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China Anti-Corruption Web Site Crashes On First Day

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the it-couldn't-happen-here dept.

Government 169

An anonymous reader tips us to news out of China that the Web site of the National Bureau of Corruption Prevention crashed on Tuesday, just hours after its launch, as droves of people logged on to complain about corruption among officials. "The number of visitors was very large and beyond our expectations," an anonymous NBCP official said.

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Boom today (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804296)

And boom tomorrow... always boom tomorrow.

Hmmm.... (1)

cheater512 (783349) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804298)

Looks like they have their work cut out for them.

doh (5, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804302)

China Anti-Corruption Web Site Crashes On First Day

It didn't crash. it just got corrupted.

Re:doh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804450)

China Anti-Corruption Web Site Crashes On First Day

It didn't crash. it just got corrupted.
Windows into serving the government?

Windows site? (3, Funny)

MPAB (1074440) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804572)

Perhaps it failed the WGA check

Re:doh (0, Troll)

Chrisje (471362) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804648)

Laugh about it... :-D What worries me more is that they actually have a minister of Supervision.

What does he Supervise? That people celebrate the "Two minutes' Hate"?

Re:doh (2, Funny)

Mathinker (909784) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805018)

> What does he Supervise? That people ....

No, duh, he makes sure Superman doesn't go around peeping, of course!

His next project is to extract lead from toy manufacturer's paints to make lead-shielded underwear....

Re:doh (1)

s1d (1185389) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804850)

The saga of bad QoS on Chinese products continues. Perhaps they bribed the testing team?

Re:doh (0)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807202)

Could this be a new version of Mao's Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom fiasco?

We didn't know that many people cared. (5, Funny)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804308)

"We didn't expect too many people to know about the corruption, or the website. Damn."

Re:We didn't know that many people cared. (1)

ari wins (1016630) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804742)

They quickly realized the website they built could lead to residents of China thinking, hence it was moved outside of their firewall.

URL? (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804354)

TFA doesn't have a URL. Can someone post to help load test their server.

Re:URL? (5, Informative)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804380)

Found it.

http://yfj.mos.gov.cn/ [mos.gov.cn]

Re:URL? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804750)

They seem to have some gigantic jpegs on their website. Maybe that's why it could not handle the load.

Re:URL? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805120)

They seem to have some gigantic jpegs on their website. Maybe that's why it could not handle the load.
http://yfj.mos.gov.cn/yfj/1.jpg [mos.gov.cn] <- They used this for a thumbnail and just scaled it down with HTML. It's a freaking 3504x2336 JPEG.

-rw-r--r-- 1 nobody nogroup 3173056 2007-12-24 05:59 chinafails.jpg
Ho ri shi toh bat man.

Re:URL? (3, Funny)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805166)

I think its still crashed, it's got all these wierd squiggles instead of proper writing...

Re:URL? (4, Insightful)

Xzzy (111297) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805540)

I wonder if the 3 meg jpeg on the front page had anything to do with the crash.

Nice to know that, no matter what part of the world you're in, people are willing to listen to "my brother's little kid, he's great with this world wide web stuff!" and actually pay them to do some work.

Re:URL? (1)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805832)

That was my hunch. But, no sense in putting a artifact corrupted JPG image on there, eh?

Re:URL? (1)

Krupuk (978265) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806144)

Corruption goes with cronyism.

Re:URL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805382)

I'm guessing the 3MB jpg image on the front page might have something to do with this...

Re:URL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804386)

TFA has an URL http://yfj.mos.gov.cn/yfj/index.html [mos.gov.cn]

Re:URL? (1)

Machinus (1068104) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804508)

Whatever happened to reading?

Everyone head on over to yfj.mos.gov.cn. It's up.

Right in the article, too.

China and Technology (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804392)

the website is showing chinks in its armor

Re:China and Technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804406)

While not very politically correct, that is by far the funniest thing I've read all day.

Gratz.

