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First Evidence Of Under-Ice Volcanoes In Antarctica

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the a-touch-extreme dept.

Science 186

An anonymous reader writes "The first evidence of a volcanic eruption from beneath Antarctica's ice sheet has been discovered by members of the British Antarctic Survey. The volcano on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet began erupting some 2,000 years ago and remains active to this day. Using airborne ice-sounding radar, scientists discovered a layer of ash produced by a 'subglacial' volcano. It extends across an area larger than Wales."

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And here (5, Funny)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124586)

everyone was blaming global warming for the melting of the icecaps...

Re:And here (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124600)

Personally, I thought it was the steaming tall mugs of Frosty Piss being dumped over there.
 

Re:And here (0, Redundant)

BlueParrot (965239) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124666)

everyone was blaming global warming for the melting of the icecaps...

And we still are, these volcano's would be heating the ice from bellow, the icecaps are melting at the surface, forming water pools in the ice.

Re:And here (2, Insightful)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124668)

"everyone was blaming global warming for the melting of the icecaps..."

...when really it was...what? - An Antartic volcano melting the Artic sea ice?

Re:And here (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125750)

"For every reaction there is an equal and opposite reaction"

God you science people don't even apply your own science.

You missed a part of TA. (3, Informative)

VON-MAN (621853) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124692)

it (the eruption) cannot explain the more widespread thinning of West Antarctic glaciers that together are contributing nearly 0.2mm per year to sea-level rise. This wider change most probably has its origin in warming ocean waters.

Re:You missed a part of TA. (1, Insightful)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124936)

i seriously have to call bullshit on someone claiming they can measure an ocean to 0.2mm

Re:You missed a part of TA. (4, Insightful)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124970)

i seriously have to call bullshit on someone claiming they can measure an ocean to 0.2mm

Yarr, it be an average, I'm sure you've heard of them. Oh yes, and 0.2mm is a pretty big number, rather easy to measure.

Re:You missed a part of TA. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125742)

[quote] Yarr, it be an average, I'm sure you've heard of them. Oh yes, and 0.2mm is a pretty big number, rather easy to measure. [/quote]

Yeah huge number, considering the surface tension of water itself is in the range
of .1 to .2 mm.

Re:You missed a part of TA. (1)

VON-MAN (621853) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125070)

Seriously, 0.2mm isn't really difficult to measure with 21th century technology. And (even as the article doesn't explicitly say this) i'm sure it's an average.

Re:You missed a part of TA. (2, Funny)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125908)

Extolling the virtues of 21th century technology has got to be up there as one of the most retarded things ever said on Slashdot.

Re: And here (1)

robert899 (769631) | more than 6 years ago | (#22126142)

My God Betty, you're right!

Larger than a whale? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124594)

Then that really is a mighty volcano! What next, a volcano with an area larger than 100 elephants?

Re:Larger than a whale? (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124754)

Aren't a lot of what lay people call a "volcano" typically larger then whales?

Re:Larger than a whale? (1)

Xest (935314) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124934)

Yes, but not as often larger than wales.

Re:Larger than a whale? (5, Funny)

0a100b (456593) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125036)

I'm not familiar with the Imperial system. Can somebody tell me how many Kazakhstans this volcano measures?

Re:Larger than a whale? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125352)

I'm pretty sure there are 15 Millihelens per Kazakhstan. Also, 2 Whales per Rosie O'Donnell.

Remember, when working with imperial units, it's important to keep this distinction in mind: a keg of beer is half a barrel, but not just any barrel.

Re:Larger than a whale? (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125134)

What next, a volcano with an area larger than 100 elephants?

That would be a pretty big volcano - remember, elephants are larger than the moon! [ytmnd.com]
(yes, I know it's a hoax, but it's still pretty funny)

Re:Larger than a whale? (1)

zombie_striptease (966467) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125234)

Not larger than a whale, larger than whales. All of them.

Re:Larger than a whale? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125402)

Ignoramus! That's "Wales", not "whales", the British Standard news-media unit of area that is quite a lot more than a "football pitch" and somewhere between "Greater London" and "Australia".

Re:Larger than a whale? (2, Funny)

stereoroid (234317) | more than 6 years ago | (#22126292)

Oh, like we didn't see that one coming... still, it's got some way to go before it's as big as Wales' head - Prince Charles of Wales, that is.

