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Black Hole Fires at Neighboring Galaxy

timothy posted more than 6 years ago | from the insert-space-cannon-noise dept.

Space 83

StarCraft 2 writes "This composite image shows the jet from a black hole at the center of a galaxy striking the edge of another galaxy, the first time such an interaction has been found. In the image, it is clearly seen how the jet from the main galaxy on the lower left is striking its companion galaxy to the upper right. The jet impacts the companion galaxy at its edge and is then disrupted and deflected, much like how a stream of water from a hose will splay out after hitting a wall at an angle. The composite image was made by combining data from Chandra, Hubble and several other systems."

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DUPE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21828834)

A few years ago, while browsing around the library downtown, I
had to take a piss. As I entered the john a big beautiful all-American
football hero type, about twenty-five, came out of one of the booths.
I stood at the urinal looking at him out of the corner of my eye as he
washed his hands. He didn't once look at me. He was "straight" and
married - and in any case I was sure I wouldn't have a chance with
him.

As soon as he left I darted into the booth he'd vacated,
hoping there might be a lingering smell of shit and even a seat still
warm from his sturdy young ass. I found not only the smell but the
shit itself. He'd forgotten to flush. And what a treasure he had left
behind. Three or four beautiful specimens floated in the bowl. It
apparently had been a fairly dry, constipated shit, for all were fat,
stiff, and ruggedly textured. The real prize was a great feast of turd
- a nine inch gastrointestinal triumph as thick as a man's wrist.

I knelt before the bowl, inhaling the rich brown fragrance and
wondered if I should obey the impulse building up inside me. I'd
always been a heavy rimmer and had lapped up more than one little
clump of shit, but that had been just an inevitable part of eating ass
and not an end in itself. Of course I'd had jerk-off fantasies of
devouring great loads of it (what rimmer hasn't), but I had never done
it. Now, here I was, confronted with the most beautiful five-pound
turd I'd ever feasted my eyes on, a sausage fit to star in any fantasy
and one I knew to have been hatched from the asshole of the world's
handsomest young stud.

Why not? I plucked it from the bowl, holding it with both
hands to keep it from breaking. I lifted it to my nose. It smelled
like rich, ripe limburger (horrid, but thrilling), yet had the
consistency of cheddar. What is cheese anyway but milk turning to shit
without the benefit of a digestive tract?

I gave it a lick and found that it tasted better then it
smelled. I've found since then that shit nearly almost does.

I hesitated no longer. I shoved the fucking thing as far into
my mouth as I could get it and sucked on it like a big brown cock,
beating my meat like a madman. I wanted to completely engulf it and
bit off a large chunk, flooding my mouth with the intense, bittersweet
flavor. To my delight I found that while the water in the bowl had
chilled the outside of the turd, it was still warm inside. As I chewed
I discovered that it was filled with hard little bits of something I
soon identified as peanuts. He hadn't chewed them carefully and they'd
passed through his body virtually unchanged. I ate it greedily,
sending lump after peanutty lump sliding scratchily down my throat. My
only regret was the donor of this feast wasn't there to wash it down
with his piss.

I soon reached a terrific climax. I caught my cum in the
cupped palm of my hand and drank it down. Believe me, there is no more
delightful combination of flavors than the hot sweetness of cum with
the rich bitterness of shit.

Afterwards I was sorry that I hadn't made it last longer. But
then I realized that I still had a lot of fun in store for me. There
was still a clutch of virile turds left in the bowl. I tenderly fished
them out, rolled them into my handkerchief, and stashed them in my
briefcase. In the week to come I found all kinds of ways to eat the
shit without bolting it right down. Once eaten it's gone forever
unless you want to filch it third hand out of your own asshole. Not an
unreasonable recourse in moments of desperation or simple boredom.

I stored the turds in the refrigerator when I was not using
them but within a week they were all gone. The last one I held in my
mouth without chewing, letting it slowly dissolve. I had liquid shit
trickling down my throat for nearly four hours. I must have had six
orgasms in the process.