Re:China and Technology (1, Insightful)

HotFat (46399) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804442)

Get serious, it's just plain racist and should be modded accordingly.

Re:China and Technology (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804580)

Racism is in the intention, not the word.

Re:China and Technology (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805000)

That is one of the most intelligent comments I've read on Slashdot. Most people confuse the two.

Re:China and Technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21806400)

The joke itself in this context does not lack the intent that you are implying. The use of the word chinks is a double entendre in this context. It certainly is intended as a racist comment. If the original poster did not imply harm or so no harm then the original poster is ignorant of the implications of the word. Many racists are ignorant of the fact that they are being racists.

Re:China and Technology (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21807748)

What do you get when you set up an infinite alternating series of 5 Chinese people, one Mexican person, and 5 African-American people?

The perfect sprinkler system!

Chink-chink-chink-chink-chink Spic! Nigga-nigga-nigga-nigga-nigga. Chink-chink-chink-chink-chink Spic! Nigga-nigga-nigga-nigga-nigga.

Oh no! (5, Funny)

DeltaQH (717204) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804396)

"The number of visitors was very large and beyond our expectations,"

Oh no. And now the slashdotters are comming!!!!

Re:Oh no! (1)

Martian_Kyo (1161137) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804510)

my thoughts exactly.
the first time it crashed the statistics were
99% users from china
1% Others
the second time it crashes it will be:
28% USA
24% UK
22% Germany
19% Sweden
5% France
2% other
------
Referer:
98% www.slashdot.org
2% other

Oh no!-Tensile Strength. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804548)

"Oh no. And now the slashdotters are comming!!!!"

Yup! All 500 Tons of them.

Re:Oh no! (4, Insightful)

pipatron (966506) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804610)

Sadly, I think the number of chinese internet users that has been subject to corrupt government far outweighs the mere millions of slashdotters.

The USA should get one of these... (4, Funny)

netsharc (195805) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804424)

... and capital punishment for officials caught corrupting.

(I hope the above isn't construed as a death threat against Bush! And his staff. And Congress. And the Senate. DHS... TSA...)

The USA should get one of these...Alive Citizens. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804474)

Well let's see. The geek solution is a technical one (website.) While the common sense solution involves people physically doing something, like their civic duty (do I really need to explain what those are?).

Re:The USA should get one of these...Alive Citizen (2, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804506)

The common sense solution involves getting arrested or tased? I somehow doubt that. It may in fact involve blogging on the net about it until your voice is heard. Standing out in the cold and waving signs is the -old- way to protest. You can get a LOT more attention with a good blog, or bunch of bloggers blogging the same blog. Blog blog blog.

Do I have a blog? No, I don't have any extra time in my day to talk to myself. I've better things to do.

Re:The USA should get one of these...Alive Citizen (2, Insightful)

jmac1492 (1036880) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804990)

Well let's see. The geek solution is a technical one (website.) While the common sense solution involves people physically doing something, like their civic duty (do I really need to explain what those are?).

Wow. I'm reading this comment at -1. W00T for the Slashdot groupthink. Apparently, AC, you should have mentioned what the civic duties are. If you live in a democracy, as this poster (though not TFA) is referring to, and you don't like the people in charge, you VOTE FOR THE OTHER GUY in the next election.

Whine about things on the internet is +3 Insightful and this is -1?

Re:The USA should get one of these...Alive Citizen (1)

ichigo 2.0 (900288) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807036)

If you live in a democracy, as this poster (though not TFA) is referring to, and you don't like the people in charge, you VOTE FOR THE OTHER GUY in the next election.
So what do you do when the other guy is just as bad?

Re:The USA should get one of these...Alive Citizen (1)

DavidShor (928926) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806516)

"While the common sense solution involves people physically doing something, like their civic duty (do I really need to explain what those are?)."

Yes, that would be great. This is China, a lot of people died the last time they tried the "common sense solution".