Volcanos elsewhere... (5, Funny)

psychicsword (1036852) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124604)

There are thousands of volcanoes elsewhere on the globe I don't see why antarctic would be any different. I understand before we never had any proof and that is why it is news but I wouldn't say it is Earth shaking news.

Re:Volcanos elsewhere... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124614)

And it does not run Linux!

Re:Volcanos elsewhere... (1, Redundant)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124644)

I wouldn't say it is Earth shaking news.
On the contrary, volcanoes are among the leading cause of earthquakes so I would contend this is precisely "earth shaking news"

Re:Volcanos elsewhere... (1)

psychicsword (1036852) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124660)

The pun was intended

Re:Volcanos elsewhere... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124676)

Hey, what's that? It smells like burning pants!

Re:Volcanos elsewhere... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124750)

This sounds like a job for emergency pants [sluggy.com] !

Re:Volcanos elsewhere... (1, Funny)

sqldr (838964) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124724)

I thought the primary cause of earth tremors was hoards of stampeding apple fans heading down to the apple shop to see the latest ipod/iphone/macbook.

How long? (2, Interesting)

neokushan (932374) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124606)

How long before people start claiming these as being the source of the melting ice caps?

Re:How long? (5, Funny)

jaxtherat (1165473) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124634)

Well, Monday January 21, @08:20PM according to the first post...

Re:How long? (0, Redundant)

Charcharodon (611187) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124798)

....hum let's see...the one area of ice caps that is showing massive amounts of melting, is sort right over the volcano......

...volcano under the ice...ice is melting...

...President Bush's fault!

Re:How long? (1, Offtopic)

ultranova (717540) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125100)

....hum let's see...the one area of ice caps that is showing massive amounts of melting, is sort right over the volcano......

And has been for 2000 years, according to the summary. Why would it only begin melting in modern times, if the volcano is the cause ?

...President Bush's fault!

Nah, but spreading lies - about climate change, about Iraq, and who knows what else - for personal gain sure is.

It's January and there isn't any snow on the ground; in fact it's raining water. It's been like this year after year lately. A decade ago it would be midwinter by now, with the temperature of -20 degree Celcius and snow covering everything in a beautiful white sheet. Instead we have endless rain and mud, year after year after year. And the monkey you call president has the gall to argue the change isn't real.

And Americans wonder why they are hated.

Re:How long? (3, Insightful)

Charcharodon (611187) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125434)

And has been for 2000 years, according to the summary. Why would it only begin melting in modern times, if the volcano is the cause ?

Yeah with all that data we have colected by scientists during the days of the Roman Empire makes it easy to see those long term ice melting trends.....

....oh wait that's right you are a git and you are talking out your arse.

Now for proper insults and arguments when you saying raining all the time, you haven't identified where you from. I'm assuming Europe. I've only spent a real amount of time in England, Norway, and Cyprus so my knowledge of weather is limited to those places.

England does nothing but piss rain and rarely ever gets cold enough for snow, so you can hardly blame that on the US.

Norwary rarely get's warm enough for anything but snow (I've only been there during the winter, froze my ass off.) so you can't be from there.

Cyprus was nice and warm, and if that is what the world is going to be like after global warming then let's go for a drive in my SUV to go buy stuff that has alot of plastic packaging.

The more I travel the more I realize that people are full of it, and can hardly lay all the worlds problems at the US's feet. I haven't seen anything in Europe that impresses me of your Green life style.

You don't have any better driving habits than in the US. The only reasons you drive less (as in distance not in frequency, is your sky high taxes, shitty roads, and that you are willing to live shoulder to shoulder in town with barely any parking, is the only reason you guys drive small cars.

Mild winters and summers also let's you off the hook for cooling and heating bills and the fact that you guys are willing to again be gouged by the utility companys. I can see why you use less. I'm still paying twice as much here in the UK (without AC) than I did while living in the California desert(with AC) which supposedly is supposed to be in the middle of a power crisis and having raised rates drastically in the last few years.

Now the only point I'll conceed to you is the war in Iraq is pretty much a waste of time. The money would have been better spent buying everyone Priuses and solar panels for their homes and a nice candygram telling the Middle East to go fuck their mothers.

Of course if we want to look at who has really caused all the problems in the Middle East and just about every other corner of the world all we have to do is take a look European history book. 400 years of European global policies and Empire building has made a real mess of things. The US has hardly had enough time to be blamed for much of it, but man does everyone scream bloody murder when we try to clean it up.

