Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

NCAA Puts Severe Limits On Sport Event Blogging

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the because-commentary-isn't-appropriate-for-sporting-events dept.

Censorship 185

An anonymous reader writes "You would think that the NCAA would be thrilled to have reporters live blogging events in order to generate more interest and keep passionate fans talking about NCAA sports. Not so. The governing body of the NCAA has released new rules for receiving press credentials and it includes severe limits on live blogging. If you're covering NCAA football, make sure you don't blog more than 3 times in a single quarter. If it's baseball, one post an inning is all you get. If you don't follow the rules expect to get ejected and have your press credentials pulled."

cancel ×

185 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

What are these "sports" you speak of? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21768826)

Is it something like... chess?

Re:What are these "sports" you speak of? (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769480)

You stole my joke. [slashdot.org]

Meh.

Bullshit (1)

ThinkingInBinary (899485) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768828)

That's total bullshit. Either nobody will obey the rules, or nobody will blog anymore. I don't care one way or the other.

Also, NCAA, shoot yourself in the foot much?

Re:Bullshit (5, Funny)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769066)

Maybe they should adopt an even more restrictive information model to drum up more live interest, like the model of Brockian Ultra-Cricket where not only is there no reporting on the game, you can't even see the game when you attend it!

Take it to the next level: completely seal up the arena so no one can observe the game other than the players and you'll have the Wide World of Schrödinger Sports!

Re:Bullshit (1)

chakan2 (1106731) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769420)

Since both teams win every game, does that mean I always win my bets? I guess I'd really get hosed on odds though. On a better note, the Cubs would finally have a shot.

Re:Bullshit (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21770246)

Since both teams win every game, does that mean I always win my bets? I guess I'd really get hosed on odds though. On a better note, the Cubs would finally have a shot.
Actually, you can't say if either team won or lost, both teams exist in this sort of fuzzy won-and-lost state. Unless somebody breaks the cyanide capsule hidden in the arena, then everybody loses.

Re:Bullshit (4, Funny)

iamdrscience (541136) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769176)

Also, NCAA, shoot yourself in the foot much?
They can't help it, they're the NCAA and as we all know on Slashdot, all organizations ending in "AA" are prone to shooting themselves in the foot by creating new rules/laws.

obligatory AA remark (1)

wikinerd (809585) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769610)

Don't let the US of A become the US of AA!

Re:Bullshit (4, Funny)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769258)

NCAA, shoot yourself in the foot much?

The NCAA deals more with balls than feet, making the shot far more painful.

-mcgrew

Re:Bullshit (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769978)

That's total bullshit. Either nobody will obey the rules, or nobody will blog anymore. I don't care one way or the other.

Exactly. Who the fuck are these lunatics who are so infatuated with extravagantly overpaid adults playing children's games that they have to be hooked to their electronic tits while pissing away time watching this crap?

Get fucking real -- instead of sitting on your fat ass, spend the $100 you pay for a ticket on something real, like feeding a family who has no idea where their next meal is coming from.

Self-indulgent bastards -- players, owners and spectators alike -- fuck them all.

Destroy the sports establishment. All these shits have to offer is teaching kids to drug up and cheat to get ahead in life. Put all these assholes to work building society, not tearing it down for their own self-aggrandizement.

Re:Bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21770274)

Yeah, just give all you have for some poor African kids that had the bad luck to have a father who disliked condoms and didn't believe in AIDS.

Yeah yeah. Don't breed 'em if you can't feed 'em. Call me selfish, but I barely manage to fulfill my own needs, those of my family and my employer. And with the tiny bits of money left, I do whatever the hell I like to do. If people live in the middle of the desert with no food, no shelter, no water and no nothing, they should at first improve their surroundings and situation before having kids.

Re:Bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21770044)

While it may be unenforcable or difficult to enforce, it makes perfect sense. While you are all screaming and whining about censorship, they, no doubt, are looking at it from a marketing point of view. There is such a thing as market saturation. Over saturating consumers with ads, info, promos, coverage, on any goods, services, or news story, makes those consumers less interested.