Re:The USA should get one of these... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804484)

(Your reservation for a flight to Quantamo Bay has been confirmed.)

In soviet China ... (1)

MPAB (1074440) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804554)

... corruption web crashes you!

(Somehow makes too much sense)

The UK should get one of these... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21804726)

On second thoughts, the data would just go missing...

Re:The UK should get one of these... (1)

serialdogma (883470) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805236)

But at least it will still be in a government building, the House of Lords one would presume.

Re:The USA should get one of these... (1)

RattFink (93631) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806750)

... and capital punishment for officials caught corrupting.


There ain't enough power in America to power that many electric chairs.

Re:The USA should get one of these... (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807362)

Yeah and with the PATRIOT act, you do not even need to log in. People just can contact you like that to, uhm, verify your claim.

Hey, with Echalon, you do not even need such a website as they already know.

Corruption (0, Offtopic)

Sigvatr (1207234) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804428)

They were probably hosted by netfirms.com

/code? (1)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804524)

If they use the code that runs /., and enough commodity computers, the web site wouldn't crash due to load. Can't say about it's pipes to the 'net, though.

Is it "helping" the regime there to have the corruption reported, as in providing a place for the populace to report the corruption, which allows the central government to get a bigger cut, or is it, in the long run, likely to open that government more, which autocrats tend to perceive as "not helping", but which could improve the lives of the proletariat by freeing what wealth and income they have to be spent on themselves?

Re:/code? (1)

DeltaQH (717204) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804586)

Another 100 flowers campaign?

"Let a hundred flowers bloom, let the hundred schools of thought contend."

Just another way to solve the corruption problem. Lets people complain openly and afterwards identify them to make them..... stop complaining.

Problem solved.. and business can go on as usual.... Ok... Just kidding ;-)

Reactions to be expected (1, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804562)

First of all, they'll try to find out why the heck so many people knew about it. I'm fairly sure it was planned as a publicity stunt, showing that only a handful of people will actually use the page, and this in turn was likely tried by not announcing it too widely.

I guess the result of the examination will be the blogging about government activity should be curtailed.

Re:Reactions to be expected (5, Insightful)

jandersen (462034) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805212)

I'm fairly sure it was planned as a publicity stunt

Or perhaps they actually want to do something about corruption, but hadn't counted on just how many would try access the site. Corruption is widespread in China, and very unpopular. The only people who want is the people - the criminals - who benefit from it. This is the people, nor is it the national government, because it causes unrest, which the national government has to deal with; and I don't think they want that.

The chinese government are like most governments in most modern nations - they by and large want to do what is best for the people, or what they think is best. They are not monsters that enjoy making the population as unhappy as possible, despite the picture that gets painted in the more reactionary media in the west. The big problem they have is that they have an incredibly vast country to control and simply not enough resources; that and the fact that corruption has been part of the Chinese society for well over 5000 years. It will probably take at least a generation of modernisation to change this.

Every time there are news from China, it is interpreted in the worst possible light - if they put a man on the moon, it must be because they starve their poor and want to rain death on America, if they tighten copyright laws, it is 'repression', if they don't, they are 'thieves'. Try to be fair - criticize where there is genuinely something to criticize, praise where that is due. That's what we expect for ourselves, isn't it?

Re:Reactions to be expected (2, Informative)

Sigismundo (192183) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806062)

I totally agree with what you've said. Especially on Slashdot, news stories about China tend to be interpreted negatively, and in a very 1-dimensional way. The things that Slashdotters associate with China are always negative: the Great Firewall, jailing dissenters, censorship. I don't agree with these things either, but this is just a very small part of China, which is an extraordinarily vast country. For a country that has been growing so fast since Deng Xiaoping took office, there are bound to be some growing pains.

Furthermore, it should be obvious that parties within the government are making an earnest attempt at stifling corruption. Witness the death sentence [bbc.co.uk] of the head of the Chinese FDA, who was charged with corruption. China's current president has a reputation for being strongly against corruption, and is well-liked because of it.

