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BitMicro Takes Wraps Off 832 GB Flash Drive

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 6 years ago | from the will-only-cost-an-arm-a-leg-and-your-firstborn dept.

Data Storage 241

Lucas123 writes "BitMicro has unveiled an 832GB NAND flash drive that will begin shipping later this year. The E-Disk Altima drive is expected to have sustained read rates of up to 100MB/sec and up to 20,000 I/O operations per second. The device features a SATA 3.0 G/bps interface. No pricing as of yet."

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241 comments

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Oxymoron (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945284)

Is what it is.

SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945286)

_0_
\''\
'=o='
.|!|
.| |
goatse takes wraps off lower intestine [goatse.ch]

Re:SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945340)

quit posting pictures of your face!

Re:SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (0, Flamebait)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945804)

It's reassuring to know that there are people more retarded than me knocking about.. I come here regularly cause I'm a hopeless geek. This person hates coming here yet lives here to spam his photo album..

Mortgage? (5, Informative)

mudetroit (855132) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945290)

Unless they came up with some radically cheaper method of producting them this will basically probably require a mortgage to go out and buy.

Re:Mortgage? (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946006)

I think sacrificing your first born (or at the very least his college fund) will be more in line.

Re:Mortgage? (2, Interesting)

xENoLocO (773565) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946096)

Yes, but can it run on USB power?

Re:Mortgage? (3, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946260)

Well, maybe I'm not up to date, but I always thought first-borns run on food, just like anyone else.

Re:Mortgage? (1)

AuntieWillow (1188799) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946104)

Want One!
And although it will take a mortgage, you won't have to vacuum your ssd :)
(Or mow the lawn!)

i'm about to take the wraps off of my flash drive (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945294)

if you know what i'm talking about!!!!!

POS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945296)

POS

Sorry (1, Insightful)

rodrigoandrade (713371) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945320)

If I can't buy it yet, then it doesn't exist yet.

Re:Sorry (2, Insightful)

the_g_cat (821331) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945730)

Mmh, I can't remember being able (all financial considerations put aside) to buy a Soyouz, an Arianne V or a Spache Suttle for that matter. Does this mean they don't exist?

Re:Sorry (1, Funny)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945782)

Yes

Re:Sorry (0, Flamebait)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946004)

If I can't buy it yet, then it doesn't exist yet.
Umm, yeah, let's mod this comment up for every story about an announced product. "Specs for the Playstation 4..." "Yeah, but it's vapor until I can buy it. (Score 3, Interesting)"

Wise use of mod-points, there.

Re:Sorry (5, Funny)

modecx (130548) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946066)

If I can't buy it yet, then it doesn't exist yet.

F-22 Raptor: so expensive that it's practically invisible!

cost estimate (4, Interesting)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945324)

The cheapest I ever heard of a 2 GB flash drive was about $15, so this is over 400 of those put together or $6000. Even if they had some volume discount, I think anything under $1000 for an 800+GB flash drive is unthinkable... right?

Re:cost estimate (3, Funny)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945400)

the same could be said of a 800 GB hard drive years ago. i'll explain in mathematical terms: as time, thats our X axis, increases, the Y value decreases. If you guessed Y to be the cost, give yourself a chimichanga. If you guessed Y to be anything else including, but not limited to, goat milk, give yourself a wedgie.

Re:cost estimate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945758)

Yeah, years from now they may be giving them away free in cereal boxes, but '192939495969798999' is talking about today, not years from now.

Re:cost estimate (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945818)

zOMG that means cars should be like $5.99 now since they were hella expensive back in the day, right?

lrn2economics

Re:cost estimate (4, Funny)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946028)

the curve of time to car value is far different from the curve of technology value over time. For example, a car is considered an antique after a certain period of time, in which its value goes up (if properly maintained and restored)!

try selling a nintendo or an old watch calculator made in the 80s in 10 years, I doubt you'll get more than a 5-10 bucks. The point is, the car analogy has yet again made someone look like an idiot :P

Re:cost estimate (2, Interesting)

Andrew Kismet (955764) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946176)

Which Nintendo? Because a Nintendo Virtual Boy will definitely go UP in value over the next 10 years.
The NES/Famicom probably won't go up much, but as supply drops due to (1) no longer being manufactured (2) damage and disrepair over time, the price of a pristine NES will definitely go up.

Re:cost estimate (2, Funny)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945962)

I am confused. Surely the global population of pirates factors into the equation somehow?

Re:cost estimate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21946254)

the same could be said of a 800 GB hard drive years ago. i'll explain in mathematical terms: as time, thats our X axis, increases, the Y value decreases. If you guessed Y to be the cost, give yourself a chimichanga. If you guessed Y to be anything else including, but not limited to, goat milk, give yourself a wedgie.