How many of you were still interested in the OJ trial, or Anna Nicole, or Britney Spears, or Paris Hilton, or Michael Jackson, etc. after the first week of non-stop coverage?

£5 says (5, Funny)

Malevolent Tester (1201209) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768834)

The baseball bloggers start compiling meticulous statistics on ejection averages.

Re:£5 says (3, Funny)

BZWingZero (1119881) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769354)

Don't you mean injection averages?

How do they expect to detect this ? (2, Interesting)

aepervius (535155) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768852)

I mean, if I am joe-everybody, and got somehow a pda with wireless connection in a stadium or mobile phone+internet, how can they even hope to stop me writing post in a blog (or even a normal html web page) on the exciting match I am just watching ? I can't see anything copyrighted here (describing an event in writing) where they could even stops me, would not it ? Less even detect at which seating I am ?

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (3, Insightful)

pipatron (966506) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768996)

They might take your equipment before you are allowed entrance to the event. Wouldn't be surprised if this happens.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

Oktober Sunset (838224) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769472)

I'd like to see them take the mobile phones off 90000 fans.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769686)

I'd like to see them take the mobile phones off 90000 fans.


No problem. Just put out a signal strong enough to block the cell phone signal. The people can still keep their phones, just not get a signal to use them.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (2, Insightful)

NNKK (218503) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769820)

Which would be a violation of federal law.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769980)

So do it passively. Cover all domes in copper mesh.

Copper's cheap these days. I mean I have a ton laying around my house in little round circles. Just cover the entire dome in those.

And when it costs $XX Million per arena, somehow blame revenue going down on the bloggers. Find some way that you can use the patriot Act or DMCA against said bloggers.

It's the AA-merican way.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

strength_of_10_men (967050) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770210)

except copper's not so cheap anymore. [kitconet.com]

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770448)

Slashdot filtered my [sarcasm] blocks. I know copper's expensive. As everyone should.

I also know pennies aren't solid copper.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770512)

Which is exactly why you should adopt my new punctuation mark:
the Sarcasm: ~

Seen in such place as my posts, and currently enjoying exclusive ownership of my sig.

It's going to be the next Pet Rock~

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769656)

One of the selling points of some stadiums is Wifi all over. Take the San Francisco Giant's baseball stadium.

http://sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com/sf/ballpark/wifi.jsp [mlb.com]

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769960)

Besides, who needs a 'press pass' to do a blog?!?!?

If you bring in a laptop, especially to use their free wifi....how the hell will they know what you're doing? Connect to your home server via ssh, and they'll never see the traffic you're generating either...

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (2, Funny)

jayhawk88 (160512) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769000)

This is the same organization that is used to discovering how many phone calls a coach's assistant made to a recruits uncle between the months of April and August from 4 years ago. Trust me, they've got no problem sweating the details.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (5, Insightful)

bcattwoo (737354) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769022)

And how are they going to take away your press credentials that you never had? This isn't for joe-everybody, it is for people with press credentials.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (2, Informative)

rujholla (823296) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769064)

They are talking about pulling offenders press passes -- so these are rules for people who are getting in under their rules to begin with. Not the guy in the stand blogging about the great game.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (4, Informative)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769072)

"Less even detect at which seating I am ?"

I think you miss the point. The only seating they are concerned with here is the press box (and anywhere else press credentials will get you like the sidelines in some cases). If you're going to blog from the stands, then no they can't stop you but if you're going to use your blog to become a card-carrying member of the press and get into the event on their dime, then you're going to play by their rules. Generally speaking they will be keeping an eye on you in that case. They're kind of stupid rules but at least bloggers can get press credentials for NCAA events.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (5, Insightful)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769102)

It's targeted at people with press credentials. If you have press credentials, you probably aren't sitting in the stands. You are probably in the press area. And since you have applied for and received these credentials, they know who you are.

How would they detect it? By checking your blog probably.

Can they stop Joe Everybody from doing it? As a practical matter, probably not. And they probably aren't too worried about Joe Everybody (at least not yet). As for the legal issues, I don't see a problem with it. It's their game, and they set the rules. If you break the rules, they kick you out.

