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Plexiglass-like DVD to Hold 1TB of Data

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the bigger-and-bigger-storage dept.

Media 166

jcatcw writes "Lucas Mearian at ComputerWorld has a story about a company that plans to demonstrate a new DVD-format at the January CES conference. The .6mm thick disc stores 500GB of data by writing 5GB of data on each of 100 layers within a polymer material similar to Plexiglass. The Israel-based company, Mempile Inc., said its TeraDisc DVDs will offer 1TB of storage for consumers in the next few years, but it's also targeting corporate data archive needs with the new technology that write bits at the molecular level on the florescent-colored polymer. The company plans to sell its first product, a 700GB disc for $30."

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wow (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784252)

so much porn...

and I'm spent.

Dammit (2, Insightful)

thewils (463314) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784264)

...and I just bought myself a Blu-ray :(

Bloody typical.

Re:Dammit (3, Insightful)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784698)

You do understand that that is how progress happens? When the number of people who have just bought a technology exceeds the critical threshold, new products are announced. Who'se ever heard of a new product announcement for something that hasn't just been bought? How often do you hear of a breakthrough that never led to a product, all because there were too few who has just bought the last generation? You are to be honored, for you are of Those Special Buyers who exceeded the threshold for optical mass storage.

Re:Dammit (1)

thewils (463314) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785358)

Say, you don't happen to work for Sony, do you?

Re:Dammit (4, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785996)

Say, you don't happen to work for Sony, do you?

Naw, you can tell because he said you were to be honored, and that you're special. If he worked for Sony, he would have called you an ingrate for complaining in the first place, and lazy for not getting a second job to buy the newest mega-storage format.

Re:Dammit (1)

odourpreventer (898853) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785514)

Don't worry, it's just an announcement. It won't hit the stores in a while.

But I guess that is obvious.

Re:Dammit (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785636)

hey don't worry too much, this is NOT an upgrade. This is a huge step back technologically. It's like how many layers can I stick in a 2D medium before it just doesn't work. But InPhase right now has a full 3D plastic medium that has like hundreds of layers...cuz it's truly 3D. Two lasers intersect in some open space on a disk and burn the plastic to make a bit somewhere in the 3D area. Right now you can go on their website and buy one of the drives so making new multi-layer 2D mediums is kinda stupid. And before you ask, they're gonna have 1+ terabyte disks/drives available within a year or two.

Every one of these formats are worth jack (2, Insightful)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784282)

until they have a cheap (burner AND media) version for the desktop.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

Smordnys s'regrepsA (1160895) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784386)

I'm with you on the burner, but last I checked I spent ~$30 for 15 duel-layer DVDs (8 gigs each, 120gigs total) - so, around 10x the cost/size ratio of this new hologram-DVD. Eventually, the burner will pay for itself.

I didn't RTFA, does it say how long it takes to read/write this monster?

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (5, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784600)

I'm with you on the burner, but last I checked I spent ~$30 for 15 duel-layer DVDs (8 gigs each, 120gigs total) - so, around 10x the cost/size ratio of this new hologram-DVD. Eventually, the burner will pay for itself.


Assuming DVDs are $30 for 120 GB with a $100 reader/writer, and the new disks are $30 per 700 GB with a $3,000 reader/writer, you crossover with a mass-archive need of ~14 TB.

Which isn't all that astronomical (though enough that its probably not worth it for most personal users yet), and I would presume that as a new technology, both the media and reader/writer costs are going to come down more quickly than with the more established DVDs.

What's the shelf life? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785498)

Without some sort of garantee of integrity every one of these formats are worth jack.

I'm sticking to USB hard drives at the moment - too many DVDs have been unreadable after just six months. Integrity is far more important to me than saving a few cents per gigabyte.

At one point I used to write each file twice on the DVD so I'd have a fighting chance of not losing data (I simply made a folder called "backup" on the DVD and put another copy in there). If there was any space left over I sometimes did three copies just to be on the safe side. The problem is that DVDs don't hold enough any more. My files are getting too big.