It's unfortunate that the anti-corruption website was so poorly designed, but I don't doubt that the intention behind it was genuine.

Re:Reactions to be expected (3, Insightful)

DavidShor (928926) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806722)

"The chinese government are like most governments in most modern nations - they by and large want to do what is best for the people, or what they think is best."

No, they are not. They want to stay in power, and keeping to people from starving is necessary to do that. Everything they do for their people is to keep them from rebellion.

"The big problem they have is that they have an incredibly vast country to control and simply not enough resources;"

If they wanted to help the people, they wouldn't spend huge sums of money on monitoring their population, torturing dissidents, and building the world's most advanced censorship regime. India has a billion people too, but they seem to run their country without wide scale torture.

Their big "problem", is that their people are only being kept from rebellion because of unsustainable economic growth, which the Chinese government is pursuing by inflationary monetary policy and environmental degradation on a scale unseen since the industrial revolution.

At some point, the growth will stop, and China's ethnically fractured population, made insane by generations of propaganda, will assert their power. I don't imagine it will be pretty.

"Try to be fair - criticize where there is genuinely something to criticize, praise where that is due. That's what we expect for ourselves, isn't it?"

Hitler did an amazing job building Germany's Autobahn network, Pinochet lead Chile to a path of economic prosperity, and China has build a great deal of infrastructure. We don't talk about these things, because they are far outweighed by the overall evil of the perpetrators.

Re:Reactions to be expected (1, Insightful)

ichigo 2.0 (900288) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807206)

They want to stay in power, and keeping to people from starving is necessary to do that. Everything they do for their people is to keep them from rebellion.
I hope you do realize that applies to every government of every country on Earth, democratic or otherwise.

Re:Reactions to be expected (1)

DavidShor (928926) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807582)

Yes, fully. Sadly, the equilibrium level of welfare for the population is lower for dictatorships then democracies.

Re:Reactions to be expected (1)

djupedal (584558) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805274)

"First of all, they'll try to find out why the heck so many people knew about it."

One announcement on TV to, oh say, 200 or so million viewers, and then a few seconds of fast paced texting and in less time than you can make instant noodles you've got, oh say 200 or so million clients hitting the site. No mystery why...

They have announcements down pat. However, they are still learning about the risks involved in hiring the first guy that claims he knows how to run a website.

/dev/null (3, Insightful)

c0d3h4x0r (604141) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804616)

This web site was only meant to pacify the citizenry, by making them feel heard. It's no different than here in the USA when you write your Senator or e-mail a company's technical support address: it's not like anyone really cares what you have to say, or will actually read it or do anything about it.

If anything, the corrupt Chinese government officials were just going to use the information to decide which citizens to throw in prison next.

Re:/dev/null (1, Redundant)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804660)

I seem to remember that they executed a corrupt government official this year or in 2006.

Re:/dev/null (1)

Korveck (1145695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806894)

Yes it happens, but only if the corrupted official has no friends in the power circle.

Re:/dev/null (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804690)

Government officials that are corrupt, and embarass the party, often end up with a bullet in the head. A certain amount of corruption can be overlooked, damaging the reputation of the party is far more serious.

Re:/dev/null (1)

HeroreV (869368) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805458)

This web site was only meant to pacify the citizenry, by making them feel heard.
There's no reason to immediately jump to that conclusion. Many Chinese officials actually do care about the citizens of China and want to work hard to make China a better place. Their ideas of what is best may be very different from yours and mine, but that doesn't mean they get off an making people suffer. Why is it so difficult to believe that the Chinese government is serious about this, that it really wants to improve?

Re:/dev/null (1)

maraist (68387) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806486)

Why is it so difficult to believe that the Chinese government is serious about this, that it really wants to improve?