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (1)

jaredmauch (633928) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769290)

Actually most tickets have a license printed on the back of them, much like that wonderful EULA you clicked 'Accept' to get past. Includes stuff like you won't sue if a puck/ball injure you, etc.. Take a closer look next time you attend an event. Perhaps you're not one to attend these events and are busy hiding under your LED lights in your basement :) Either way, the limits are technically there. The fact that nobody has a laptop typing as they are doing the wave is something else...

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769976)

Just cause it says you won't sue doesn't mean it is enforceable. They could put in that you have to give them your first born if you want to enter the game but I don't think it would hold up in court even if you bought the ticket anyway and went to the game. IANAL but if you fell through the floor of the stadium and hurt yourself due to their blatant negligence of making the floor out of concrete colored cardboard instead of concrete I would bet you could sue regardless of what the ticket stub said. ;) It's up to the courts to decide the fair use of seeing events. Can you not talk about the game with your friends more than 5 minutes out of every day after the fact? I am sure there are limits to what the courts will decide you the attendee can be limited too. Of course if all this meant less baseball in the news and on the net that would be fine by me. ;)

Re:How do they expect to detect this ? (2, Informative)

Luscious868 (679143) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770254)

How do they expect to detect this ?

If you want to get press credentials then you've got to follow the rules. I'm sure part of the process of applying for the credentials involves letting the NCAA know which site you write for and as such they could check to see how many times you post to that site if they want to.

Since this only applies to bloggers with press credentials, you can do whatever you damn well please if you just buy a ticket and sit in the stands like everybody else. Of course, good luck doing live blogging from the stands of a college football game when it's raining or snowing.

Idiot at the wheel (1)

HangingChad (677530) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768872)

This is so retarded it's hard to find the right words to express the expanse of stupidity it represents. Not to mention the 20,000 or so people in the stands texting and emailing pictures. Or are they going to take everyone's cell phone away and frisk them at the door?

Maybe I shouldn't give them any ideas.

Who needs press credentials? (4, Interesting)

Itchyeyes (908311) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768882)

What exactly does the NCAA hope to accomplish by revoking press credentials when just about anyone can blog from anywhere with nothing more than a smart phone? Will the NCAA then start revoking peoples' cellphones at the gates? This move just reeks of idiocy.

Re:Who needs press credentials? (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769222)

Simple. By making the press creds for bloggers so draconian a burden that nobody accepts them, they avoid pissing off the big boys who like to believe they are special simply because they have press credentials and you, the huddled masses, don't.

That's all this is. Nothing to see here. Move along.

Did you even read the summary? (1)

spun (1352) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769356)

This only applies to the big boys who want to receive press credentials. This does not apply to some fan blogging from the stands.

Follow the money (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769612)

The inclination to control what people do with the information at their disposal usually boils down to the elimination of information outlets which do not ultimately put money in the pockets of those who are trying to control said information.

I am not familiar with this particular money trail, but I would speculate that there exist some specific, approved websites which give to-the-minute updates of the game's progress. They would be popularly known by sports fans.

And they would have ad banners.

If the fans can go to a banner-free blog site (or even a different site with different ad banners) then money isn't flowing to the pockets of the established partner-vendors. That cannot be tolerated, even if it means sacrificing some degree of publicity.

Re:Follow the money (1)

jahudabudy (714731) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770278)

That is an excellent point, AC. However, the revenue is more direct than that - the two services I have heard of are subscription based. I suspect there are still ads, however. *Disclaimer: I have never used these services, but have heard them described by friends that live outside the viewing area for their favorite college teams.

Re:Who needs press credentials? (2, Interesting)

fallen1 (230220) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770324)

This move just reeks of idiocy.

No, this move just reeks of GREED. Almost every time someone, especially a corporate or commercial interest, attempts to limit the freedom of information about them then you should start sniffing for dollars because they are doing so in an attempt to keep the money themselves. Greed is going to be the downfall of many old-school, established businesses and/or their processes even though it may take a while. Just look at the RIAA and MPAA for examples - unless they can somehow overcame their stuck-in-a-rut attitudes and progress into the current year then they are going to be overrun sooner or later by a business model that can adapt to the times.