With a terabyte on a single disk this strategy might be useful again. It would be good if software could automate it though - striping the data for me automagically.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

ShooterNeo (555040) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785604)

Actually, you cross over a LOT sooner in convenience. What would you rather burn, one 700GB disk or 148 DVDs. Granted, I'm sure it will take the burner hours to fill up a disk....but there's NO DISK SWAPPING. I'd say having to swap 100 disks would be the limit at which all but a poor man would switch..

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785712)

Actually, you cross over a LOT sooner in convenience.


That's a good point, but its squishy and subjective; the pure price crossover is harder (now, of course, in a business setting when you have a concrete costs with labor-hours, the "convenience" crossover is a hard cost issue, too.)

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

cbreaker (561297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784432)

$30 for 700GB isn't cheap enough I guess.

Not that it'll EVER be released for that low, but sheesh, 700GB for $30 would be a miracle.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

CommunistHamster (949406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784612)

$30 for 700gb may be fairly good cost-per-gigabyte, but it's only write once. An external hard drive would probably be a batter backup method.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784680)

For personal use, maybe, but if a corporation keeps archives of backups stretching back years this could a good buy.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (2)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784682)

They say the burners will be 3-4 grand. Don't leave that out.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785364)

well IF i was currently burning our company archives every week to dual layer dvd's.. this thing at 300$ per 700gb +3k burnner would pay for it's self in savings over DLDVD media in 54 weeks.. 1 year to realize cost savings on a small 3k$ investment is nothing for a company..

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 6 years ago | (#21786038)

Not saying it isn't worthwhile, just bringing in the other number.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

Feanturi (99866) | more than 6 years ago | (#21786174)

For 4 grand I could buy a whackload of 750 GB hard drives, either USB or in hot-swap chassis enclosures, and rotate through them once a week doing full backups. I'd feel much better about the integrity of such backups, though they would take up a bit more physical space.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785752)

$30 for 700gb may be fairly good cost-per-gigabyte, but it's only write once. An external hard drive would probably be a batter backup method.


For archiving, including archival backups, a write-once solution isn't less good than a rewritable one, it may even be better, all other things being equal, than a rewritable one.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

CharlieHedlin (102121) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784594)

So the LTO tape libraries I purchased at my last employer are worthless?

These will have a huge value in corporate backups (if they are as reliable as tape) and for media production (uncompressed HD)

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

HateBreeder (656491) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784940)

I tend to disagree.

I think that the trend is to move to online content with attitudes more on the lines of:
I'll just download that from the internet whenever i need it rather then burn a DVD of it.

I wouldn't be surprised if in a decade or two, all of your "large" personal media files (photos and videos) would be stored in a HD format somewhere online for easy access.
Desktop CDs/DVDs/Whatever burners will be a thing of the past.
All other "small" personal data (code, documents, etc..) would be stored on flash cards or perhaps encrypted online file servers.

If I had a fast enough internet uplink (latencies lower than 10ms and speeds greater than 100MB/s), I might consider paying a monthly fee for a few terrabytes of high-quality online storage... within a decade, that could be reality.

Re:Every one of these formats are worth jack (1)

Feanturi (99866) | more than 6 years ago | (#21786098)

Desktop CDs/DVDs/Whatever burners will be a thing of the past.

I sure hope not. Sure it would be convenient to be able to get at my media collection from various computers, but I'd be worried about the times my internet isn't working and I want to watch something but I can't because none of my media is physically present. I would also be concerned about losing everything I've collected if the hosting company folded. Or if something I enjoyed got onto a banned list somehow and was permanently removed from the database, or whatever. Not to mention that someone would probably want to make it all Pay-Per-View as well. I want to retain control of the media I enjoy; you'll get my DVD burner away from me when you pry it out of my cold dead hands.

Its not going to be cheap... (1)

WarlockD (623872) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785560)

Currently, LTO4 supports 1.6TB/800GB. The plain drives go for close to 5k and the media runs at about 80-90 bucks a pop. I figure it will cost about that initially and need a high end SAS or Fiber connection. Did I mention that an LTO4 can write at close to 100-150MB/s (not counting compression). Fastest a DVD can write at is about 20-30MB/s. Thats one LOONG backup.

Hell, look on eBay for a PV132T with an LTO2. You can get that library for under $1,500 and it holds close to 4.8TB uncompressed. Even if you want the warranty for it, its still going to be cheaper than when this thing comes out. Did i mention the media is only 10 cents a gig?