If you don't think too good, don't think too much.

Re:cost estimate (3, Informative)

TeknoDragon (17295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945446)

more likely they will be using anything from 4gb - 64gb chips (Samsung announced 25/10/07)

If they are shooting for video editing only that price would be right, but the enthusiast & business market will IMO want something under $2000. TFA suggests business application.

Re:cost estimate (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945568)

32 GB NAND Flash SSDs are going $250. This would be about $6500, which is inline with your numbers. I will personally be shocked if it comes in below $5000. SSDs are high price and currently a niche market at best. Honestly, they need to fill the gap with more varied size drives. 32 GB are really the most reasonably priced.

Re:cost estimate (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945736)

Be sure to look at $/MB prices from around the time when hard disks were still measured in MB. That was just 15 years ago. Now we're on the verge of 1TB hard disks becoming mainstream. It's funny how people who have grown up right in the epicenter of the most staggering miniaturization and integration races of all time still don't grasp what "2 times the performance or capacity in x months" means.

Re:cost estimate (2, Informative)

rogerdewhite (1214578) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945828)

2GB spot prices for MLC are ~$5.50...so we're talking $2,300 for the raw MLC NAND alone. Considering this thing is probably built with SLC NAND and you're looking at $5,000+ for the NAND...add in controllers, boards, packaging & profit and suddenly $6,000 looks like a screaming deal.

Re:cost estimate (1)

tdelaney (458893) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945990)

I read that this one actually uses MLC. Don't know how that fits with the 100MB/s, but then I'm in software, not hardware.

rugged field computers (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946048)

Maybe the miltary or JPL would adopt these first, willing to pay $10-20K for a terabyte solid-state non-violatile memory. Its still cheaper to have a company do these for you than to have them custom built.

new iPod in the fall? (1)

ksheff (2406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945328)

What form factor do the current hard drive based iPods use? 1.8"? I can see Apple wanting a smaller version of this for their next gen devices.

Sweet (1)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945330)

Now Apple has the technology to support flash based player of HD content in a year or two, once the price of this drops. 832 Gigs should be enough for at least 50 HD movies.

Re:Sweet (1)

bagboy (630125) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945390)

Why would you want to watch a HD Movie on that tiny-ass screen? Good waste of bits if you ask me.....

Re:Sweet (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945638)

The Creative Zen players have infrared remotes!

Re:Sweet (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945648)

I have a Nano and I watch movies and TV shows on it all the time. Mind you, they are encoded at 320x240 so as not to eat up too much space, but If I had 800 GB of space I probably wouldn't take the time to convert the file especially for my iPod.

Re:Sweet (1)

jay42jay (1199817) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945786)

iPods have a really low maximum resolution. In fact the highest resolution it can display is really for its video out and if you watch it on your screen you're still only getting at 320x240. Do you really think they make 3" 720p screens? Even if they did you've have to use a magnifying glass to reap the benefit. Besides, you can't just stick any video on there and expect it to work.

Re:Sweet (1)

Bandman (86149) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945904)

Right. But the port on the bottom can output to whatever you'd like, and play it on your 90" DLP TV

Re:Sweet (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945416)

Don't you mean like 20 HD movies? And plus, since when has Apple ever made a decision that would benefit the customer. Their servers can't handle downloading HD movies so they say screw it. Plus who would watch it on a tiny screen? It's HD! I don't think the screen can even display 1280 pixels across (which I think is 720p).
The one and only reason I'd buy that drive is to speed up my boot time cuz it's been slow forever and it's all hard drive IO that takes it forever. The processor doesn't even max and I've got 2GB of fast ram. Other than that, maybe web servers could use this to really quickly serve up tons of tiny files. That actually would be a pretty significant upgrade to web servers.

Re:Sweet (4, Interesting)

Firehed (942385) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945612)

Why would you waste that much space as part of a disk with effectively zero seek time on HD movies? They don't need that kind of performance - even a 4200RPM standard hard drive would have more than enough throughput (and with tech like accelerometer-based head parking, durability shouldn't be too much of an issue). Use it as an OS disk. Better yet, use it for databases - the seek times would be fantastic for the application, and unless you're constantly updating rows (rather than just inserting new ones), the write cycle limit on flash-based storage is unlikely to become an issue.

It's not as if you need a portable video library anyways. Stick a few on your device and go. Your battery life is by far going to be the limiting factor. Apple would be much better off trying to create a mobile video streaming device than to waste so much flash memory on a portable device.