I've used the following quote before, but it seems appropriate again here:

As the Americans learned so painfully in Earth's final century, free flow of information is the only safeguard against tyranny. The once-chained people whose leaders at last lose their grip on information flow will soon burst with freedom and vitality, but the free nation gradually constricting its grip on public discourse has begun its rapid slide into despotism. Beware of he who would deny you access to information, for in his heart he dreams himself your master. -- Commissioner Pravin Lal, "U.N. Declaration of Rights"

In this case, the NCAA wants to master all communications about the game. In some ways, this is their right since they own the "copyright" on the game in question. On the other hand, live blogging adds a new dimension to what has become a rote exercise (TV coverage, radio coverage, and print media coverage) and gives new life to sports coverage - imho. Still, I believe that money and greed is behind this move. Send in the bloodhounds and start sniffing...

NCAA has a habit of making bonehead moves (2, Interesting)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768888)

This coming from the group that put Florida State on notice [msn.com] for appearance in bowl games because of its mascot but made no mention of Notre Dame's? Somehow I'm not surprised.

Re:NCAA has a habit of making bonehead moves (1)

JKSN17 (956518) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769028)

I agree completely, I mean NCAA football uses the BCS. What more proof do we need that they have absolutely no idea what they are doing? Bring on the playoff system...

Riiiiightt,.... (1)

JKSN17 (956518) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768890)

Because reading a blog that is five minutes behind the real action, is really a great alternative to watching the game live or listening to a play-by-play....I'm sure they are loosing so much business and revenue.

Re:Riiiiightt,.... (1)

TykeClone (668449) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769262)

Only if you aren't in a position to listen to the game on the radio or watch it somehow.

The Run [youtube.com] - audio on this was from the radio play by play guy. How can this be compared to what a blogger can type during the game - "Seneca Wallace runs from sideline to sideline for a 12 yard touchdown"

Re:Riiiiightt,.... (1)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769706)

psst - fellow Cyclone here...BSME '97 :)

Re:Riiiiightt,.... (1)

TykeClone (668449) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769886)

I was at that game kind on that end of the field. Never gets old watching that! It's just too bad that they couldn't make it over the hump that year.

ComSci '95

Apropos poem (2, Interesting)

Smidge204 (605297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768900)

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains: round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away.


~Percy Bysshe Shelley

=Smidge=

The what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21768922)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCAA [wikipedia.org]

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced "N-C-Double-A" or "N-C-Two-A" ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States.

Want to change this policy? (1)

widget54 (888141) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768946)

Stop watching their events and tell their sponsors why!

It is all a vast right-wing conspiracy (1)

mi (197448) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768958)

To make sure, the torture of cheerleaders is not uncovered. Or something...

This is a good idea too (2, Insightful)

gelfling (6534) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768962)

Because we shouldn't delude ourselves that NCAA isn't a professional sports league.

Yet again, the NCAA does it (1, Interesting)

beavis88 (25983) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768972)

The NCAA has proven once again that there DOES exist an organization that is more idiotic, closed minded, and out of touch with reality than either the MPAA or RIAA could hope to be. Bravo.

Don't Eject Me, Bro (2, Insightful)

rebmemeR (1056120) | more than 6 years ago | (#21768978)

I can watch the game on TV at home or listen on the radio and blog it from home. Does my physically attending the game really help me do a better job of that? Can the NCAA eject me from my house?

Re:Don't Eject Me, Bro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769574)

Why yes, they can.

corepirate nazi FUDgePackers like to control inf.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21768992)

so we learn to see/hear about things in such a way as to avoid any negative realities. the 1000 years of darkness is almost over now. see you there?

Maybe it's time to start questioning... (5, Insightful)

drooling-dog (189103) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769002)

...why educational institutions ought to be in the business of quasi-professional sports in the first place. The tail has been wagging the dog for a long time now, and it's getting worse every year.

