk one up for "kwark" for an American that took a physics class back in high school.

Cheers.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (1)

scheme (19778) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733610)

Yes, indeed it is. Most Americans I have come in contact with pronounce it "kwork", whereas the Brits (including my lecturer in experimental particle physics) pronounce it "kwark". And btw, I have a PhD in physics too.

Most of the ATLAS and CMS people I've spoken with have pronounced it kwark. I'm in the US so these are mostly americans as well.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (2, Funny)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732982)

Both are correct as long as you mean kwork as kw-orc. If you mean that like kw-irk, then that's the word quirk, which has a very different meaning.

Re:Way to be taken seriously.. (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733004)

I have no idea if it's right, but I pronounce it like the name of the Ferengi in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Wrong, astronomers use fiction all the time ... (5, Insightful)

AHumbleOpinion (546848) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732986)

If you want to be taken seriously as an astronomer then might I suggest not comparing your research to fictional works

Your suggestion is laughable, astronomers use fiction all the time. Consider the names of the planets, some constellations, etc. I apologize if you believe in the greek/roman gods, you have to consider that most of us consider them fictional. ;-)

Re:Wrong, astronomers use fiction all the time ... (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733240)

In addition, some astronomers even write science fiction. :)

  (That begs a question: Do theoretical physicists write science fiction? Outside of work, I mean? ;-) )

SB

Alternative viewpoint. (2, Insightful)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733122)

If you want to relate to the masses, instead of assuming everyone who might be interested in your work has a degree in astrophysics, you might compare your research to fictional works easily recognized in society.

SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732668)

_0_
\''\
'=o='
.|!|
.| |
click here for exclusive pics of deadly hole [goatse.ch]

Re:SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733170)

(====8

One flaw... (3, Funny)

downix (84795) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732674)

When those pesky x-wings fly down and shoot the exhaust vent....

Re:One flaw... (2, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732828)

Dude, it's no bigger than a womprat.. there's no way.

Re:One flaw... (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733204)

Yeah, but can you imagine trying to find something as small as a womprat in hidden somewhere in billions of cubic light years? ;)

SB

Also received in the footage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732676)

Was a barely heard whisper of "Ooops, I'm sorry. Ate too many beans."

The astronomers explained (5, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732678)

that they could not nail down the exact nature of the exotic object giving off the deadly beam, but they did offer that "that's no moon"

Re:The astronomers explained (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732844)

OK. That is hilarious. Good one :)

Re:The astronomers explained (1)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733410)

I'm more concerned with the fact that they describe the Jet protocol as deadly.

That is no Blackhole (-1, Redundant)

OmegaBlac (752432) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732688)

It's a battle station!

Re:That is no Blackhole (1)

gnarlyhotep (872433) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732816)

It's a trap!

Re:That is no Blackhole (1)

Zalbik (308903) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732888)

Full reverse! Chewie, lock in the auxiliary power.

Re:That is no Blackhole (1)

bckrispi (725257) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733238)

-1 "Telekinetic Force Choke" for botching one of the most well-know lines in cinematic history...

Eminent domain... (5, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732708)

This is what happens when you're not willing to move your galaxy out of the path of a new intergalactic highway. Please don't complain about not knowing about it. The drawings been available in the next galaxy over for ages now.

Re:Eminent domain... (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733224)

And now that the next galaxy over is a whole lot closer, it's not like it's a long trip anymore. Lazy sentients.

SB

Crap. (1)

gl12 (1164635) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732720)

Next thing you know we'll hear about Ewoks and from there it's just a tiny step to Jar Jar and the franchise is ruined!

Old news (5, Funny)

jonfr (888673) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732722)

This is old news, this did happen 1.4 billion years ago.

Re:Old news (4, Interesting)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733324)

And considering that the major damage to any inhabited planets that may have been there would have been radiation effects, one has to wonder if there's any intelligent species over there digging up 1.4 billion year old, relatively undamaged artifacts on their planets surfaces right now ;)

  (Disclaimer: I'm not saying we've found any here on Earth, just that it's interesting to speculate about)

  We'll never know...