I often think of that lovely young guy dropping solid gold out
of his sweet, pink asshole every day, never knowing what joy it could,
and at least once did, bring to a grateful shiteater.

First time? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21828840)

Apparently it's not the first time, or this article is a dupe of a previous article [slashdot.org] . (I think the latter is just a bit more likely.)

Re:First time? (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829100)

I think it's a dupe. According to my user page here, I submitted "Intergfalactic particle beam spotted" on Monday December 17, @04:53PM. It was rejected, but someone else submitted the same story and it was posted.

I should have made a journal out of it, because I remember being in a silly mood that day and made quips about an intergalactic war. Peobably said something about a Romulan hull breach or something. On retrospect if I'd seen my submission in the firehose I'd have clicked the minus sign too.

Now for a bit of on-topic wild science fiction conjecture: If a civilization that was far enough advanced that they had interstellar travel decided to try and reach a neighboring galaxy, it seems that just like we primitive apes use a planet's gravity to accellerate probes like Voyager to slingshot them out of the solar system, perhaps this is an intergalactic probe. An advanced civilization may be using a black hole to slingshot scientific instruments to its neighboring galaxy.

Of course, if you really want to get science fictiony, maybe it's an intergalactic war?

For you mundane, "just the fax maam" nerds, well, you're probably right. It's probably just a coincidental natural phenomenon.

-mcgrew

Intergalactic Psyops = Redundant Dupe Posting (1)

WED Fan (911325) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829420)

...made quips about an intergalactic war.

I believe the dupe is a psyop by the Department of Galactic Security.

Also, be very careful and keep an eye on your cubicle. I've read your post and I believe someone is moving the keys around on your keyboard. I'd put up a cam to catch the culprit if I were you.

Re:First time? (1)

DiniZuli (621956) | more than 6 years ago | (#21831462)

I was thinking the same thing when I read the article. It's a galactic version of what Larry Niven's Ringworld engineers came up with (They are "shooting" with a star to destroy meteors and enemies).

Re:First time? (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832254)

That's why I frackin' HATE trying to submit to Slash. It's probably best to first post it in your journal, THEN submit. I guess it boils down to who knows who, and how well written the submission summary is.

Slash could avoid the moderator/submitter favoritism by revamping the journal system to look at the weight of a journal that is submitted for sharing. The item URL could be fed to the major search engines, then pushed to the top based on the number of qualitative and AUTHORITATIVE links.

For example, NPR, among others, talked about this black hole bullying it's neighbor DAYS ago.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17371531 [npr.org]

I think the URLs submitted for consideration should not depend on the half-baked commentary by moderators or anyone. The lead-in by the journal should be professional enough-- if it is via a professional journal. This would give a fairer shot to many who lack cute writing skills and yet who deserve some face time instead of the same-old same-old submitters. After all, Slash has THOUSANDS of members, yet only a FEW seem to be privileged to be recognized submitters/moderators named.

Re:First time? (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832326)

For example:

The Body Has A Mind of Its Own (broadcast Friday, December 21st, 2007)
http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/200712214 [sciencefriday.com]
--
Toxic Homes and Household Toxins (broadcast Friday, December 14th, 2007)
http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/200712144 [sciencefriday.com]
--
Exposed: the seven great medical myths
http://news.independent.co.uk/health/article3273183.ece [independent.co.uk]
--
Testing Toys for Lead
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16951320 [npr.org]

Re:First time? (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832684)

I'm not bothered too much by having someone else get their submission posted instead of mine, especially since I've had eight posted this year. I do wish that the editors would do a quick google before an item is posted just to check for dupes, since every article that is remotely similar to some other article has every third comment yelling DUPE!1!!!ONE!!!

As to journals, I mostly like using mine to talk about hookers [slashdot.org] and my other friends. [slashdot.org]

Re:First time? (4, Funny)

provigilman (1044114) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829900)

There's a simpler explanation. Obviously the black hole particle jet is producing a tachyon emission that's made it's way to the Milky Way and is now causing us to relive the same /. stories over, and over, and over, and over, and over...