Re:Maybe it's time to start questioning... (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769766)

...why educational institutions ought to be in the business of quasi-professional sports in the first place. The tail has been wagging the dog for a long time now, and it's getting worse every year.

Why? Because it makes money -- lots of money to fund all those things that geeks like such as research and scholarships.

Re:Maybe it's time to start questioning... (4, Insightful)

QuasiEvil (74356) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769814)

Agreed - as someone who watched countless *academic* activities suffer every time the various sports programs needed money at my alma matter (despite the countless zillions their rights licensing brought in), I've always thought it was a complete travesty to everything higher education is about. Sports scholarships should be eliminated, and these jocks (at least the ones that are only there to play ball, and not really educate themselves) should go where they belong - minor league teams (which, I might add, the NFL could really use some sort of development league, much like minor league baseball and basketball teams produce players for MLB and the NBA).

I'm probably the only person who actively cheers for whatever team is opposing my old university, just out of sheer hatred for the football program. Yeah, I've got anger issues.

Re:Maybe it's time to start questioning... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769926)

show me on the doll where the bad football player touched your girlfriend at the after-game party.

Re:Maybe it's time to start questioning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769868)

Schools have long been in the business of providing a 'complete' educational experience. They fund the chess team and they fund the football team; the latter simply has more expensive equipment. Is it the school's fault that football is more popular?

Besides, most schools depend in large part on monetary donations from alumni. Sports are one of the best ways they've found to do this. If you've got a better way I'm sure they'd be happy to hear it.

Three words: Follow the money (2, Insightful)

Enlarged to Show Tex (911413) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769020)

Basically, the NCAA is acting like the MPAA in an attempt to limit access to try to restrict the transmission of information with respect to its events, with an onward eye toward selling exclusive access rights to the highest bidder in the MSM.

Hardly surprising from Myles Brand, the guy who made his claim to fame as the guy who fired Bobby Knight at Indiana...as many would say: "Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely."

Break up Trust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769032)

Where's Teddy Roosevelt when you need him? NCAA is a price-fixing organization. It's time for competition, It's time to break them up.

Ask me if I give a shit about their rules (4, Interesting)

davmoo (63521) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769048)

If its a private school, that's one thing. But if I'm at a game involving my local public university, which is supported by my tax dollars, I'm not going to bother getting press credentials, and I'll blog about any damned thing I want during their game. And I'll do it as often as I want. Fuck the NCAA. If they want to restrict my commenting on their sports, then their team's schools do not need my supporting tax dollars. My tax dollars, then its my property too. Period. No exceptions.

(And yes, I feel the same way about a university's research. If that research was paid for by a company, they can control it how ever they like. But if that research was paid for by my tax dollars, then they can take their patent application and shove it up their collective ass.)

Re:Ask me if I give a shit about their rules (4, Insightful)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769186)

I'm not going to bother getting press credentials, and I'll blog about any damned thing I want during their game. And I'll do it as often as I want. Fuck the NCAA.
Maybe I misread the article, but you are free to do exactly what you describe, since you don't have press credentials. No fucking of the NCAA is required. If it were the other way around there'd be a problem (i.e., prohibiting non-credentialed people from phoning/blogging in scores).

Re:Ask me if I give a shit about their rules (3, Insightful)

rhizome (115711) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769826)

If it were the other way around there'd be a problem (i.e., prohibiting non-credentialed people from phoning/blogging in scores).

Do you really think they're unprepared for this? Once the press figures out that you don't need credentials to sit in your seat and tap out blog entries from your phone they're going to start ejecting people for that, too. It'll be the fan-attacking RIAA mess all over again.

Re:Ask me if I give a shit about their rules (1)

rizzo420 (136707) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770016)

didn't some sporting event (or maybe it was some other event) already do that? i seem to remember reading something within the last year, or even the last few months, about someone getting kicked out for live blogging and not having press creds?

Unless (1)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769230)

And yes, I feel the same way about a university's research. If that research was paid for by a company, they can control it how ever they like. But if that research was paid for by my tax dollars, then they can take their patent application and shove it up their collective ass.