Sure, in five years then I'll probably have a terabyte of flash memory in my car key that only costs eight bucks. And at that point, this kind of thing would make sense. Right now, that's a TON of flash storage that would carry a huge price that would make it beyond impractical for portables. If you want a mobile HD player, create something with a 720p screen and one of those brand new 500GB laptop drives and stick half a gig of RAM in as a massive buffer.

Sounds awesome (2, Insightful)

angryfirelord (1082111) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945334)

Too bad that it'll probably cost more than my car. :p

Re:Sounds awesome (1)

GregPK (991973) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945380)

Only if you drive a domestic. ;)

hmm. (3, Funny)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945364)

no idea of pricing yet, but several major limbs and a contract signed in your own bodily fluid was hinted at.

832GB SSD?! holy cow thats going to be dear.

Now tell me why anybody should want this outside of the media/video industry...

Re:hmm. (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945386)

Now tell me why anybody should want this outside of the media/video industry...

a porn hoarder who demands high performance?

Re:hmm. (5, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945402)

Now tell me why anybody should want this outside of the media/video industry...

We've found Bill Gates' Slashdot user account.

Re:hmm. (1)

TeknoDragon (17295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945482)

:)

I'd take one for my gaming laptop. I could live with something as small as 200 gigs, but if they're going to give me 4x that much I'll take it!

Re:hmm. (2, Funny)

MBCook (132727) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945674)

I would have thought he would have had a much lower UID.

Or did you lose your password a few times Bill?

Re:hmm. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945408)

If your not gonna have the biggest E.penis it may as well be the fastest.

Re:hmm. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945994)

"If your not gonna have the biggest E.penis it may as well be the fastest"

Perhaps you are unaware that "fastest" in this context is generally not considered a good thing?

Re:hmm. (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945448)

Hassle free household media server?

The various media in my house, shared among four PC's comes to well over 600Gb. It would be more, but I don't have the room to rip all my DvDs yet, and it grows, thanks to my various subscriptions, by several Gb a month. Having all that on one fast access solid state device would be serious bonus.

Re:hmm. (1)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945572)

You don't actually need really fast disks on the backend to serve up streaming video etc. to front-ends. Remember it's compressed until it gets decoded by the front-end, that helps. For instance I have an HDHomerun that can stream two HD streams from OTA or QAM tuners - it has a 100meg NIC on it and uses less than 10megs with both streams going. They have an 8 tuner unit - it has a Gig NIC on it and really, are you can't stream faster than the NIC anyway right? 5400RPM IDE drives can handle your HD video streaming needs so long as everyone in the house doesn't hit the same disk for different streams all at once.

Re:hmm. (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945592)

Why? You could pick up two 500GB drives for less than $300 (CDN) and have 1TB of space for a very reasonable cost. SATA drives in a RAID setup can break 200MB/sec sustained read. Unless you trying to watch 10 movies at the same time, you're not going to need any more than what SATA can provide now, and at substantially lower cost. Heck, buy 3 or more drives go RAID 5 and get some redundancy out of it as well.

Re:hmm. (5, Insightful)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945456)

Now tell me why anybody should want this outside of the media/video industry...
To lower power consumption/size/weight of laptops?

Re:hmm. (2, Insightful)

Wordsmith (183749) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945466)

For all the same reasons someone would want a big hard drive (I've got a TB in a mainstream machine that cost me just over $1,000, and I'm sure I'll someday use it up with various media I've purchased, downloaded or recorded off TV). And they might prefer this due to the longer life, better access speed and lack of noisy moving parts.

-Lou

Re:hmm. (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945504)

i would love to have a raid 5 setup with this on the db server here at work.. with that kind of sustained data rate .. hummmm

Re:hmm. (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945558)

Exactly. But I'm thinking more of a raid 10 fibre channel san. Maybe in a couple years when the price/performance hits the right mark.

Re:hmm. (1)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945614)

Because he can?

Re:hmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945754)

I don't know why you'd _need_ 832 GB, but this is essentially a hard drive replacement, with the added benefit of access speed not scaling inversely with size.
You probably only need something 10-30% that size right now, but who's complaining? There's no advantage to making it smaller.

Re:hmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21946058)

There's no advantage to making it smaller.
Uh, cost?

Re:hmm. (5, Interesting)

sc7007 (26649) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945814)

Now tell me why anybody should want this outside of the media/video industry...
I work in the seismic data processing industry (oil and gas exploration). We regularly (almost every project) deliver datasets to clients that are on the orders of 1-5 TB. Many of our milestone QC datasets for clients are 500-750 GB. Putting these on a flash drive or portable hard drive is much faster than a bunch of 3592E tapes, plus easier and quicker for the client to access. Flash drives certainly have the advantage over USB hard disks of being faster to write to (usually). If these were cheap enough, and they will be at some point, I could see these being commonly used. On the other hand, maybe just a solid state portable disk drive, which these are just a variant of, will be cheaper (time and money).