Re:How long? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125804)

which supposedly is supposed to be in the middle of a power crisis

The only crisis you're in is the Enron Business Model crisis, whereby you turn off your power plants for no reason except to convince everyone there's a crisis in order to extort more money from the end users.

Re:How long? (1)

Charcharodon (611187) | more than 6 years ago | (#22126034)

Yes I agree completely with that statement. The power companies, more like the power brokers have been playing a game for years in the US to keep prices up.

The truly sad thing is even with all the criminal behavior by the companies the prices are still a alot less in the States than I've found in the various places in Europe I've lived. In the States they have to be sneaky to rip us off, in Europe it's written right into the government regulations to rip people off.

I'm looking forward to heading back to the US when my time is up and putting solar and wind up at the house and start getting a check in the mail from the power company instead of a bill.

P

Re:How long? (1)

dasunt (249686) | more than 6 years ago | (#22126148)

And has been for 2000 years, according to the summary.

And it erupted in 325BC, according to the article.

I dunno about global warming, but I suspect that time traveling volcanoes will be a bigger problem. :p

(Oh, and kudos to the editor or writer who (presumably) dropped the "more than" before "2000 years". Without your sloppy skills, the previous joke would not be possible.)

Under-ice niggers found (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124608)

sacrificing under-ice virgins to it.

Vote Ron Paul, friends.

Oh well, screw global warming (4, Interesting)

Xiph (723935) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124620)

If volcanic activity is truly sending the glaciers into the ocean, local warming can have a real and serious effect on global climate.
It's funny, Here in Denmark, we here alot about the potential consequences of global warming, about the millions of refugees it will create.
Noone ever mentions that we'll probably be some of those refugees, Our tallest hill, has a height below 170,9 metres, or 560,6 feet above sealevel.

Time for me to buy that land in south america.

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124672)

or build an ark.. out of gopher wood...

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124680)

Can you survive a 1 m rise? Yes? Then you are good to go. Al Gore was full of shit when he mentioned 6 or 7 m.

This doesn't mean that life isn't going to suck in Denmark. But at least you won't be completely swamped. When people talk about refugees they primarily mean due to desertification. The increased desertification won't extend that far north, but it is going to make life at equatorial latitudes suck even more than it does now. Heh, we might finally actually have the torrid clime. Wouldn't the Greeks and Romans be surprised that it was humans that created it.

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (3, Informative)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124822)

Even a 1M rise is not good news for Denmark see map [firetree.net] , or many places in the USA like New orleans or even Sacramento [firetree.net] .

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (1)

PHPfanboy (841183) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124844)

Yo, we'll look after your women if you need!
We loves those Danish girls, oh yeah.

i read somewhere (2, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124850)

that scandinavia is still rebounding from the loss of its ice sheet in the last ice age

i don't know the rate, but perhaps the rising seawater and the rising land should counteract each other in scandinavia

i'm not really being that serious, just trying to bring some good cheer to you gloomy nords ;-)

Re:i read somewhere (1)

The Wannabe King (745989) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124906)

Eastern Norway and Northern Sweden, yes. But not Denmark. Denmark is actually sinking slightly.

then it's time for the danish to stop (2, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124954)

considering themselves scandinavian, and start considering themselves dutch

Re:then it's time for the danish to stop (0, Troll)

jackpot777 (1159971) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125620)

dutch


Really? So they shouldn't consider themselves Danes then? Because they usually do.

And what about the people from Holland that actually call themselves Nederlanders (but the English-speaking world calls them Dutch)?

And what about the German descendents in Pennsylvania that called themselves Deutsch, but the Americans call them Dutch because they never thought words could be different in different languages. To the point where Arnie, an Austrian, gets to play a character called Dutch in the movie Predator.

In summary: Denmark is that bit that juts up to the north of Germany and has islands that stretch to Sweden. The Dutch live in the Netherlands, just north of Belgium and due east of East Anglia in England.

Re:i read somewhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124966)

Only in northern scandinavia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_High_Coast).

Southern sweden (and presumably denmark) is actually sinking.

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125146)

We are only some oil digging mountain monkeys (fjallaper), but we do have a lot of mountainous areas to share with out strange sounding neighbors. But please try to speak in a way that makes it possible to understand you without being drunk!

"Test: Er du en fjellape?" - http://www.dinside.no/php/art.php?id=23174 [dinside.no]

But to be serious: The weather changes is serious. Norway have a long coastline with rough weather conditions. We might get serious problems, but we might deserve it. Might be time to find a quite area in the mountains and rethink the oil strategy. You are welcome to join.