Unless they're getting the patent so some corporate entity doesn't patent their idea and make money off of their work. And lock them out of further research.

There are defensive patents, you know.

Re:Ask me if I give a shit about their rules (1)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769266)

It flies in the face of reality, but the NCAA has been held repeatedly to be a non-governmental actor. Meaning that the Bill of Rights does not apply to it.

This, in spite of the fact that most of the member schools are public universities.

NCAA is an Organized Crime entity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769460)

If you blog about your team, they'll beat down your team. They only care about money.

Do you think they will do anything about Reggie Bush getting paid to play? Or the guys at Ohio State?

They know it, but they'll deny it. But they are making so much money on college Athletics, they'll keep the racket going as long as they can. But if you get too uppity, they'll take down your team. Blog about a team you don't like.

Sunbathing on Interstates (0, Offtopic)

dunc78 (583090) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769592)

Wow, interesting post. My tax dollars pay for roads don't they? I am always envious of the snakes that get to sunbath in the road, so you know what, I'm gonna start sunbathing in the road!!! Lets see them kick me off of MY property. Furthermore, before NASA thinks about using my space shuttle again, they better come asking for my permission. I'm tired of them galavanting around the galaxy in MY space shuttle. Another thing I must have missed, are you somehow punishing the NCAA by not getting press credentials? Have you ever had press credentials? You make it sound as if the NCAA would give a damn that you didn't get press credentials, but maybe I am just misinterpreting your rambling post.

Re:Sunbathing on Interstates (1)

davmoo (63521) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769782)

Have you ever had press credentials?

Um...actually...yes, many times. Before I decided on computer programming and support for 100 percent of my "working" time, I also worked as a professional photographer, including news stories.

Re:Sunbathing on Interstates (1)

dunc78 (583090) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770554)

So you skipped the other points I was making, but anyhow... Do you think the NCAA cares that you no longer go to games with press credentials? In your long rant you act as though going to games without credentials is punishing them in some way, I fail to see how.

Re:Sunbathing on Interstates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21770422)

I am always envious of the snakes that get to sunbath in the road, so you know what, I'm gonna start sunbathing in the road!!!

By posting this, you're setting yourself up for a humungous lawsuit. Remember when Beavis and Butthead did the laying-on-the-yellow-line bit? Then the producer got sued because someone's single-digit-IQ kid got killed when he tried the same thing?

Key is "Live" blogging (1)

us7892 (655683) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769062)

For some reason it's the "live", in-person blogging that they don't want. I'm not sure what the issue is here. Is it because many NCAA events are not broadcast, but a "blog" is a "live", or pseudo-live transcript of the event that is not otherwise being seen live? huh? What did I just say?

I don't get the reason behind this...

What's not to get? (1)

TenBrothers (995309) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769540)

The NCAA, simply, sees live blogging as a method of broadcasting. ...and really I don't see how they're wrong at seeing it that way. A major revenue stream for the NCAA revenue stream comes from exclusivity contracts to broadcast. Getting upset that they are shutting down what amounts to major-player blogging is silly. You wouldn't get upset about this if, say, CNN gave a video update of the game, live, every 30 seconds; ESPN (or ABC or whomever paid for TV broadcast rights) *would* get upset. The NCAA is actually more forward-thinking in media than everyone on /. seems to give them credit for; they see the blogs as eroding TV and Radio audiences.

Re:What's not to get? (1)

nanter (613346) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770332)

Except for the fact that anyone who has watched sporting events knows that reading a blog about it is nothing better than a supplement to watching it, or at the very minimum listening to it on the radio. There is no way that blogging can ever directly compete with standard broadcast media, but they can improve the experience for viewers, which you would think the NCAA would want.

"Credentialed" (2, Interesting)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769144)

This covers only credentialed reporters, which makes this a non-issue. Want credentials? Play by their rules. I guess it could breed a new type of papparazzi...the Uncredentialed Sports Blogger.