Re:First time? (3, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829940)

Not all intergalactic problems can be reduced to a simple Star Trek formula. :P

Re:First time? (1)

dpilot (134227) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830250)

But apparently some can.

Re:First time? (4, Funny)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830456)

Not all intergalactic problems can be reduced to a simple Star Trek formula.

But they can all be solved by reversing the polarity.

Re:First time? (1, Funny)

jank1887 (815982) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830932)

or crossing the streams

Re:First time? (0)

hxftw (996114) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832760)

or leaving the basement

Re:First time? (1)

Surlyboi (96917) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832980)

My god, it's full of stars...

Re:First time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21832278)

There's a simpler explanation. Obviously the black hole particle jet is producing a tachyon emission that's made it's way to the Milky Way and is now causing us to relive the same /. stories over, and over, and over, and over, and over...

Re:First time? (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 6 years ago | (#21837980)

So what is it?

Re:First time? (1)

sjs132 (631745) | more than 6 years ago | (#21836024)

Just a hic-up in the Matrix... Soon the DAJa-Vu feelings will subside.

It's scary... (4, Interesting)

JerryLove (1158461) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828844)

It's scary just how many different things out there seem waiting to kill you; from asteroids to stellar explosions to, now, death-star black-holes.

On the other hand: I'd imagine it's terribly useful to see what a galaxy does to such an emission. It's got to tell us a lot about things like the real density of the glactic body, and to what extent, if any, a galaxy clears space around it.

Re:It's scary... (3, Funny)

eebra82 (907996) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828912)

It's scary just how many different things out there seem waiting to kill you; from asteroids to stellar explosions to, now, death-star black-holes.
It's safe to say that you're exposed to a more probable danger when you're sitting in a car. Of course, if you get space-rayed while sitting in a car, you're pretty much doomed.

Re:It's scary... (2, Interesting)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829118)

It's scary just how many different things out there seem waiting to kill you; from asteroids to stellar explosions to, now, death-star black-holes.

I think your chances of dying from cancer, heart disease, auto accident, industrial accident, old age or even 'teh terrists' (unlikely as dying from a terrorist attack is) ar far, far greater than dying from some extraterrestrial phenomenon.

But no matter how you're going to die, you're going to die. There's no point in fearing the inevitable. We are all under a sentence of death. Enjoy your time in this universe while you're still here to do so.

-mcgrew

Re: Actually already had cancer (1)

JerryLove (1158461) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829614)

But fair enough. Perhaps I should have said "It's impressive the quantity and variety of things waiting to kill you". I'm not actually "scared". My poor choice of wording.

Re: Actually already had cancer (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829686)

What's funny is that I'm not afraid of dying, [kuro5hin.org] but I don't like to think about the incredible suffering that almost always preceeds it.

Re:It's scary... (1)

ClubStew (113954) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832678)

We should welcome our Black Hole Weapon-wielding overlords...before they fire at us, too.

death-star black holes (1, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828866)

Are they sure its really a black hole...... I feel a great disturbance in the force.

Re:death-star black holes (3, Funny)

coldcell (714061) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828922)

That's no moon!

Re:death-star black holes (2, Funny)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829138)

That's no moon!

If course it isn't, silly. It's a black hole [slashdot.org] .

-mcgrew
Happy nude year! [slashdot.org]

Re:death-star black holes (1)

PingPongBoy (303994) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830796)

moon

Speaking of which, if a deadly intergalactic ray was ever pointed at us, our best bet for immediate survival would be to move to the moon, the poles, or into orbit and constantly move to the side opposite the ray.

Since the ray is disruptive of the magnetic field, a generator might be constructed to counteract the disruption, at a risk of messing up the earth's magnetic generator.

Re:death-star black holes (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21828928)

The galaxy shot first.

Re:death-star black holes (3, Funny)

east coast (590680) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829042)

The distrubance you feel is Sir Alec Guinness spinning in his grave from knowing that his most quoted line from film was from Star Wars.

Re:death-star black holes (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829380)

Dedicated Cthulhu Cultist since 4523 BC.
..newbie.