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (1)

DougWebb (178910) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125280)

I wouldn't worry too much; another poster posted a quote that the sea level is rising 0.2mm/year. At that rate, your tallest hill has 850 thousand years before it'll go under.

Two scenarios are more likely: one is that Denmark will become more temperate, with less brutal winters. The other is that the Gulf Stream will be interrupted, there won't be any more warn water sent up into the northern Atlantic, and Denmark will become the southern end of a new glacier/ice cap.

Either way, you'll keep your head above water.

Re:Oh well, screw global warming (1)

jackpot777 (1159971) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125678)

I wouldn't worry too much; another poster posted a quote that the sea level is rising 0.2mm/year.


Nope, TFA said this was CONTRIBUTING a fifth of a centimetre to the rise in sea levels.

If I give five quid / Euros / dollars to a charity, that doesn't mean the charity has ONLY received five whatevers.

Do you all see?

For a technical-based forum, we certainly have a lot of people moving their fingers in tune to their beliefs before engaging brain first.

Why South America? (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125776)

My family very sensibly left Denmark sometime around the 1060s - probably having had to look at one hardwood chair design too many - and settled in the UK. My suggestion is that being a refugee is perfectly OK provided you have a few fast and well armed ships, and politically incorrect attitudes to the people you come to visit. Worked for us and, based on subsequent Danish and British history, can work for you too. Alternatively, imitate the Dutch and build concrete houseboats for the flat, low lying bits.

And the debate continues (2, Interesting)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124622)

Okay, probably not a good thing to post so frequently BUT...

From TFA:

Co-author Professor David Vaughan (BAS) says,"This eruption occurred close to Pine Island Glacier on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The flow of this glacier towards the coast has speeded up in recent decades and it may be possible that heat from the volcano has caused some of that acceleration. However, it cannot explain the more widespread thinning of West Antarctic glaciers that together are contributing nearly 0.2mm per year to sea-level rise. This wider change most probably has its origin in warming ocean waters."

What warms the oceans? Global warming is a big buzzword today, and not without merit. I just find it interesting that there may be more possibilities out there than just "OMG we are killing the urf!"

Nature has a role to play in this too, humans weren't around during the ice-age, if we were we would have been blamed for Global Cooling I bet...

Re:And the debate continues (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124638)

You RTFA, you must be new here, please do not do it again ...

Re:And the debate continues (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124898)

But if I don't rtfa everybody calls me proby and I have to clean out the trash!

Re:And the debate continues (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125292)

>humans weren't around during the ice-age, if we were we would have been blamed for Global Cooling I bet...

Um, yes we were. The last Ice Age ended around 10,000 years ago, while modern humans have been on the planet at least 100,000 years (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_sapiens#Rise_of_civilization/ [wikipedia.org] .

Re:And the debate continues (0, Flamebait)

jackpot777 (1159971) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125836)

I just find it interesting that there may be more possibilities out there than just "OMG we are killing the urf!"


Time to dispel a big myth, then.

The present concern with climate change ISN'T that it's happening (even though American commentator Rush Limbaugh wrote a book that says "Despite the hysterics of a few pseudo-scientists, there is no reason to believe in global warming", fogging the debate). It's happening. It's measured. It's science, bitches, deal with it.

The present concern is that it's happening faster than ever recorded in history.

Someone has already tried to fog the issue by stating that the Romans weren't taking meteorological measurements ...but they were, anecdotally. Diaries that stated when crops grew and what kinds of plants grew in their Empire. And the Romans weren't the only ones. The Ancient Greeks did it, the Chinese did it. Using this informaton, with a little common sense (a fir tree will thrive where an orange tree won't, for example), we know what the state of a part of the Earth was like, on a particular day.

Then there are ice cores. We have the technology to drill down into metres of ice and recover long cylinders of ice. Trapped in that ice are millions of air bubbles, showing us the make-up of the atmosphere and sometimes trapping plant spores, back before anyone was measuring these things. Tiny little time-capsules of proof. And all we have to do is study them.

Either that, or we can base our world-view on the writings of goat-herders in the desert. Personally, I'll put my money on people that know (for example) that the female body contains microscopic eggs over people writing poems on papyrus that thought the womb was just a fertile ground for a man's seed. But that's just me, call me rational if you like.