Finally (1)

Smordnys s'regrepsA (1160895) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784288)

They actually said how much it would cost. We can all die of shock now.

That being said, how much does the reader/writer cost?

Re:Finally (1)

HateBreeder (656491) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784378)

from TFA: "Mempile's DVD drives will initially retail for between $3,000 and $4,000, and a 700GB platter -- the first model expected out around 2011 -- will sell for $30"

I only have one wish... (5, Funny)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784290)

No format war. Please!

Re:I only have one wish... (4, Funny)

antek9 (305362) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784502)

There'll be no format war. The first retail product exclusively using this disc format will be Duke Nukem Forever, which will settle any wars, and at the same time, time will have run out for good.

Re:I only have one wish... (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785162)

It looks like it's just another archival format, and not a distribution format. Competing formats for backups isn't a bad thing. Competing formats for video distribution is a different issue.

Re:I only have one wish... (2, Insightful)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785530)

Oh, FFS. You just wait till one side wins, let the early adopter retards pay all the development, marketing costs and take the risk.

 

Re:I only have one wish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21785772)

But I need somewhere to store my terabytes of pr0n NOW.

Someone think of the pr0n

Re:I only have one wish... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21785950)

Tip for managing your porn collection: Each month delete half of it at random. You really won't notice the difference.

It's an Israeli company (1)

jabber (13196) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785818)

It isn't a war, it's self-defense.

Ok, go ahead and mod me to hell for being a troll. Just do it already.

Re:I only have one wish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21786086)

ßetamax 4eva !

$30 ? (5, Funny)

fishybell (516991) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784296)

The company plans to sell its first product, a 700GB disc for $30

Unfortunately their second product, the disc burning drive, won't be available for several years.

Re:$30 ? (2, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784738)

No, the second product is the disk reading drive. The third product will be the disk writing drive, and the fourth will be the drivers needed to use the second and third products.

Re:$30 ? (1)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785278)

I'm reminded of the Bren 10, a handgun introduced in the 80's. Sonny Crockett carried one on "Miami Vice", so there was great interest in it. One problem: the manufacturer started selling the handgun without the magazines - they couldn't get them to function correctly. So when you bought it, you got the pistol, a nice plastic case, and a note that said, in essence, "We'll send you magazines when we get around to it." So then the mags finally hit the market - I think a year later. By that point, things were so effed up that the company folded, leaving more handguns then magazines on the market.

"Miami Vice" sucked after the first couple of seasons anyway.

Re:$30 ? (1)

ChameleonDave (1041178) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785616)

Sonny Crockett carried one on "Miami Vice", so there was great interest in it. [...] leaving more handguns then magazines on the market.
Good! Do we really want guns in the hands of retards who buy them because they see cool guys on TV shooting them?

Re:$30 ? (1)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785858)

No more than I want retards to form opinions because of what they read on Slashdot - and yet, here we are.

Re:$30 ? (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785990)

No more than I want retards to form opinions because of what they read on Slashdot - and yet, here we are.

Well I'm convinced.

Data Integrity Over Time? (5, Interesting)

gbulmash (688770) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784304)

They're not planning to hit 1TB until 2011. With all the companies in the storage race, I don't see this horizon representing any special accomplishment. It's a neat way of doing things, but so are some of the other contenders in the race.

What I wonder about is the archival quality of their material. How long before it oxidizes or otherwise brittles itself into uselessness? I remember when everyone was saying that CDs would last forever, unlike cassette tapes, and then we found out that CDs were not eternal. Their plastic might take forever to biodegrade, but their data integrity would degrade within 10-15 years. So, even if this turns out to be the winner in the race to a Terabyte disc, how long will it maintain data integrity for archival purposes?

- Greg

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (3, Interesting)

cbreaker (561297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784454)

That 10-15 years is only on burned media. But I'll tell you, I have plenty of CD-R's that I made in 1996 and they all work great, so maybe there's a huge variation between who made the discs?

Either way, tapes aren't that fantastic either. Currently, the best way to archive data for the long term is to keep it on live, spinning disks in RAID sets. As the disks fail, you replace them, and you have your data perpetually available; and it's online, too.

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784592)

That 10-15 years is only on burned media.
Great. How is one supposed to use this as a backup without burning it?