Learn more (5, Informative)

eebra82 (907996) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828878)

Check this link [google.com] to learn more about this phenomenon. It's a BBC documentary well worth your time.

Re:Learn more (1)

jdc180 (125863) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829000)

Or this link http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/12/17/2149239/ [slashdot.org] to learm more about this phenomenon or to learn what witty posts will earn you +5 Funny.

Re:Learn more (1)

jdc180 (125863) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829018)

Re:Learn more (2, Funny)

iacvlvs (1155873) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829074)

Same black hole. Different galaxy.
This is a joke.

Re:Learn more (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829342)

Actually this does pose a threat to us. The gigantic and devastatingly destructive waves of force caused by the post impact 'IMPRESSIVE' are as we read this, heading our way.

Re:Learn more (1)

chris411 (610359) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830940)

I'm about a quarter of the way through the documentary. It's interesting. But while I'm all in favor of 'spicing' things up to make science more thrilling to the layman, I sometimes couldn't help but chuckle at the overblown visual effects and dramatic descriptions.

Pew Pew Pew! (1)

Braintrust (449843) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828884)

Pew!

How long? (1)

s!lat (975103) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828924)

This is all well and good, but how long till someone tries to mount one of these to a shark?

Re:How long? (1)

SpecTheIntro (951219) | more than 6 years ago | (#21839466)

Or, God forbid, a killer badger? [wikipedia.org]

'Death Star' galaxy (3, Interesting)

the_kanzure (1100087) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828932)

Over at the Orion's Arm [orionsarm.com] mailing list a week ago, this topic came up too: they were calling it a 'death star' galaxy.

Or possibly a Type III Kardashev civ [wikipedia.org] taking issue with the occupants of a nearby galaxy (or *maybe* an S6 or even S7 Galaxy Brain trying to insure a rival doesn't achieve the same status and threaten it?)! Looks like a cosmic beat-down either way!
Anyway, the galaxies have many awesome processes -- nebulas, supernovae, supermassive blackholes and that strange darkmatter 'void' -- some that we can, perhaps, take advantage of.

HUBRIS!!! (2, Insightful)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829268)

Anyway, the galaxies have many awesome processes -- nebulas, supernovae, supermassive blackholes and that strange darkmatter 'void' -- some that we can, perhaps, take advantage of.

Look, dude, we're really really stupid and primitive*. We don't even understand subatomic phenomena very well. We are incredibly, mind-numbingly ignorant. There's a far greater chance that rather than taking advantage of these processes, they will take advantage of US.

-mcgrew

*Offtopic here, but I think the idea of alians from space visiting earth is really silly. What are the odds? I think it far more likely that if UFOs are aliens, they're from the one and only planet that we know has life.

We have only been here as a species for a hundred thousand years. Ten million years ago we were small mouselike things. What will our descendants be like ten million years in the future? If time travel is possible they will have figured out how to accomplish it. I think if the Roswell aliens are real and non-human (actually I don't, I think they're "Skunk Works"), they are the species we evolve into going back for a little archaeology.

Fire back! (4, Funny)

Nerdposeur (910128) | more than 6 years ago | (#21828946)

If the other galaxy doesn't learn to fight back now, it's going to get pushed around for the rest of its life.

Re:Fire back! (1)

Duhavid (677874) | more than 6 years ago | (#21831522)

All it is doing is washing away the rain.

Leave it be.

Re:Fire back! (1)

mseidl (828824) | more than 6 years ago | (#21832700)

I'll bust a gap(of dark matter) at yo ass!

Dupe avoiding suggestion (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21828986)

This story is a dupe. http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/11/10/2123233 [slashdot.org]

We get lots of dupes. Perhaps the editors could use google to screen for them. I put the following into google to find this dupe:

black hole blasts site:slashdot.org

but

black hole chandra site:slashdot.org

worked even better.

Re:Dupe avoiding suggestion (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829302)

Naw, they're far too busy editing to google. Especially Cowboy Neal.

