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Some People Just Never Learn

Zonk posted more than 5 years ago | from the i-could-use-a-dose-of-anti-a1 dept.

Biotech 327

Iddo Genuth writes "German scientists recently showed what many of us suspected but could not prove — some people just don't learn. The German researchers have found a genetic factor that affects our ability to learn from our errors. The scientists demonstrated that men carrying the A1 mutation are less successful at learning to avoid mistakes than men who do not carry this genetic mutation. This finding has the potential to improve our understanding of the causes of addictive and compulsive behaviors."

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327 comments

Yes (5, Funny)

superid (46543) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175100)

I call them "co workers"

Re:Yes (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175136)

Lucky you. I call people like this 'boss'

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175146)

I call them "slashdot editors."

I look forward to making this same comment on the inevitable dupe that should be arriving in the next few days.

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175604)

Err, this article IS a dupe.

Re:Yes (0, Redundant)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175300)

So do your "co workers"

Re:Yes (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175406)

So do your "co workers"
You do realize that a valid sentence must contain a verb, right? This must mean "do" is the verb. Ewww.

I call them me (5, Interesting)

selfdiscipline (317559) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175414)

I was diagnosed with some sort of generic learning disability when I was a teen.

I tend to bang my brain against new concepts again and again, until I finally understand them in big chunks. I tend to overlook the obvious, and go for the bizarre interpretations of things.

So I often find myself in situations where I feel stupid for not grasping something that is readily apparent to most everyone else, but at the same time I've been successful with teaching myself certain concepts other people wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole.

For instance, I've taught myself how to program in Haskell, whereas most programmers run screaming from anything with more than a minimal functional paradigm component. It did take me quite a while to get some concepts in Haskell, though.

Re:I call them me (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175494)

Good on you for learning to live with your learning disability and making something of your life.

My wife didn't learn to read properly until she was about 15 or 16. Now she's a very good primary school teacher. She's dyslexic and had spent a lot of time denying the problem and fooling her teachers (though that had something to do with a terrible education system). Since this is mostly her personal info I'm posting anon.

Re:I call them me (0, Offtopic)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175502)

most programmers run screaming from anything with more than a minimal functional paradigm
Yes. The Nomads hit me right in the dyslexia with their arrows before (s)currying off.

Re:I call them me (1)

no1nose (993082) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175662)

Ditto for me. It takes me longer than most people to learn things. However, it seems like once I get "it", I really get it and gain a good working knowledge whatever it is I am trying to learn.

Re:I call them me (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175694)

Haskell is nice. We used a variant (Gofer) for the first-semester CS introduction. Some students never even realized they were programming ;-)

Re:I call them me (5, Insightful)

DaedalusHKX (660194) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175726)

That's what I find peculiar. As soon as they "discover" that the old adage "not everyone is wired the same way", they immediately declare these people "damaged" or "worthless". Such is the fate of those who entrust their families to the cookie cutter society... they get a cookie cutter family, and if it doesn't fit the mold, its declared "defective."

Case in point, you have certain so called "flaws", but also talents in other areas. Every last one of us does, but most keep trying to fit the idiotic mold of society, that they miss out on where their talents would be best placed. Whether you blame genes, parental upbringing, childhood experiences or chemicals in your diet, the pedigree means far less than what is done with it.

I congratulate you on benefitting from your strongpoints, and not letting your weaker points take you down. There truly is little reason to let the crooks and liars shape your life. Ten years from now they will once again discover that the research in a certain direction was paid by certain people. Live your life, enjoy it, and let the crooks sell to other suckers. :)

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175640)

Is this like how every couple of hours I visit slashdot, and leave none the wiser with my boss yelling at me?

Re:Yes (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175754)

  1. You haven't been to this site in weeks, but some amount of temporal confusion is to be expected from the medication.
  2. That's not your boss.
  3. Your usage of the head-mounted pointer for typing is commendable, and exceeds the skill of most /.ers for spelling and punctuation use.
  4. The "I love me" jacket is starting to look loose due to the weight loss. Here, let me *tighten* that up for you.
  5. Welcome to the Church of Appliantology, you Latent Appliance Fetishist.