Wales are not fish! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124626)

My little sister is so stupid she thinks Wales are fish. Duh, Wales are mammals.

Re:Wales are not fish! (1)

Sciryl Llort (1160727) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124698)

Are too, I heard it at a rugby match:

Wales, Wales! [alansim.com]
Bloody great fishes are Wales.
They swim in the sea,
Till you eat them for tea,
O bloody great fishes are Wales.

Re:Wales are not fish! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124852)

It's spelled mamel, dummy.

Re:Wales are not fish! (1)

scoot80 (1017822) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124948)

mammal dum dum

Woosh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125082)

sound of joke going over your head etc.

Re:Wales are not fish! (4, Funny)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124856)

Actually, whales are mammals. Wales is a rugged, Klingon-speaking country in the United Kingdom.

Just the man I'm looking for (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125158)

I always wondered how to say "sheep and dirt" in Klingon.

Re:Wales are not fish! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125220)

Don't you mean United Klingdom?

Re:Wales are not fish! (1)

aproposofwhat (1019098) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125820)

Twll dy din.

Not Klingon, but Welsh.

"Alien" life? (3, Insightful)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124632)

One of the possibilities that this opens is that there is life that has been evolving separately from the rest of terrestrial life for millions of years. In theory life could live off the volcanic chemicals just as it does at undersea vents. This could be the really interesting part of the discovery.

Re:"Alien" life? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124682)

The idea that life forms that evolved separately from the majority of life on earth might exist in extreme environments has been around for some time now, and a great deal of research has been going on in Antarctica, especially right now during the latest International Polar Year. There has also been talk about the Russians finally drilling into Lake Vostok this year to see if there is life there. According to a lecturer at McMurdo this past October, microbial life has even been confirmed living in the ice itself - or, rather, perhaps in microscopic cracks in the ice. Some of these one-celled organisms apparently take as long as 20 years to undergo cell division - as opposed to 20 minutes for normal cells in warmer climates.

Altogether, lots of neat stuff happening this year on the ice.

Re:"Alien" life? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125120)

The idea that life forms that evolved separately from the majority of life on earth might exist in extreme environments has been around for some time now
You mean like these? [wikipedia.org] In which case I for one welcome our new, fivefold symmetric, barrel shaped overlords.

It's more than a possibility. (2, Informative)

VON-MAN (621853) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124746)

"Lakes Found Under Antarctic Ice Using Space Lasers"
http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/02/19/1319228&from=rss [slashdot.org]
"Exploration of lake hidden beneath Antarctica's ice sheet begins"
http://www.physorg.com/news119682885.html [physorg.com]

Re:It's more than a possibility. (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124832)

"Lakes Found Under Antarctic Ice Using Space Lasers" http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/02/19/1319228&from=rss [slashdot.org]
Wow. I knew we've sent monkeys and dogs into space, but...sharks in the space program? Isn't that dangerous? What if they bite the astronauts?

Wales (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124674)

Wales is that lump of land attached to the the left hand side of England - not the bottom pointy one, the lump above it and no not that island floating in the sea, that's Ireland.

They're not talking about the large underwater animal spelt "whale".

Wales, schmails (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124688)

Why's Wales always used as a random country for the purposes of size comparison? I sense a thesis coming on.

Re:Wales, schmails (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124768)

Why's Wales always used as a random country for the purposes of size comparison?

Because it confuses the hell out of Americans, who refer to the whole island as "England".

Re:Wales, schmails (1)

El Yanqui (1111145) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125008)

Because it confuses the hell out of Americans, who refer to the whole island as "England".

Is "England" that bit to the right of Isle of Man?

Re:Wales, schmails (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125778)

Exactly. And it is approximately 6000 Monacos big.

Re:Wales, schmails (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125674)

Because it confuses the hell out of Americans, who refer to the whole island as "Ingerlund".

There, fixed that for you.
 

Area conversion... (4, Funny)

Bazman (4849) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124720)

For those on the other side of the pond, the area of Wales is about that of New Jersey.

Actually, given that they've located an area of possibly steaming ash and dust, maybe they just found New Jersey by accident.

Re:Area conversion... (0, Troll)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124794)

I know Americans are bad at geography, but Antarctica isn't anywhere near New Jersey. FYI.