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (5, Funny)

bcattwoo (737354) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784700)

That 10-15 years is only on burned media.
Great. How is one supposed to use this as a backup without burning it?
Just write your data out on them with a Sharpie. Or even better, scratch it into the plastic with something sharp.

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (1)

CommunistHamster (949406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784706)

The desktop disk stamper? :P

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (1)

Tsiangkun (746511) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784858)

How resistant are RAID arrays to the collapse of the building holding them ?
What about massive vibration from a large earthquake ?

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784870)

How long will it take people to realize that "archive" doesn't mean "write once, place in box, and assume everything will be intact and easy-to-read X years"?

If you want to keep data for more than a few years, and you want to be able to read it without a huge hassle, you'll probably need to copy it from time to time. This may involve media type changes. If your data types are non-trivial, it may even involve file format changes. But one of the great advantages of digital data storage is the ability to make cheap, perfect copies. I'm not saying there's no work involved in keeping up an archive, but it's not like you need to hire an army of scribes either. If it's important enough to keep, it's important enough to keep on fresh, easy-to-read media.

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (1)

dHagger (1192545) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784926)

It looks like the same technology that were demonstrated at Comdex Fall '00 [sysopt.com] more than seven years ago - so the integrity after some 7-8 years should already be known. I also have a faint memory of reading something about a fluorescent multi-layer disc somewhere around fall 1997, so it's possible that some discs have already hit ten years!

That also raises the question; if the technology was announced 7-10 years ago - how likely is it that we will see something released this time?

Re:Data Integrity Over Time? (1)

kcornia (152859) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785814)

I was coming to post exactly this. It seems like once or twice a year we see a story here about some new tech that is right around the corner and will store petabytes of data on the head of a pin. NONE of it has come to pass other than HD and Blu-ray and just now SSD. All these polymer based, molecule level stories are VAPOR.

Think of the portability.. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784306)

I can then fit my entire pr0n collection on just 4 discs!

Re:Think of the portability.. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784332)

Only 4? Heh, n00b...

Re:Think of the portability.. (0, Offtopic)

zsouthboy (1136757) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784412)

(insert joke here regarding your mom, number of discs to store pornographic content of said mother, and the insensitivity of your clod-ness)

Re:Think of the portability.. (1)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784570)

What... like, "Yo momma's so fat, it takes 1TB just to store a shot of the box-cover of her latest movie!" ?

Re:Think of the portability.. (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784704)

What happened to the "insensitive clod" part?

Re:Think of the portability.. (4, Funny)

Smordnys s'regrepsA (1160895) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784468)

That's nothing, I can finally download my own internet!

Re:Think of the portability.. (1)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784494)

Must be that low-res crap. :)

This will turn useless (1)

SilverBlade2k (1005695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784322)

500 gigs is a good idea....until the MPAA gets their greedy mits on it and DRM it into a paperweight.

Re:This will turn useless (1)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784406)

Yep, because the entire point of DRM is to make thing not work. Nobody but the marketing department calls that a "feature".

I wish that was a joke, satire, or even slightly funny, but it is instead quite true. Gah.

FP4J (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784344)

First Post for Jesus!

Jesus loves you very much, Slashdotters.

Believers will spend eternity in Heaven. But nonbelievers will spend an eternity in a lake of fire. Choose carefully.

Re:FP4J (0, Offtopic)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784626)

You're doing it wrong.

Re:FP4J (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784636)

Believers will spend eternity in Heaven. But nonbelievers will spend an eternity in a lake of fire. Choose carefully.

I choose you, Pikachu!

Re:FP4J (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784656)

"They say rock 'n' roll is the devil's music. Well, let's say that it is; I've got news for you. Let's say that rock'n'roll is the devil's music and we know it for a fact to be the absolutely, unequivocally true. At least he fucking jams! Ha ha ha ha! Okay? Did you hear that correctly? If it's a choice between eternal hell and good tunes and eternal heaven and new kids on the fuckin' block ... I'm gonna be surfing on the lake of fire, rocking out, high five at Satan every time I pass the motherfucking shore." -Bill Hicks

Re:FP4J (1)

Bryansix (761547) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784832)

Here are the stakes -- the most staggering ones conceivable: On one hand, eternal happiness. On the other, infinite damnation. The question: "God is, or He is not. But to which side shall we incline?"