Not surprising (3, Interesting)

ubrgeek (679399) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769162)

When I was at jacksonville.com (the Florida Times-Union Website) the Jaguars had just come into being. Obviously the local paper was going to cover them. Two issues came up: As part of our server farm, we named our servers, "entertainment.jacksonville.com," "lifestyle.jacksonville.com," "business.jacksonville.com," etc. Because we knew the Jags site would be so popular, we didn't put it on sports.jacksonville.com. Instead it went on jaguars.jacksonville.com. The Jags and the NFL threw a fit, claiming that we were doing it in an effort to capitalize on the names (nevermind that we had server logs from more than a year prior showing our naming convention.) For the outcome, go to http://jaguars.jacksonville.com/ [jacksonville.com] ... It's still being used 10 years later.

The second was they were having a fit because we were shooting pictures of the game and posting them to the site. Not in real-time. After the game. As part of our coverage. Our publisher agreed to stop doing so ... in exchange, the paper wouldn't write any articles about the team.

So there we were, two days later, posting pictures to the site ... ;)

Here in SC. (1)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769216)

Locally a similar story was making the news a few months back. University of South Carolina coach, Steve Spurrier complained that "Them internet boys" were blogging and forum posting about player performance during pre-season practice. The players were reading the posts and the coaching staff felt that it was affecting performance. They decided in turn to bar all non-staff and non-players from practice.

Also it can be viewed as a form of cheating much like the Patriots debacle earlier this year.

Re:Here in SC. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21769562)

I must admit I'm intrigued although I don't follow any sports. It's probably the word "debacle" that cinched it. So.. what is this "Patriots debacle" you speak of?

Re:Here in SC. (1)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769828)

A video assistant for the New England Patriots was video taping the hand signals that the NY Jets were using, essentially spying. Though it doesn't relate specifically to blogging, I can see why having bloggers hang around would make coaches, staff and players nervous.
http://www-tech.mit.edu/V127/N42/patriots.html/ [mit.edu]

very misleading (2, Insightful)

snarkh (118018) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769238)

From the FA:

Now, before anyone goes screaming censorship or free speech or anything along those lines -- these are the rules that the NCAA is setting for credentialed reporters. And, as a private organization, the NCAA can set whatever rules it wants for handing out credentials, no matter how mind-numbingly stupid they may be.


Re:very misleading (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769308)

Misleading enough that, so far, 90% of the /. comments missed that whole part.

Re:very misleading (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770362)

So? People also have the right to scream about censorship;which this is. That's not to say they are outside there rights to censor, but lets call it what it is.

Guess how rules get change? people complain about them.

Idiocy must be caused by something (1)

Skeptical1 (823232) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769306)

in the initials.

Other NCAA Forbidden Items (3, Interesting)

deweycheetham (1124655) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769332)

Welcome to the world of the Fighting Illini at the University of Illinois.

The NCAA has outlawed any pictures or representations of our Mascot. Take a look and you can see why (if you can't, your in sensitive clod).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e6/Illinilogo.png [wikimedia.org]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a2/2006-11-11_-_Chief_Illiniwek.jpg/200px-2006-11-11_-_Chief_Illiniwek.jpg [wikimedia.org]

Pro or amateur sports? (4, Insightful)

fermion (181285) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769370)

One issue that has come up is the issue of whether the kids playing should have the protection we usually give kids, or if they should be treated like the pro players, or somewhere in between. On thing that is clear is that many NCAA players do receive some kind of compensation in excess of room, board, and classes normally awarded the top scholar, though likely not near the compensation of a pro player. Rules such as these also makes it clear that the NCAA itself behaves more like a pro sports organization than an amateur venue. On cannot, for instance, imagine an amateur musician, actor, athlete, or other entertainer limiting the press coverage of their act. The only people who wish to limit such coverage are those pro organization who need to monetize every score, stat, call, play, and image to generate the profits needed to support a pro organization.