Re:Area conversion... (2, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124812)

As volcanoes go, this rather large. I am reminded of the bit in Blue Mars [wikipedia.org] where the west Antarctic ice sheet slides off the continent in a few days and global sea levels rise by six metres.

re: Blue Mars (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22124882)

Yeah, that was exactly my thought when I heard about this. It's even in the same frikkin' part of Antarctica!

Ah, well. At least my house is 30m above sea level...

Re:Area conversion... (1)

ArwynH (883499) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124964)

How large is than in Libraries of Congress?

Re:Area conversion... (2, Funny)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125362)

Do you mean to say that this volcano is spewing sheep?

Bond. (1)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124834)

must be me, but my first thought was "wow! what a splendid Bond villain hideout that would make!"

ice on, lava below, inaccessible - threat of global destruction by melting the ice caps. now I just need several hundred minions wearing identical surplus overalls and large corridors I can drive my C5s, Mini Mokes and of course the G-Whiz down. Better order a brace of those new TATA mini cars to get with modern times and all the ladies have to wear mini skirts. Damn, better get back to work. :-)

Re:Bond. (1)

Oktober Sunset (838224) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124918)

Don't forget to order black face visors for all your minions too.

Google Maps (1)

hagnat (752654) | more than 6 years ago | (#22124920)

there was nothing strange in the coordinates provided in the article, but i found this dark spot nearby [google.com] . Is this the 'evidence' ?

Re:Google Maps (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125122)

No. That's the wreckage of Anubis' ship.

Re:Google Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125472)

Actually that's Morgon Freeman waving his hands yelling "Get me out of here!!!"

Hello you slashdot bastards (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125018)

niggers with wheels

you mod-em-down you fed them.

Europa? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125058)

I remember hearing stuff to suggest the ice on europa was miles thick, but if there's anything alive down there might it support the old Hypthesis?

I th4nk you For your time (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125078)

and building is again. There are 'doin6 something' clear she couldn't its readers and If *BSD is to

will accelerate melting at some point (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125142)

This is very bad news (tm).

There is a quite thick layer of soot and ash trapped inside the glacier. At some point when the glacier melts enough, that whole layer becomes visible and thus the reflection of sunlight from the glacier surface diminishes. And the melting speed increases dramatically. To make things worse, the layer will stay there for some time as it is bit warmer than the ice and so it bores small holes where to stay put instead of getting flushed away.

And don't get me started on that active volcano under glacier. How it will react when the weight of the glacier eases rapidly? Possible earthquakes and that means tsunami.

Funny thing, a Finnish author named Risto Isomäki has written a hard scifi book about the subject only couple of years ago. It's called the sands of Sarasvati.

Re:will accelerate melting at some point (1)

Sqweegee (968985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22126270)

"And don't get me started on that active volcano under glacier. How it will react when the weight of the glacier eases rapidly? Possible earthquakes and that means tsunami." Earthquakes taking place thousands of miles from anyone except maybe an antarctic exploration camp aren't much of a threat, and tsunami are usually not a problem in mountain ranges on land.

Wales, as a common unit of size!!! (3, Interesting)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125378)

From http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A1066484 [bbc.co.uk]

Wales has, for decades, been used in the UK as a standard of measurement, not just of land mass but also of population, annual rain fall, tourist numbers and exports. Every large country's size was measured in 'Wales'es. Popular media, like radio and television have used the 'Wales', mainly in news reports.

        "The Americans have invaded Vietnam. This country in south east Asia is 14 times the size of Wales."

        "The Falklands have been invaded! These disputed islands, half the size of Wales, have been sought after by the Argentine government for decades."

etc

Re:Wales, as a common unit of size!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125414)

Well it has to be useful for something, right?

Re:Wales, as a common unit of size!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22126304)

Finally, as an American I get to laugh at someone else's units.

Wales? (1)

Whiteox (919863) | more than 6 years ago | (#22125412)

You mean the country of Wales in the UK?
That's a weird kind of comparison!
But I suppose it's better than World Book Encyclopedia (1967) that kept comparing area to US States. And height comparisons to how many Empire State buildings etc etc.

What's with the Otter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22125944)

Would it kill them to show an image of the radar scan, or do they think we're too stupid to understand it? If they're so damn afraid of losing the credit they should just shut up until that's assured and then go public.

Corporate-ized scientists, sheesh...

On Wales: (1)

ringmaster_j (760218) | more than 6 years ago | (#22126136)

A plume of ash covered in a thick layer of ice the size of Wales seems slightly more interesting than Wales itself.
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