That's Pascal's dilemma.

relevant info about price (3, Informative)

computerchimp (994187) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784394)

FTFA:

"Mempile's DVD drives will initially retail for between $3,000 and $4,000, and a 700GB platter -- the first model expected out around 2011 -- will sell for $30"

I can see! (1)

mseidl (828824) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784400)

I can see straight through this! Total vaporware!

Re:I can see! (1)

nog_lorp (896553) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785478)

Sorry man, jokes based on TFA don't get modded funny. Only off-topic jokes or jokes based on false assumptions about TFA get that.

I hope (1)

Kamineko (851857) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784408)

I really hope that if TD-DVDs catch on, we don't have the stupid situation now where folks refer to the discs themselves and the common codec used for commercial movies with the same terms.


(Can you tell that I'd prefer 'Some Mega High Quality MP4-or-something Files on a DVD/HDDVD/BluRay' rather than this 'You can fit so many minutes of movie on a disc! Yes, it's true!' baloney?)

More Vaporware (2, Interesting)

asphaltjesus (978804) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784426)

The problem the company has is not technical. They could have the technical and mass production issues worked out and yet not a single disk will be made.

It didn't come from the companies mentioned in the wikipedia article, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD [wikipedia.org] so they cannot possibly get OEM/IT/Entertainment industry adoption. Furthermore, "Not invented here" is the typical media conglomerate response to all of these innovations.

There's no real-world scenario where this thing sees the light of day. Something like it and most likely quite inferior and more expensive from the DVD cartel? Sure.

Who cares about media adoption? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784792)

I don't care if they never have video hit the device, I want it just for data storage and transfer.

Though honestly Blu-Ray might be close to it by the time it comes out with data discs that have more layers... I'm still thinking a Blu-Ray burner (when they get a little cheaper) is the best bet for large data storage over the next few years.

Re:Who cares about media adoption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21785322)

I have no intention of converting from my DVD collection any time in the foreseeable future.

I suspect I'm not alone, so there is a market resistance to the adoption of any new format.

In the market for computer archival storage, however...

HVD (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784436)

but what about the HVD? [wikipedia.org]

War (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784450)

Knowing the israelis, the next format war will be slightly more animated.

At least the palestinians might breathe easy for a bit

hmm (2, Informative)

wwmedia (950346) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784490)

1. make a press release 2. get slashvertised 3. wait few years to actually develop the technology at affordable prices 4. profit??

Cool, just what we need (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784556)

Yet another format to have to buy all our stuff in, again.

I guess thats one way to keep the MPAA in business, every 10 years or so have to repurchase our movie collection.

Re:Cool, just what we need (1)

plague3106 (71849) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784708)

You're not thinking about this the right way. Imagine ordering 30 movies on a single disc.

Re:Cool, just what we need (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785082)

I already own all the movies i want, so for me it would be buying them *again*.

( beta..then video disk then VHS .now regular DVD... )

DVD/CD (1)

sveard (1076275) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784558)

Why is this a cheap, plexiglass-like DVD and not a plexiglass-like CD?

Re:DVD/CD (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784718)

Because you only get DRM on plexiglass-like DVDs.

Re:DVD/CD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784740)

Why is this a cheap, plexiglass-like DVD and not a plexiglass-like CD?
Because a DVD holds more data. Duh. :) :) :)

Forwards-compatible? (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784564)

Mempile's DVD drives will initially retail for between $3,000 and $4,000, and a 700GB platter -- the first model expected out around 2011 -- will sell for $30
Will the early drives be able to read/write higher capacity discs?

riiight. (5, Interesting)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784614)

Its not a format war, its a new format. But it *will* be a format war if any of the large firms thinks there is any money in it.

Remember "DataPlay"? A small format optical disk (with an elaborate and complicated DRM system btw) in the early 2000s - they had a new and innovative format. They even got the record companies on their side until the big players (in this case Philips) looked at them, saw they had a business model and crushed them to develop small-form factor optical (SFFO). Of course, SFFO vanished as soon as cheap flash memory was available (low power, no moving part) but the point remains. A single isolated firm will be destroyed by a large multinational as soon as they prove they have a business case. And I bet my metaphorical hat that any array of patents will not affect that outcome in any way.