Because then they'd have a free press. Consider the direction of the information. In a free press, the information moves from the people through the controlled media back to the people. The degree of control is inversely proportional to the number of media outlets - a government can not quickly curtail embarrasing information across thousands of independent news channels and news papers, but it can, for example, control the BBC or any other state-run institution. I'm not implying that control IS exerted, just probability of effective control.

Now, consider a taddle-tale web site. Who sees the information? Not the public. It's not a blog (unless I'm mistaken). Information moves from the people to the government - it's a form of free information gathering (as opposed to expensive spying efforts). Command and Control oriented socities always want to have their pulse on the attitudes of it's citizenry. Ever play a civ-city type game? Lack of knowledge of your own people is fatal.

I applaud this web site, because, if for no other reason, the government will have a new avenue of information gathering which will allow them to make more informed decisions, and thus more optimal.. The remaining questions are of their goals and intentions. As other posters have stated, any political party wishes to hide embarrasing information.. Party leaders who embarass the party are - well, to say the lease, removed. There is no further embarrasement that a 'secret' ballot like this can provide, but it would shed light on potentially embarrasing activities of regional governors. The rule is passed down through the command heirarchy of what is acceptible behavior, and when tattled on, members are brought into line more quickly. But I don't imagine that all agregious offenses would trigger punishment. Despotic rule which quells uprisings, for example would trigger taddle-tales, but the heirarchy would smile on such feedback and likely reward the governor.. So the public's interest is not fully at interest here. At least, not to the same degree that other feedback systems might provide.

Re:/dev/null (4, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806046)

China is making insane amounts of money from its new capital markets. The government has 51% ownership in many of these corporations. Investors will pull their money out of China if they perceive corruption to be on the rise. An "Enron" in China could cause many billions in the government's money to evaporate overnight. It is in the government's interest minimize corruption in its publicly-traded companies.

I don't share your cynicism. Feel free to criticize China for being authoritarian and for opposing what the Western world considers to be fundamental human rights, but don't assume that everything about China is bad. Corruption will cause the top of China's "Communist" party to lose power and money; they will fight it out of self-interest, not altruism. Government leaders acting out of any other motivation is a rarity in human history.

Re:/dev/null (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21806558)

My local senator has directly replied to emails that I have sent as part of online petitions against pending state legislation. If yours doesnt you should get out there and vote for someone who will.

A good sign (2, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804620)

In a part of the world where government corruption is hideously rampant, I think this is a wonderful sign. I suggests that China's national government and many citizens want to reduce corruption. This program might not take down highly connected corrupted officials (only a free press can do that, I think), but I bet it could make lots of people's lives better.

Assuming that the complaints are actually investigated, that the investigations are fair, and that most people don't make false accusations of corruption, that is.

Re:A good sign (1)

kaiwai (765866) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804756)

Alot of people think that Chinese actually care about democracy, heck, many people here think people care about democracy - and yet, demonstrated over and over again in the US elections, no one can be bothered exercising that right.

Back to China, what pisses the average Joe off there isn't so much corruption between high profile people, its when they find that their land, house, cow, donkey, car or some other piece of property is stolen by the government in the name of progress - and worse still, none of the laws designed to protect them, are actually followed.

PS. For those who are dense, there is a difference between having a law and actually enforcing it. There are alot of laws and constitutional rights which are not being held up - China's constitution allows freedom of speech, for example.

Re:A good sign (3, Insightful)

owlnation (858981) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804772)

In a part of the world where government corruption is hideously rampant, I think this is a wonderful sign. I suggests that China's national government and many citizens want to reduce corruption. This program might not take down highly connected corrupted officials (only a free press can do that, I think), but I bet it could make lots of people's lives better.
Yes, but why is this restricted to China? I am 100% for-sure-certain that if a similar website was put up for the UK exactly the same thing would happen.