Re:Dupe avoiding suggestion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21831254)

The duplicate article problem is always going to be just that, a problem. I'd be quite surprised if the editors even read the articles that they linked to themselves in many cases, let alone the content of their own posts. At worst a duplicate post will generate traffic and ad-banner hits from a bunch of people complaining that it's a dupe, in which case they still win.

First time? No, this is the second time... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21828998)

it's been on /. http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/12/17/2149239 [slashdot.org]

Nice to see the editors are asleep at the wheel during the holidays though.

Re:First time? No, this is the second time... (1)

pryoplasm (809342) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829252)

It is not as if dupes come but only once a year.

Its a full time job being asleep at the wheel all year round...

The difference this time around... (1)

rHBa (976986) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830826)

The difference this time around is that TFA has some cool, high def pics that I can crop for my desktop wallpaper :-)

PS (6.9 MB) [harvard.edu]
Tiff (43.4 MB) [harvard.edu]

Breaking news! (1, Redundant)

uberphear (984901) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829014)

Slashdot sprays dupe-posting editors with jets from black holes: http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/12/17/2149239 [slashdot.org]

Re:Breaking news! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21829082)

And in other breaking news, Sony is releasing a new never seen before cutting edge game system. Rumors are that it will be called a "PlayStation".

that's no blackhole (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829026)

It's a space station!

Dupe? (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829032)

Wasn't this black hole shooting at a galaxy last week? Or was it a different hole?

Re:Dupe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21829064)

I believe the time dilation field created by the event caused some of us to hear about it last week.

Re:Dupe? (1)

computerchimp (994187) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829168)

Sort of a catch22:

If it is another black hole it is common and not so newsworthy.
If it is the same black hole it is old and so newsworthy.

cc
PS: its the same black hole, the poster is just a bit slow on the uptake. I suspect that it was posted to see how many Star Wars postings would be made for the annual Slashdot year end pool.

Re:Dupe? (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829332)

Wasn't this black hole shooting at a galaxy last week? Or was it a different hole?

Yeah, here's the newspaper story [ajc.com] .

Re:Dupe? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 6 years ago | (#21833178)

It was reloading.

Holy Old news Batman (1)

netglen (253539) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829090)

Are the /. editors asleep today? This is old news.

Black hole fires neighboring galaxy (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829350)

"Yo, c'mere."

"Yes maam?"

"You doin' a piss po' job. We ain't had no johns 'round hea fo' days."

"But it's the holidays, it's always slow this time of year."

"Don' matta, yo fired!"

Paraphrasing Don Imus.... (2, Funny)

trailerparkcassanova (469342) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829444)

That's some nappy-headed holes there. I'm gonna tell you that now, man....

I've always wondered... (1, Interesting)

Epistax (544591) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829520)

I've always wondered if all black holes do this but we simply aren't able to tell from our perspective. Such as a pen laser, you can't really tell if it's on unless it's aimed at or near your eye, if you can see what it is hitting, or if there is something in the air to illuminate. This would certainly go in line with the theory that black holes can never actually exist. That is, everything that appears to be a black hole is on the teetering edge of becoming one at all times, but constantly bleeds matter so no event horizon can form.

I have no formal education in this stuff nor have I even bothered to read a book, but I'm full of poorly educated gut feelings on the matter!

Re:I've always wondered... (1)

AdamThor (995520) | more than 6 years ago | (#21831894)

Here is my possibly erroneous understanding, based on my undergraduate degree in physics.

I've always wondered if all black holes do this but we simply aren't able to tell from our perspective.

Any black hole into which stuff falls xrays emerge from. This is electromagnetic radiation, not matter. Yes, yes, energy/matter equivelency notwithstanding, it's light that comes out, not rocks and stuff.

Here's how it works. A black hole sucks things into it. When things go in the black hole, they spin around it on the way down, like water going down your bathtub drain. The varying amount of spin at different distances from the sucking object tends to pull things apart. Eventually things get really pulled apart, down to an atomic level, and ionized. Ions have charge. Charges acclerating in a circle make an electromagnetic wave, perpendicular to the plane of rotation (right hand rule). When the acceleration is big, the energy of the resulting electromagnetic wave is high. Black hole = big acceleration = high energy output. Things are torn up and spun around the black hole when they are still outside of the event horizon (the line of no return, where escape velocity becomes equal to the speed of light), so the energy is able to escape the black hole.