SB

Re:Old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733478)

You must be new here.

Muppets (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732724)

Sharks in Spaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaace!

Or was that pigs?

Won't someone think of the aliens?!! (3, Funny)

Mistshadow2k4 (748958) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732750)

Fortunately, the cosmic violence is a safe distance from our own neck of the cosmos.

That doesn't help the poor aliens living in that neck of the cosmos, you insensitive clod!

Re:Won't someone think of the aliens?!! (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733604)

Since your sig file brings up Santa and oral sex in the same breath... a joke for you:

---

Santa was caught by surprise when delivering gifts to a house.

"Hey little girl, what are you doing awake at this hour?"

"Oh, Santa, I've been waiting all year for you. Please stay a while."

"Ho-ho-ho, gotta goooh gotta goohh. Gotta deliver these toys you know?"

She played with her night gown, pulling it tight... "Please, Santa, don't go..."

"Ho-ho-ho, gotta goooh gotta goohh. Gotta deliver these toys you know?"

She played more with her night gown, pulling it tighter... In sultry voice, she said, "Please, Santa, don't go... I need you, so bad... Won't you stayyyy...?"

"Ho-ho-ho, gotta goooh gotta goohh. Gotta deliver these toys you know?"

She slinked up to Santa and slithered up and down his leg, purring, "But, Santa, I really, really need you...Ahhhh..."

"Ho-ho-ho, gotta goooh gotta goohh. Gotta deliver these toys you know?"

"Santa, ohhhh, Santa...."

"Hey, hey, hey... Gotta stay, gotta stay. Can't go up the CHIMney my DICK this way!"

(My brother told me this one when we were teens, like ages ago... I think he learned it at Catholic School when I was in the 7th grade...)

Oh no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732752)

Cue the "That's no moon" comments

Obligatory (0, Redundant)

Zephurus (1204434) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732756)

That's no moon..

Re:Obligatory (1)

dotgain (630123) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733136)

... as if on cue.

Message Beamed across the Universe (0)

EEPROMS (889169) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732758)

"Sucks to be you"

I, for one... (-1, Redundant)

gbulmash (688770) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732772)

... welcome our "death-star-like" beam of energy spouting supermassive black hole overlords.

- Greg

Could you imagine ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732866)

a Beowulf cluster of these energy spouting supermassive black holes ?

Re:I, for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733576)

yawn

Dude, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732788)

Say it, don't spray it.

maybe we won't wreck earth before the big flash (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732814)

we'll obviously need some help, as the spiritdead corepirate nazi execrable appears driven to that end.

in the end game, the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in.

some 'races' we'll wish we lost;

for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it?

we're intending for the nazis to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather'.

http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying [google.com]

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continues on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US;

gov. bush denies health care for the little ones

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html [cnn.com]

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html [cnn.com]

all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

whilst (yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece [timesonline.co.uk]

still making his views known worldwide, whilst many of US keep yOUR heads firmly lodged up yOUR infactdead.asp(s) hoping (against overwhelming information to the contrary) that the party LIEn scriptdead pr ?firm? fairytail hypenosys scenario will never end.

for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available after the big flash occurs.

'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

No anomalies detected (2, Interesting)

Stan Vassilev (939229) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732854)

That would indirectly suggest that in this galaxy there was no sufficiently advanced life that would detect, and try to protect itself, or stop, said "death ray".

Some people believe the universe is chock full of life, but this one is score for the skeptics. I remain a cautious optimist.

Re:No anomalies detected (4, Insightful)

magarity (164372) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733046)

sufficiently advanced life that would detect, and try to protect itself, or stop, said "death ray"
 
If there's a civilization that can shut down supermassive black holes at will then we'd know about it by now. Either because we're on the menu or we're needed to help clean the sewer mains on the black-hole-shutting-down supership.

Re:No anomalies detected (4, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733066)

Riight. Who says this black hole blasting a galaxy isn't exactly the kind of megaengineering we've been looking for?

Re:No anomalies detected (1)

Shados (741919) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733154)

Well, the Earth is pretty chock full of life, and if that thing aimed for us, we'd be amazingly screwed.