And in the UK, were such a thing to happen the Government would make promises to tackle the issue. They'd appoint some sort of quasi-governmental commission that was essentially accountable to no-one and "investigate". They'd then generate large and frequent reports that hid problems in obscure language deep into the report to ensure no-one ever read them, and occasionally set targets that no-one would ever reach. No-one would be held accountable or punished for those charges not being reached. This, despite vast amounts of tax payers money being used in the whole fiasco. The logo for the new commission alone would cost a few million just to start with.

The "free" press (the government owned) BBC and the more than 50% that's owned by New Corps International wouldn't report much as usual.

No, this is not unique to China -- but on the bright side, in China the people don't have 5 million security cameras following their every move.

Re:A good sign (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805032)

Wrong. All countries are not equally corrupt. I'm from the United States. I live in Latin America. Here, for $100, you can buy just about any gov't document, get out of any ticket, etc. Try doing that in California (or London).

Re:A good sign (1)

Eternauta3k (680157) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807404)

I live in Latin America. Here, for $100, you can buy just about any gov't document, get out of any ticket, etc.
"Latin America" is a big place buddy

Re:A good sign (2, Informative)

Macthorpe (960048) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805244)

You can see how they've held back on reporting on the recent issues regarding the data that the government lost.

They didn't [bbc.co.uk] report much [bbc.co.uk] about that [bbc.co.uk] , did they?

Yes, the government are incompetent, but to claim the BBC "wouldn't report much" is false and can be demonstrated as such.

Re:A good sign (1)

asifyoucare (302582) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805858)

I suggests that China's national government and many citizens want to reduce corruption

They can never be a first world country otherwise.

Who would be brave enough? (4, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804686)

To complain 'on paper' like that?

With that government, i know i wouldn't. Hell, I'm almost afraid to complain about mine these days..

"The Manager's Wife" (3, Interesting)

Circlotron (764156) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804746)

Speaking of China and corruption, I had to laugh out loud when I read the quote at the bottom of the [Slashdot] page: "Mencken and Nathan's Fifteenth Law of The Average American: The worst actress in the company is always the manager's wife." There once was an actress named Jiang Qing... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiang_Qing [wikipedia.org]

Does anyone know... (3, Funny)

Perseid (660451) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804754)

...the Chinese character for 'pwnt'?

Re:Does anyone know... (2, Informative)

earlgrey1 (1003967) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805404)

Hmm the slashdot text box does not support unicode. "bei zhan you" is the romanized pronounciation.

Re:Does anyone know... (1)

maciarc (1094767) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805648)

...the Chinese character for 'pwnt'?
Isn't it the same character as the one that means 'teabag'?

Re:Does anyone know... (1)

ybfelix (1205108) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806546)

"bei zhan you" is silly, that's the conventional meaning for "owned"

IMHO it's "miao" , lit."second". It's short for "miao sha", i.e "slay somebody within seconds".(here's a picture of the characters http://i3.tinypic.com/6kqmirc.gif [tinypic.com] )

---

hell I forget I even got a username on slashdot...surprise for a Chinese non-nerd

As a general rule ... (2, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804822)

one should install pristine officials right from the original CD, and then periodically CRC them to make sure they haven't been corrupted. It's especially important not to download your officials from any old site on the Web, because they might have been deliberately corrupted.

Absolute power... (3, Insightful)

ahodgkinson (662233) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804842)

From the article:
  • The bureau has been entrusted to collect and analyze information from the banking, land use, medicine and telecommunications sectors, among others, and to share it with prosecuting organs, courts and the police.
Share the information with police, who might actually come after the people making the most complaints?

The cynic in me says that this is probably merely an initiative by the government to see where the problems are, rather than a true attempt to end corruption. A few high profile cases will be dealt with, but the rest will be window dressing. I wouldn't be surprised if a few of the loudest complainers are quietly dealt with.

I think the Chinese authorities are realistic enough to know that they face an impossible task. Witness the first 'death penalty for corruption' laws enacted, with great fanfare, well over ten years ago. In spite of much PR and many executions, corruption remains as widespread as ever. The death penalty certainly doesn't seem to be a deterrent against corruption.