This is why I think the distinction is important. If the NCAA is an amateur organization, then we can forgive the situation when some of the member athletes do something stupid, like hire a stripper and serve beer to underage players, then do not have the maturity to excise themselves in a graceful way. But if they are not amateurs, of if NCAA wants to have the privileges affords pro sports, then they must also take on some of the responsibilities. Which means no one can call fowl when the players, even though they are kids, and have their names plastered across all the papers everytime they do something stupid. One cool thing about college is that one can get away with stuff one could never get away with on the outside. The side thing is that kids are accepting these high levels of responsibility without even thinking of the freedoms they are giving up.

And we GIVE them monopoly privileges!!! (1)

0x1b (979991) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769392)

It is time for congress to revoke the exemption these corporations get from our monopoly laws.

Blogging Gerund Fun (3, Funny)

Adambomb (118938) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769396)

Calvin certainly said it best.

Verbing weirds language.

NCAA cares only about money (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769428)

"You would think that the NCAA would be thrilled to have reporters live blogging events in order to generate more interest and keep passionate fans talking about NCAA sports."

If they really wanted to keep fans passionate about NCAA football, they'd institute a playoff system in Division I. Every other division manages to have a playoff during exams, and the basketball players seem to do just fine throughout all of spring mid-terms while on on the road 4-5 days a week for a month. No, it's about money - not interest. Money comes from control, and control is what they are exerting here. I'm sure that you can buy a license to blog real-time, it would just cost more (up to and possibly including the price of full broadcast rights).

self-organise (1)

wikinerd (809585) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769738)

Why do you need NCAA anyway? And why specifically do you need to play or watch games they are associated with? Do they have a copyright on baseball or whatever? No. So, you can play your own baseball and ignore their games whenever this is practical and possible.

Bloggers who write about NCAA games would do a much more useful service to their favourite sports if they mobilised people to play alternative games outside the jurisdiction of NCAA.

Software users do the same with free software. Music listeners do the same with freely licensed music. Why not do the same with sports as well? If an authority claims ownership of sports data or coverage, just avoid to be subjected to said authority by running your own games.

Wy watch overpaid ignoramouses excercise? (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769804)

It's bad enough to flush 2-4hrs of your life down the toilet sitting in an armchair entranced by Hi-Def beads of sweat. The laughable part is paying multiple 100's of dollars to corporations that have little to no interest in treating anyone fairly for the "privilege". Not that the players are paragons of virtue. A pox upon them all.

Re:Wy watch overpaid ignoramouses excercise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21770164)

Leave your parents basement at least once a month, k?

Water polo Blogging (1)

Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) | more than 6 years ago | (#21769974)

>Men's Water Polo: Three per quarter; one at the halftime (From TF NCAA A)

Given that university water polo quarters are seven minutes, this doesn't seem too draconian. I wonder how many people are live blogging Div II water polo. You're lucky to get 50 at Cal-0Stanford with the Pac 10 on the line. You would think they'd be glad of a little publicity.

The Land of the Free! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21770094)

Yeehaw! Go go go Amerikkkkkka!

NCAA is right (1)

clawhound (811481) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770222)

This looks one sided, but that view is incorrect. The NCAA sells radio and TV stations exclusive right for them to broadcast a real-time game. The consequence of that is that all other privileged media outlets do not get those same rights.

Yes, I know that there are ways to game this system and make it look foolish. As long as they have something to hold back, such as access to their team members, they will have a press corps willing to play by their rules.

Re:NCAA is right (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770394)

I wonder if the press members realize they hold the power in this 'bargain'?

Seriously, how many games would the press need to skip before this rule was stricken? one? two?

Seriously, if everyone didn't report 1 basketball game, the NCAA would freak out.

Network television (1)

captaindomon (870655) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770374)

This is all about Network television. Do you have any clue how much money they are paying to "officially" cover these sports with their own reporters and analysts? I know it was around 30 million for exclusive coverage of the Olympics a few years ago. If the NCAA lets the little guys do it for free, they are going to lose millions in network contracts.

Is this guy stupid or blind? (1)

jgoemat (565882) | more than 6 years ago | (#21770482)

It's hurting your most passionate fans for no good reason whatsoever.

What makes the world go round? The NCAA makes money from television and marketing rights. If people stop tuning in to watch games live because they can get up-to-the-minute reports online, then the NCAA loses money.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>