Re:hmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945830)

Databases. Scientific applications.

Re:hmm. (1)

Fweeky (41046) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945874)

25*76G 2.5" 15kRPM drives + shelf: ~£6500, ~900G RAID-10, ~4000 IOPS, 2U + server, 200W.

2*832G 2.5" SSD: £????, 800G RAID-1, ~40,000 IOPS, fits in 1U server, 10W.

They could be £5k each and still be rather attractive, though the crappy write performance on SSD's reduces their appeal rather a lot.

Yawn (2, Informative)

Rie Beam (632299) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945432)

They've already announced a 1.6TB flash drive for launch around mid-2008 [bitmicro.com] .

Re:Yawn (2, Informative)

MTgeekMAN (700406) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945724)

Yes, but that 1.6 TB drive is Fiber Chanel. The one in the article is a 2.5" SATA drive. Much more useful for the average person.

832? (2, Insightful)

teslar (706653) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945470)

Well, that's an odd number, what's the motivation behind it? I can see that 832 = 512 + 256 + 64 = 2^9 + 2^8 + 2^6, but I still fail to see the logic there.

Re:832? (5, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945520)

Well, that's an odd number

No. It is even.

Re:832? (1)

TeknoDragon (17295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945524)

generational storage pools to assist with write-leveling perhaps?

Re:832? (5, Informative)

Rickz0rz (831049) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945530)

832 = 64 * 13 Perhaps they are using 13 64mB modules.

Re:832? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945732)

what is a millibyte?

Re:832? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945892)

what is a millibyte?


An eighth of a bit? I guess that would be just the little serif hanging off the top of the 1.

Or maybe it's a 45 degree arc of a 0.

Re:832? (3, Funny)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946248)

what is a millibyte?
It's what you'll be getting from my pet mPede shortly =)

Re:832? (4, Insightful)

mr_mischief (456295) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945800)

The thing is, 13's not exactly a power of two. To access 13 modules, you'd need the same 4 control lines as 16 modules. Perhaps it's actually 16 * 64 and three are specifically for redundancy and wear leveling?

Re:832? (1)

EMH_Mark3 (305983) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946120)

Who cares about control lines? The flash chips are what's expensive, not the addressing lines.

Re:832? (2, Interesting)

araemo (603185) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946182)

Perhaps they couldn't physically fit more than 13 modules into the same space as a 3.5" HDD?

Either way, it nicely explains the 1.6TB version (128MB modules instead of 64MB modules..)

Re:832? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945914)

probably 64 * 16, 13 of which "usable", since this is a professional unit it's expected to have a few chips for redundancy.

U3 (1)

OglinTatas (710589) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946244)

They are probably using 16 modules, but 192 GB is reserved for that damned U3 partition.

Yeah, I'm still waiting for a Linux or OS X U3 removal tool, because I don't do Windows.

It's twice 416 (2, Interesting)

Kilraven (1101873) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945964)

Which was their previous high late last year.

http://www.bitmicro.com/press_news_releases_20070911.php [bitmicro.com]

The bit I'm slightly skeptical on is the environmental specs. While -40C and +85C are becoming a more common standard, not many SSD manufacturers can reliably hit past -25C and +75C. This may not seem that big of a deal, but in some industries - which would currently be the only ones spending Close to the $10k (judging by current pricing for extended/extreme versions of these drives) for them initially - this is huge if true.

I want one (4, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945488)

I think I'm going to need a bigger keychain.

nothing to see here... (0)

bcrowell (177657) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945506)

...move along. No price, no specific release date, not yet in beta, no evidence that they actually have working hardware.

The sweet spot right now seems to be around 16 or 32 Mb. You can get an 16 Mb flash drive for about $150, but 32 Mb is more than twice the price. The article speculates that there will be demand soon for huge flash drives on high-performance servers. Wouldn't it make more sense to accomplish the same thing with a hybrid drive that has both a platter and flash inside? It seems more likely that flash-only will continue to be adopted on laptops like OLPC, or maybe for low-end servers as a way of saving electricity.

Re:nothing to see here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945688)

What? How does any of that make sense? First of all I assume you mean either Gb or GB, because Mb (or MB) would be ridiculous. Secondly, how do hybrids help anything? All they do is give you all the problems of both technologies with the benefits of neither. There are numerous companies with planned releases of flash drives in the >100GB range for 2008. Your information is outdated and your logic is flawed.