One of biggest problems facing China's government is ensuring its own long-term survival, and corruption is a big danger to the government's survival. They should know. The communist revolution itself was a reaction against corruption.

As they say: Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

2007 is ten years ago? (1, Informative)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804914)

Find out what happened to Zheng Xiaoyu, former head of product safety in China.

That was july THIS year, so with one simple googling I basically shot down your entire rant. This story even made it to slashdot, so I not only show you to be incapable of googling, I show you incapable of recollecting events reported on a site you read. Why then shoud I take anything else you write serious?

Get your facts straight, then I might take your opinions serious.

Re:2007 is ten years ago? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805086)

And you have missed the parents point completely. The parent mentioned that a few examples would be made but that there would be no fight against overall corruption. Remember, the plural form of anecdote is not data.

Re:2007 is ten years ago? (2, Insightful)

ahodgkinson (662233) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806330)

  • So 2007 is ten years ago?

No. 2007 is now. And yes, in 2007 another public official was executed for corruption in China. Zheng Xiaoyu was probably not the only, nor will he be the last, government official to be executed in China for corruption. Believe it or not, I am aware that China still executes govenment officials (and also the occasional businessman) for corruption.

Please re-read what I wrote:

  • A few high profile cases will be dealt with, but the rest will be window dressing.
The death penalty for corruption was enacted over a decade ago, and, as you correctly imply, remains in force to this day. I didn't mean to imply that executions for corruption have stopped, my point was, that in spite of the the death penalty, corruption is still widespread in China.

I further believe that, as one of the other replies also stated, the fix for corruption is transparency. Unfortunately, barring a major shake up in China, massive transparency is not likely to happen in China anytime soon (think about the Great Firewall).

I don't believe that the death penalty for corruption is being applied consistently or fairly (in the sense of all people being equal under the law), and consequently it loses its deterrent effect.

This doesn't invalidate my points:

  1. That the Chinese government is facing an insurmountable task in attempting to stop corruption.
  2. That the Chinese government is quite concerned with staying in power, and this means that its goals of collecting information about corruption may not be limited to identifying corrupt officials.

Re:2007 is ten years ago? (1)

DavidShor (928926) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806468)

"In spite of much PR and many executions, corruption remains as widespread as ever. The death penalty certainly doesn't seem to be a deterrent against corruption."

All he is saying is that executions don't seem to effect corruption. Zheng Xiaoyu was just one of those executions.

Learn to read, then I might take your opinions "serious".

Re:Absolute power... (3, Interesting)

orzetto (545509) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805270)

The death penalty certainly doesn't seem to be a deterrent against corruption.

The death penalty is not a deterrent for anything. There are some pretty draconian laws for capital punishment for street crimes in the US, but it's not like those US states are safer than Canada because of that.

Corruption is deterred by transparency, street crime by welfare, equal opportunities and affirmative action, but the death penalty is a so much more spectacular way of convincing voters you are doing something about it when you are actually not.

Re:Absolute power... (2, Informative)

quacking duck (607555) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806652)

There's a critical difference with your capital punishment comparison.

China has executed some people fairly high up the food chain, like their FDA chief, or a bank official [pitt.edu] . These are not your regular, fairly anonymous people like those executed in US states, but are among the small, wealthy minority of people who wielded significant influence and power.

Slashdotters are always complaining about how laws never get passed that touch the wealthy in western countries, or they skip out of the country and retire in the Carribean, or how they always get cushy sentences. While there's still a lot wrong with the Chinese government, backing up your anti-corruption campaign by executing high-profile officials says to everyone that money and power are not enough to shield you from your crimes, and goes a long way to curbing such behaviour.

Re:Absolute power... (1)

jotok (728554) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806176)

Yes, by this is why cynicism and despair are enemies of democracy as much as corruption. All that has to happen for corrupt governments to remain in power is for people to say "Well, there's nothing that can be done, I'm just going to look out for myself."