Such as a pen laser, you can't really tell if it's on unless it's aimed at or near your eye, if you can see what it is hitting, or if there is something in the air to illuminate.

Astronomers can see this. Space is mostly empty, but there's enough stuff to scatter this effect that it is known.

This would certainly go in line with the theory that black holes can never actually exist. That is, everything that appears to be a black hole is on the teetering edge of becoming one at all times, but constantly bleeds matter so no event horizon can form.

Speaking energetically about a black hole is kinda wierd. My understanding is that the energy coming from the black hole in this story was never actually in the black hole. The black hole isn't bleeding energy (much less matter) at the nearby galaxy, rather the act of falling into the black hole liberates some potential energy from the matter that is falling. (Anything that has the potential to fall has potential energy, this PE is the source) Black holes can (maybe) evaporate (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation [wikipedia.org] ), but that isn't what is happening here.

I have no formal education in this stuff nor have I even bothered to read a book, but I'm full of poorly educated gut feelings on the matter!

=) So I thought I'd provide some possibly approximately correct information for you or anyone else who in the same boat.

Haiku Response below (1)

mandark1967 (630856) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829564)

I, for one, welcome
Our dupe posting overlords
Now see sig below

Must be female! (0, Flamebait)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829576)

Beware a black hole scorned!

Black holes SUCK (1)

coniote (513936) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829580)

Literally

1.4 billion years ago called (5, Funny)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829806)

They want their news back.

I for one... (1)

Salsaman (141471) | more than 6 years ago | (#21829808)

...welcome our jet-shooting-black-hole overlords.

(Well, somebody had to say it...).

Natural Phenomenon or First Strike? (1)

uxbn_kuribo (1146975) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830042)

The creatures that are responsible for this will destroy us all!

What happened to /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21830446)

Obviously there is something wrong with the system. Duplicate stories (someone isn't checking the history). New interesting stories dropped (why?). Way too many comedian wannabes. I wish the old /. would come back.

the headline should have been (1)

sethg (15187) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830712)

"Black hole sucks, blows"

Tagging (1)

Frigga's Ring (1044024) | more than 6 years ago | (#21830910)

What are the tags for this story. Let's see... science, space, starwars, moneyshot, and cumshot... Wait a second... what the heck does this story have to do with Star Wars?!

oops my bad (1)

escay (923320) | more than 6 years ago | (#21831166)

who does the black hole think he is? Dick Cheney?

Fp cUM... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21831232)

sh1t? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21831594)

AAl our times have irrecoverable

News? (1)

Hellpop (451893) | more than 6 years ago | (#21831652)

This has been going on for millions of years! How is this news?

Oh, it's a new discovery... Well, didn't I hear about this a few weeks ago over on Slashdot?

Oh, I am on Slashdot? I must have forgotten. Deja Vu...

This black-hole is a bully (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21833008)

This is the second galaxy in a couple of weeks it has fired dark-matter at. Somebody should stand up to it!

Ow (1)

stonefry (968479) | more than 6 years ago | (#21834542)

Quit it...

the scale seems off (1)

brer_rabbit (195413) | more than 6 years ago | (#21834548)

According to the scale in this photo [harvard.edu] , these galaxies are only half the size of Stonehenge.

Something I heard (1)

WillyG00 (1209056) | more than 6 years ago | (#21835352)

"Los agujeros negros son lugares del universo en donde Dios dividió por cero" - Steven Wright in english: "The Black Holes are places of the universe where God divided by zero" - Steven Wright beautiful description...

/. editors fire great yawns at stories (1)

dreamsofcaffeine (1140619) | more than 6 years ago | (#21836844)

As seen in other stories, our editors are obviously doing other things than checking if stories are actually dupes. But at least they've got a fine excuse: They still have not received their caffeine infusions due to their high level of social activity during Christmas.
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