More information on Dataplay/SFFO available on net, here one's link:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn2930-tiny-optical-disc-could-store-five-movies.html [newscientist.com]

Besides, I've seen a number of multi terrabyte, multi layered optical systems paraded over the last few years - I label this vapor ware until I see it on the shelves. And even then I would not trust my data to it until its been proven in the corporate world.

Smaller media (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784674)

I'd really prefer something as small as the flash memory you see in most phones or cameras. It'd be awesome to be able to plug them in to my video playing device, and instead of having to search through 50,000 DVD cases, I can simply select the video I want to play.

Is it just me or (2, Insightful)

carp3_noct3m (1185697) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784710)

does this seem like making a vhs that can hold 40 hours of video? Cd/DVDs are on the beginning slope of the trash shute, SSD and other technologies are the things up and coming. But on the other hand dvd, Hddvd and bluray are here to, so who knows, but if it were me Id be working on an organic memory cube that measures the size of my fingernail and that I can download the contents of my brain onto... I for one welcome our brain downloading overlords?

Re:Is it just me or (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21784806)

if it were me Id be working on an organic memory cube that measures the size of my fingernail
You're in luck, "method and apparatus for measuring the size of a fingernail" hasn't been patented yet. Can't help thinking it's a rather specialized market but I guess that's the way to build a business, start with a small niche market you can dominate and move on from there. Maybe it could be adapted to measure toenails too. The possibilities are endless.

Oh for goodness sakes... (2, Insightful)

AbRASiON (589899) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784746)

When I saw this on Maxconsole about 12 hours ago, I though to myself - I hope slashdot don't report on that stuff, those guys have a bit more sense, the more technical types know vaopourware when we see it.

but no........

Most of us enthusiasts and techs on this site have been reading about 'magical future disc formats'!!! since about when the CD came out for PC's well over 10 years ago, it's all bloody rubbish until their is one on shelves, period.

CAREFUL: Looking for investors. FRAUD? (1)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784804)

The company wants investors [mempile.com] . In my opinion, the investors page is written in a curious way, giving the impression that some of the companies listed may not actually be investors, but associated as suppliers, or not associated at all.

Slashdot has a long history of running articles about risky or even fraudulent companies that want investments, in my opinion. I think Slashdot editors should be required to run conflict-of-interest disclaimers, to give legal assurance they were not paid to run an article.

The easiest way to make money is to steal it from investors who don't really have the capacity to understand technology. That's what happened in the year 2000 market crash [about.com] . That "crash" was largely theft, and pre-planned theft, in my opinion. Others share my opinion: Blood on the Street: The Sensational Inside Story of How Wall Street Analysts Duped a Generation of Investors [amazon.com] , an excellent book.

Here is an questionable statement from the article referenced by Slashdot:

"Unlike HD DVDs, which use blue lasers to record and read data off a reflective surface on top of a polymer substrate, Mempile's TeraDisc drives use more powerful red-laser technology to write and read."

Since red light is of a longer wavelength, it has a lower resolution. The power is not relevant. All systems use the power that is necessary to make them work.

Here is another quote that seems ignorant and crazy, or deliberately dishonest, to me:

"Over the next 10 years, both studio and consumer HD products will multiply by 10 times the current resolution."

That statement tries to invent a situation in which the "new technology" would actually be needed for other than making backups. However, even the present NTSC resolution is enough for most TV watching. It seems doubtful that displays with more resolution than HD DVD will become common.

Also, HD displays are far more expensive. Would people actually want to pay more again, for resolution that is so great they cannot see it unless they are very close to the display? I think not.

Re:CAREFUL: Looking for investors. FRAUD? (1)

Klaus_1250 (987230) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785536)

Here is another quote that seems ignorant and crazy, or deliberately dishonest, to me: "Over the next 10 years, both studio and consumer HD products will multiply by 10 times the current resolution."

Depends on how you look at it. UltraHD has 16 times the resolution as HDTV and seeing how consumers have been jumping on the Flatscreen/Widescreen/HDTV/HDReady bandwagon, is quite likely that in 10 years it will be the next big thing. If you happen to have $12.500, you can already get a UltraHD monitor.