Maybe its not even technologicaly and physically possible to protect yourself from something like that. At best, if there was a super high tech civilisation in that galaxy, they got their alien asses out of there. But even then, someone correct me if I'm wrong, but even if you have a ship capable of light speed, you better have had that technology LONG before the ray hit the galaxy to make it out in time...

Unfortunately, the universe has constraints, some of which, assuming we are right about them, can't easily be defied through technology, theoriticaly speaking..

Re:No anomalies detected (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733288)

Simple, really. You just need a ring made of scrith.

Re:No anomalies detected (1)

Mopatop (690958) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733316)

you better have had that technology LONG before the ray hit the galaxy to make it out in time...
Not really. They could have detected it long before it. I believe you can observe these bursts directly, and if you can't, there are other ways in which they could have known about it.

Re:No anomalies detected (1)

flappinbooger (574405) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733402)

Reminds me of an old "outer limits" episode where this astronomy-geek kid finds a seti-type signal which causes all teenagers to mutate in such a way to protect them from some change in the sun which would have otherwise killed them. Yeah, that's a long sentence.

Re:No anomalies detected (1)

Xerloq (809159) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733394)

I detected it, and I left. Seriously though - given that we are the most advanced civilization we know of (narcissists), what are we doing to evade all the NEOs that can/will hit the Earth. Using the same logic, there must not be any intelligent life in Hawaii, as parts of that island are routinely destroyed by molten lava. Just goes to show you.

Re:No anomalies detected (5, Insightful)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733646)

That would indirectly suggest that in this galaxy there was no sufficiently advanced life that would detect, and try to protect itself, or stop, said "death ray".

Um, dude? That "death ray" has a significant scale relative to the size of a galaxy, all of it traveling at (x-rays, gamma rays) or close to (electrons) the speed of light. For one any species caught in its path wouldn't see it until it hit them, and two even if they knew about the beam it isn't clear that they could do anything about it except hide underground for thousands of years or bug out to another part of the galaxy, which itself would require faster-than-light travel. To actually redirect or shield themselves from the beam at a degree that would be visible in our telescopes would require technology on a scale that we can't even dream of.

I find it highly odd that you would be skeptical of the existence of life arising elsewhere in the universe (which while we have no idea what exactly it takes, we know is possible because it has happened at least once), because of the apparent lack of faster than light travel (which according to our current theories is impossible) or even more miraculous feats of what amount to complete science fiction. We can't say that it could ever even be theoretically possible to be "sufficiently advanced" to pull off what you propose, much less if humanity could ever attain it.

Have you seen the Hubble Deep Field [hubblesite.org] ? That's an extremely narrow view of the sky, and it's completely stuffed with galaxies. And because this one particular galaxy has not, as far as we can tell, birthed a civilization with Q-like [wikipedia.org] powers, you're questioning whether there could be life anywhere else out there at all? That's literally the oddest form of skepticism I've ever heard.

Unless this is just dead-pan humor. I'll admit that I have problems detecting it when done with subtlety.

Real Leap forward: Telescopes (5, Interesting)

writerjosh (862522) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732864)

We often take for granted when we see these cool renditions of distant space that these images are only possible when based on the leaps and bounds made with various telescopes over the last 50+ years:

"Only now by combining the images of radio telescopes, the optical and ultraviolet eyes of Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, can researchers put together the entire violent story about this intergalactic mugging.

The coordinated use of such an array of diverse and powerful telescopes is one of the unheralded triumphs of modern physics, Tyson said. "This is an example of the triumph of that exercise." http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/12/17/galaxy-black-hole-02.html [discovery.com]

Just the fact that we can observe such a dramatic event is awe-inspiring.

Re:Real Leap forward: Telescopes (1)

TheLazySci-FiAuthor (1089561) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733082)

Our eyes are so amazingly beyond any other organism's, that I say humans have abilities which are truly cosmic in scale. Think of the most powerful biological eye - probably a hawk or eagle's - and then compare the light-gathering and resolving power of it to the resolution and light gathered from an astronomical observation. It is a truly stellar distance, the separation.