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175664)

I call them "cow orkers"

That's nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175690)

I call them "Microsoft Windows users".

Explains my morning commute (2, Funny)

mackil (668039) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175112)

Well this explains my entire morning commute right here. The same people making the same mistakes every week. At long last we have a scientific explanation.

Re:Explains my morning commute (1)

Secret Rabbit (914973) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175268)

Or they could just be sleepy. People aren't really capable of learning and get (more) clumsy when they are tired.

Between the two explanations, which one's more likely?

So that explains... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175114)

...all those people who voted for Bush the second time.

Re:So that explains... (4, Funny)

fireman sam (662213) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175528)

don't you mean "all of those voting machines that voted for Bush".

FiremanSam - now flame proof.

Re:So that explains... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175626)

No, that explains all those people who are really surprised at how the Clintons are savaging Obama.

Woo. Big fucking surprise.

Gee, do you really think it was a coincidence that politics in the US got really nasty around 1992? And do you really still think it's all Karl Rove's fault?

"Politics of personal destruction" indeed. And the Clintons are the source. If you can't see that, well, this entire thread is about YOU.

Yes (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175132)

but the technical name for them is "Bush supporters"

What does this have to do with OCD? (2, Insightful)

blackpaw (240313) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175142)

"This finding has the potential to improve our understanding of the causes of addictive and compulsive behaviors."

"stubbornness" or inability to learn from mistakes has zero to nothing to do with compulsive disorders. I notice the source paper makes no mention of cumpulsive behaviours. Probably just another crap journo writeup of something he/she didn't understand and they pulled some bogus connection out of their ass.

Re:What does this have to do with OCD? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175234)

they pulled some bogus connection out of their ass.
Hey, that's a trade secret!

Re:What does this have to do with OCD? (2, Interesting)

farkus888 (1103903) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175244)

I agree. I know I will be called out on anecdotal data here but I have known more than one person with alcohol problems or who are smokers who are actually quite bright. everyone knows of the archetypal substance abusing tortured genius. I'm not saying that alcoholism is a sign of intelligence but rather that it is a poor indicator of stupidity, in this case shown through repetitive poor decisions.

Re:What does this have to do with OCD? (1)

MacarooMac (1222684) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175280)

"stubbornness" or inability to learn from mistakes has zero to nothing to do with compulsive disorders.
Ah, but if someone is addicted to being stubborn then behaving obsessively might become complusive. This could end in disorder[ly] conduct.

Re:What does this have to do with OCD? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175368)

you are confusing compulsive disorders with compulsive behaviors. there is a distinct difference. everybody exhibits compulsive behaviors from time to time (do you check slashdot 10 times a day? do you feel the need to go to the gym daily? when you see the red button do you press it?), its when these behaviors become obsessive (as in OCD) that they are classified as a disorder.

Re:What does this have to do with OCD? (4, Informative)

Sique (173459) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175480)

If you not just read TFA, but actually followed the links you would have been at Science [sciencemag.org] , where the abstract clearly states:

Dopamine D2 receptor reduction seems to decrease sensitivity to negative action consequences, which may explain an increased risk of developing addictive behaviors in A1-allele carriers.
Maybe this time the journalist was better at actually reading and understanding the article?

plus some definition problems (5, Insightful)

Quadraginta (902985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175534)

It's also unclear whether the behaviour is properly labeled. "Learn from your mistakes" is a phrase that assumes your choice and its consequences are clear: do this or do that, and if "this" leads to bad consequences, why, you need to "learn from your mistake" and do "that" instead.

But real life is not nearly so simple. First, there are many cases where people don't see all the choices, or even any choice. You can't be guilty of failing to learn from your mistakes if you're not even aware of the alternate choices you could be making.