However, even the present NTSC resolution is enough for most TV watching. It seems doubtful that displays with more resolution than HD DVD will become common.

Depends on the show, but HDTV does give a better viewing experience overall (though it probably also stems from the fact that most digital HDTV broadcasts uses H264 instead of MPEG2). Though UltraHD might not improve on the viewing experience much compared to HDTV, if you have a serious Home Theater setup which a huge screen (70inch+) I'm pretty sure you'll notice the difference.

Re:CAREFUL: Looking for investors. FRAUD? (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785916)

However, even the present NTSC resolution is enough for most TV watching.


In a "640K should be enough for anyone sense", perhaps.

It seems doubtful that displays with more resolution than HD DVD will become common.


Why?

Also, HD displays are far more expensive.


Eh. Moderate sized 1080p displays can be had for ~$1000 and falling. 720p displays and 1080i seem to be beginning to get squeezed out. because of the lack of room for intermediate resolutions in the prices in the market.

Would people actually want to pay more again, for resolution that is so great they cannot see it unless they are very close to the display?


You don't have to be any closer to see the detail on a higher resolution display if it simply takes up more of your visual field. "What we have no is all anyone will ever want" is almost always wrong.

Fluorescent-colored? (4, Insightful)

noidentity (188756) | more than 6 years ago | (#21784830)

fluorescent-colored polymer


Hmmm, what color is that exactly?

vaporware (1)

wgoodman (1109297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785080)

Haven't we been hearing stories about how some company or another is coming out with a n layered disc that'll hold so much more than anything that's currently available for oh, 8-9 years now? I remember the original ones were when burnable DVDs were barely out and there was a company promising a 25gig disc in the next year or so using a many layered fluorescent disc. I expect that Duke Nukem Forever will be the first title released on this type of disc and I'll play it on the PC in my flying car.

Death of Blu-Ray / HD-DVD? (1)

Dutch Gun (899105) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785138)

I wonder if a product like this (I'm not saying this will actually be the product, mind you) will end up being the death of Blu-Ray and/or HD-DVD? It's always seemed to me like the new HD formats aren't a compelling enough leap in technology to warrant a "standardized" format shift (and the fact that we have two competing standards), since many people already have pretty significant DVD libraries (I know I do). Maybe consumers will simply wait for the next technology to emerge, or at the very least, for one format to become a de-facto standard. I'm certainly not purchasing any HD videos at this point.
   

30 dollar disk (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785302)

For a 10000 dollar device.

Unfortunately... (1)

Memroid (898199) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785456)

Unfortunately, your standard 50 pack of these 700GB discs would set you back $1500...

Then again, that would hold the equivalent of roughly 50,000 cds, which would be 1,000 50-packs, which would cost around $25,000.

More Layers == Slower (3, Interesting)

KonoWatakushi (910213) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785504)

Unless they have found a way to record 100 layers at once, it will take nearly forever to record a disc with this new format. For the same reason, the proposed 3+ layer HD DVD and Blu-ray discs are also not very interesting. More than likely, these efforts are merely for marketing purposes: to show that HD DVD can match Blu-ray, and that Blu-ray has a bright future. Unfortunately, these are both specious arguments, and it is best to judge them on their initial implementations.

One of the few alternative approaches that looks very promising uses co-linear holography on an optical disc. The advantage is that it can record multiple bits in the same area (volume actually) at the same time, so it scales much better with both density and speed. It may be a ways off yet, but one thing is for certain: an optical disc can only spin so fast, and recording bits one at a time simply doesn't scale well.

Blu-ray is the best we can hope for it the near future. From a data storage perspective, it is far superior to HD DVD, and will remain so until they are both obsolete.

Feynman, anyone? (1)

excelsior_gr (969383) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785510)

"new technology that write bits at the molecular level on the florescent-colored polymer"

It can grow even more, if it goes down to the atomic level...!!

Molecular Level? (1)

Dripdry (1062282) | more than 6 years ago | (#21785932)

And what happens if there's a scratch on the disc? That wouldn't hurt a reader's ability to read?
I'm interested in knowing how they plan to do error correction here, but maybe I'm just out of the computer biz for too long. Any suggestions?
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