Yes, the biological human eye does not compare, but I consider our technology to be a part of us. After all, humans aren't really that well equipped by default - we don't survive without our technology and therefore I consider our technology to be as much a part of us as a colony is a part of the ant organism.

And yet with this power of sight, this ability to see the dangers of this universal landscape, we still seem to lack the foresight to compare. I guess it is easier to increase our vision than to have increased vision.

Re:Real Leap forward: Telescopes (1)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733270)

Agreed. Though, of course, each instrument has its special field of applicability.

  Human eyes are amazing, but really only have much acuity in the fovea centralis (thus microsaccades). Horses' eyes don't have the acuity we do in the center of their visual fields, but their relatively high-resolution field extends considerably father than ours. We don't have tapeta; many other animals have much better night-vision than we do. Many birds can see a ways into the ultraviolet regions; many insects and other arthropods can see farther. Pit-vipers are sensitive to infrared radiation; sharks, skates, and rays can sense nearly DC fields; migrating birds may be able to do something similar. Crabs (if I remember something I read a long while ago), due to their 10^4 compound eyes, may be able to sense movements as slight as that of the sun's movement across the sky.

      To each his own. Naturally (sic) you may argue that we've incorporated all of these amazing sensors into our own technologies. To even be able to recognize the animals' abilities we much have at least partially achieved them ourselves.

Re:Real Leap forward: Telescopes (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733284)

The capabilities of our technology are leaping far ahead of our understanding. There, shortened that for you :)

  Technology is fast, evolution is slow.

SB

Re:Real Leap forward: Telescopes (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733164)

In other news, a clandestine Rebellion broadcast announced the deployment of a Super-Super-Super-Super-Super-Super Death Star in response to the Imperial deployment of the Super-Super-Super-Super-Super Death Star. Unfortunately, life thruout the galaxy was snuffed out before any official Imperial comment on the claim could be *NO CARRIER*

SB

Re:Real Leap forward: Telescopes (1)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733602)

Luckily, you said, "In other news...". Therefore, any mods which think you're off-topic are automatically wrong! You've done a brilliant thing.

I'll tell you what else... (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733188)

Quote: Just the fact that we can observe such a dramatic event is awe-inspiring.

I find the ever-increasing application of computing power to analyzing these sorts of problems, coupled with the incredible global communications flexibility we have today, to be pretty awe-inspiring. We've come a long way from dialing into BBSes; I can't wait to see what the next 10 years brings for research.

Re:I'll tell you what else... (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733630)

And, depending on where one grows up, or from where one obtains an astrophysics degree, it can be....

Aw(r)e-inspiring....

And, to 7String's

"exactly what you think it means. I guess it was interstellar "fajitas night" or something."

It might have been intergalactic "Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar-Bell", or

"Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tacar Tachyon-Bell" (The old 80's Taco Bell TV advert...)

Re:Real Leap forward: Telescopes (1)

TigerNut (718742) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733330)

Unfortunate that at least some of that coordinated effort is slated to be decommissioned in the next little while... with both the Hubble and Arecibo (the latter not specifically named, but they did use the VLA radiotelescope) being punted, how much of this capability will we lose?

It could happen to us (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732868)

http://people.roma2.infn.it/~aldo/dar01.pdf [roma2.infn.it]

Eta Carinae - a large blue variable star in the Carina constelation, more than 100 times as massive and 5 million times as radiant as the Sun ... If pointing in our direction a GRB from Eta Carinae, ... would devistate life on Earth.


Since we are moving around within our galaxy, it is possible that we will move into the line of fire of something like this. Of course, I am much more worried about being mowed down by a drunk driver than being zapped by a nearby star.

Re:It could happen to us (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#21732904)

I think the difference betwenn Eta Carina and the death galaxy is that the size of the blackhole is much larger than the resultant Eta blackhole would be, and hence would be unable to beam that much energy torwards us.

Re:It could happen to us (1)

chmod a+x mojo (965286) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733528)

So you are saying it is better to be microwaved on "low" than the "high" setting?
At least on "high" you would probably not feel it as much.