Re:nothing to see here... (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945698)

Flash drives are going to be very handy for orgs like Google and Netflix, businesses that write once to the drive and don't change the data often (read up on the GFS/Google File System for further details). The drives will just sit there spitting out data quickly and use little power, while not needing to be replaced often due to the read-heavy nature of their use.

On the other hand, you wouldn't want to use the flash drives in a DB server that is write-heavy, and go through drives like Kleenex.

Re:nothing to see here... (4, Funny)

Not_Wiggins (686627) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945762)

The sweet spot right now seems to be around 16 or 32 Mb. You can get an 16 Mb flash drive for about $150, but 32 Mb is more than twice the price.

Can't... resist...

1999 called... they want their flash pricing back. ;)

Or, if you'd like, I'd be willing to sell you some 32Mb flash cards for, shall we say, $100 a piece? ;)

(Sorry.)

Re:nothing to see here... (3, Funny)

Slashcrap (869349) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945812)

no evidence that they actually have working hardware.

This is a good point and you are right to be cautious. Obviously there will be massive technological challenges to overcome in order to move past the current state of the art, which is loads of flash connected to an SATA interface, to this new paradigm of having shitloads of flash connected to an SATA interface.

I'm not an expert, but I'm thinking perhaps they can start by adding more flash?

Re:nothing to see here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21946112)

The sweet spot right now seems to be around 16 or 32 Mb. You can get an 16 Mb flash drive for about $150, but 32 Mb is more than twice the price.
What year are you living in?

I think Roy said it best... (1)

ninjamonkeypirate (1214588) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946266)

I'm sorry, are you from the past?

Will it run... (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945528)

Nice, but will it run Pen Drive Linux [pendrivelinux.com] ?

Servers? (3, Insightful)

jeremy128 (976915) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945550)

I would expect that a drive like this would be nice for servers (if cost was no consideration) because of the lack of moving parts, and lower heat production. I don't know for sure, but I would bet that these would take a lot less juice than a conventional hard drive. I wouldn't be surprised if they lasted longer, as well (no moving parts no wear down).
That said, I want a laptop with one of these.

Google should just (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945552)

buy NAND. Then we'll have more Google stories about big numbers to flood /. with!

Reading the fine print ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945672)

From their web site:

* Up to 64 GB at 8.5 mm height

So ... it's 2.5" wide and as tall as a shoebox. Nice.

Re:Reading the fine print ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945832)

8.5 mm is about 0.33 inches.

Re:Reading the fine print ... (0, Flamebait)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945858)

8.5 mm is about 1/3 inch. millimeters are 1/10 of centimeters (which are 1/100 of meters)

mod parent "stupid american"

Re:Reading the fine print ... (1)

wmshub (25291) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946084)

Cut him some slack. Maybe he just wears extremely tiny shoes.

New drive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#21945710)

Want! Want now! This is just what I need for the laptop.

832 Gigs (1)

RandoX (828285) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945716)

832 gigs should be enough for anyone.

the marketing dept has picked a name for it: (4, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945728)

The Porntropolis 832 (tm)

No potential customers yet either (1)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945806)

No pricing as of yet

No customers capable of affording it either.

I thought flash went bad over time (0, Troll)

alextheseal (653421) | more than 6 years ago | (#21945810)

I thought flash died after a limited number of state changes. Has this been solved while I slept or should we be expecting 2009 to be the year of data loss?

Re:I thought flash went bad over time (4, Informative)

LighterShadeOfBlack (1011407) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946056)

I swear at least one person has asked this question in every flash-drive related article on /. for the last 5 years. Yes, there is a limited number of writes - usually in the 100,000 to 1 million range depending on the quality of flash used. No, it isn't a problem in any practical terms for common uses. Using wear-levelling a flash drive should work out a great deal more durable than existing hard drive technology.

Re:I thought flash went bad over time (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946138)

It still has the 'problem' of limited writes, but the problem has been greatly reduced by load-leveling techniques and general improvements to the technology.

Often it is a combination of factors like having backup space (Sell a 120gig HD as a 100gig HD) and load leveling which makes sure that you aren't always writing to the same memory location.

So while it is still an issue, it has largely been addressed. I wouldn't use it on anything that is write-heavy, but for most situations you won't notice much of a difference.

where are holographic drives? (1)

zymano (581466) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946092)

Taking too long

Preinstalled? (2, Funny)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 6 years ago | (#21946172)

Does it come with a free copy of Duke Nukem Forever preinstalled?
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