Check out the ongoing election process in (e.g.) Morocco. There are tons of encouraging news articles but in the comments everyone says "Eh, our government is corrupt, nothing will change." It becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Hopefully out of China's ~1.3b people there are some with the courage to stand up to widespread corruption. Hopefully we can say the same about America and the rest of the world, too.

Re:Absolute power... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21807390)

Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. But it rocks absolutely, too. (Saw it on a despair.com poster)

tagged "humor"? (4, Insightful)

AlgorithMan (937244) | more than 6 years ago | (#21804984)

how can people tag this article with "humor"?
corrupt public servants are being executed in china,
so we are talking about a webinterface to a death-list here!

Re:tagged "humor"? (1)

jcuervo (715139) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805150)

Maybe if we did that in the States, we wouldn't be so screwed up right now.

Re:tagged "humor"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805174)

Because an "anti corruption" website mysteriously does not work? China has a lot of things against corruption, like the museum set to shame people convicted in the past of corruption. They even have instilled the death penalty yet corruption persists. Is anyone going to really be executed because of THIS LIST? hardly. Just like I highly doubt this website is run by the one government official in China that isn't corrupt... that's the amusing part.

IT'S A TRAP (with historical precent). (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805140)

The PRC has a poor track-record with government-endorsed whistleblower campaigns. Poor, as in thrown in jail.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundred_Flowers_Campaign [wikipedia.org]

Re:IT'S A TRAP (with historical precent). (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21806460)

Hmmm...

This type of campaign has loads of recent precedent, if the table at the bottom of the Three-Anti/Five-Anti campaign [wikipedia.org] page is any indication (it's linked from the one you cited). And, yes, in the past this sort of appeal for input/criticism has been turned around to identify and silence the critics.

Re:IT'S A TRAP (with historical precent). (1)

Jim in Buffalo (939861) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807180)

I believe you are exactly right. "Outing" corrupt public officials in China is, in and of itself, a punishable crime, for which people are jailed and tortured, and I'm sure this "website" is only an attempt to root out those with the temerity to do so in order to round them up and imprison them.

No Wonder, a 3MB Image on the Front Page (1)

njhunter (613589) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805412)

Curious icons of people, I've never before noticed many fair skinned, blond haired folks from the Middle Kingdom.

Death penalty for corruption - is this the game? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21805606)

Given the fact that for corruption there is a death penalty in China, I wouldn't be surprised if it would be the case for most complaints. If somebody wants to get rid of an enemy, there is no more convenient way to achieve it than this.

Similarly, it was a very popular game in Czechoslovakia during socialism, although no death penalty there. Lot of innocent people landed in jails afterwards.

Long live the wisdom of crowds (anonymous)!

Just funny, I don't want to login to slashdot, so I am posting this also anonymously. Merry Christmas to everyone :)

Bug in the calendar code (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 6 years ago | (#21805800)

One of the most ancient sites.
The calendar on their index page reads "December 24, 107" (The calendar is at the bottom-right corner. Chinese reads dates in Y-M-D order.)
Well, there has been a historical tradition of corruption in China.

great... (1)

superwiz (655733) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806246)

China leading US on civil rights.

Why the site is so slow (2)

Animats (122034) | more than 6 years ago | (#21806868)

The site has too much junk on it. No wonder the server is overloaded.

There are several .swf objects. Some are movies. There's a Javascript picture rotator. There seems to be server-side Java; if you try vote.jsp [mos.gov.cn] on the site, you get a Java backtrace.

The "vote" script is amusing. The web designer seems to have copied a "suggestion box" script from somewhere, then commented out the "vote" capability. It's so PRC. The government is terrified of their people voting on anything.

In other news... (1)

waa (159514) | more than 6 years ago | (#21807326)

In other news
The anti-corruption web server in the United States of America, housed in the vice presidient's office BLEW UP and started a 2 alarm fire last week.

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