That was the "kawoosh" of a super stargate the ori (0)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 5 years ago | (#21732918)

That was the "kawoosh" of a super stargate the ori may be coming are way.

So this is the space version of a facial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733030)

I can just see the movie title: "Black Holes and White Galaxies who Like Being Spurted On".

the universe could get caught in a drive-by (4, Insightful)

mrpeebles (853978) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733068)

The space age is great. It lets us all see that we live on the same small world. One that could, in princple, be accidently blown up by a careless, nearby black hole.

Re:the universe could get caught in a drive-by (0, Troll)

fm6 (162816) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733588)

Dude, this black hole destroyed a whole galaxy. If that happened in our galaxy, having colonized a few extra planets would do nothing to ensure the survival of the species. Let's focus on the threats we can do something about. Which are mostly the threats we ourselves created!

tag: ohshi (1)

xyph0r (1153429) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733124)

How long before something like this happens in our 'neck of the cosmos'?

It's an evil scientist! (1)

Eternal Annoyance (815010) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733128)

What better hideout to build your death-ray then a black hole?
Granted, things might be a bit crammed... but that shouldn't be much of a problem.

Re:It's an evil scientist! (1)

OnlineAlias (828288) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733462)

We shall call it, "The Alan Parson's Project..."

In Russian, "Black Hole" means... (1)

7String (537730) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733140)

exactly what you think it means. I guess it was interstellar "fajitas night" or something.

Distant Effects (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733150)

The effects of the blast were seen to be evident as far away as here [myminicity.com]

I give it 48 hours before we feel the effects... (1, Funny)

jpellino (202698) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733202)

...which will consist of Rush Limbaugh figuring out a way to pin this on the Clintons, and Dennis Kucinich formulating a plan to deal with it...

1.4 billion light years (4, Interesting)

ConcreteJungle (1177207) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733254)

The article states: Both galaxies are situated about 1.4 billion light-years away from Earth.

and then goes on with: The offending galaxy probably began assaulting its companion about 1 million years ago...

If the distance is 1.4 billion light years, light from the event should be taking that much time to reach us, and something that happened only a million years ago should not be visible yet.

What am I missing here?

Re:1.4 billion light years (1)

Mopatop (690958) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733360)

The ability to apply common sense? The assault started 1.401 billions years ago. I hope you're just being facetious.

Re:1.4 billion light years (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733398)


  I run into this question a lot, so I don't think he was being facetious.

  (Usually I don't answer it wrong, doh, thanks) ;0

SB

Re:1.4 billion light years (4, Informative)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733370)

The collision began about 1.5 billion years ago, about one million years before we observed it. The estimate is based off the two galaxies motion relative to each other.

  It's just imprecise language. :)

SB

Bad tag (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733302)

Don't tase me, dude?

ummm (1)

quickpick (1021471) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733390)

butterwise writes to mention that astronomers have, for the first time, witnessed a super-massive black hole hitting a nearby galaxy with a "death-star-like" beam of energy.
Meanwhile Icantbelieveitsnotbutter states that all astronomers are starwars geeks but not all starwars geeks are astronomers.
The story also has a video with simulations, pictures, and explanations.
OK I made a mistake, all astronomers are starwars uber-geeks...

He who hath smelt it may have dealt it, but thou shalt remember that which is silent may also be violent.

WTF ... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21733498)

... is "jet from supermassive black holes"?

I always thought no particle/energy can escape the event horizon of a black hole.

Please explain.

Re:WTF ... (4, Informative)

CroDragn (866826) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733578)

You're correct, they can't (though lookup black hole evaporation for a way matter "exits" a black hole w/o actually crossing the event horizon). However, as matter circles the black hole prior to actually falling into it's event horizon it becomes superheated and a great deal of radiation is shot off from both the holes poles prior to the matters actual disappearance into the event horizon.

Carl Sagan didn't take that into account... (1)

rholland356 (466635) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733546)

Dang. One black hole can blast an entire galaxy?!

It's a wonder we are here at all...

I dunno, man.... (1)

hanakj (164293) | more than 6 years ago | (#21733614)

I've got a bad feeling about this.....
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>