Second, it's only in fairly restricted cases that a perfectly clear connection can be drawn from choice to consequences. If you try to beat the train at the RR crossing and get creamed, well, that one's easy. But what if you take a job at X corporation and are then unhappy five years later? Is it really the job, or is it the crappy marriage that you contracted, too? More importantly, how do you really know that if you'd not taken a job at X corporation, you'd be happier? Maybe things would be even worse! Real-life choices are usually befogged by the difficulty of being sure of the connection between choice and consequences, and by the difficulty of accurately guessing what the consequences of alternate choices might have been.

Finally, there is sufficient statistical noise in many choices that sometimes the best decision is not to "learn from your mistakes." We call that "persistence" and give great credit to people who display it, when their continued "failure" to learn from their mistakes eventually pays off. The guy who starts business after business, each failing, until he finally hits on the one that pays off. The athlete who comes in 2nd and 3rd, time after time, until eventually he wins. We can go back and, with 20/20 hindsight, argue that he did "learn from his mistakes" in that he didn't do the same thing in exactly the same way again. But it's still the case that on the topmost issue, the main choice, he "failed to learn from his mistakes" by deliberately choosing to do again and again something at which he failed again and again. Until one day, he didn't.

For all these reasons, I think the definition of what it means to "learn from your mistakes" in real life (as opposed to the narrow world of the academic psych lab) is pretty problematic.

Of all races.. (2, Insightful)

wimmi (263136) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175186)

It had to be Germans to establish scientific proof of eugenetics.. :-(

Re:Of all races.. (5, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175420)

Well, while the notion that Germany (thanks to its association with Adolf Hitler) is somehow prone to being considered 'racist' is really wasted brain bandwidth. For thousands of years people have hated the Jews for various reasons, both correct and incorrect, founded and unfounded, stupid and otherwise. The reality of "antisemitism" (consider the fact that the word even EXISTS... is there a similar word for hating other ethnic or social groups?! There might be, but I can't think of any) is that it's a sentiment that goes beyond any borders, nationality or social background. The Jews were driven from the middle east because people didn't like them. (Don't need to go into why) They were spread across Europe and continued into their essentially forced move and migrations across the planet largely because anywhere they went, people didn't like them. Again, the reasons why are irrelevant in reporting the reality of the reasons why Jews were no longer in Israel and Israel ceased to exist for a very long time.

I guess I'm drifting away from my point here so to bring it back, I'm just saying that Germans hold no monopoly over hating Jews. There are LOTS of people who had done horrible things to them in the past.

Re:Of all races.. (2, Interesting)

besya (154228) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175746)

It is amazing how a person while defending a nation from being stereotyped against can none the less demonstrate the same prejudice as the original poster. I agree that we can't say that all Germans were at fault for what happened to the Jews. Can you please elaborate on the good and valid reasons that can or could exist to hate every single member of the nation, in your post you are saying there were. The fact that Jews through out the history where hated is not a good defense of what happened in Germany. This whole discussion is irrelevant to this post in any case, the original post was irrelevant your reply was as bad and frankly mine is no better, I just can't stand someone jumping in to defend against stereotyping while committing the same offense.

Re:Of all races.. (4, Interesting)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175678)

For those that are going to call Goodwin's Law, look up eugenetics. Many US states practiced it up until around the time of WW2 (some states even did it later). Sterilizing prisoners, people they decided were mentally ill, etc. Some really, scary and depressing cases. Sure, it wasn't necessarily race based, but definitely the same idea that a certain European country had.. In fact, they claimed they got the idea from California.

Re:Of all races.. (2, Insightful)

quax (19371) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175752)

Of all places I guess it had to be /. to find somebody confusing race with nationality.

If A1 is still found today... (3, Interesting)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175188)

...doesn't it mean it has some evolutionary advantages?

Re:If A1 is still found today... (1)

Traxxas (20074) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175242)

In positive outcome situations stubbornness is often renamed to willpower.

Re:If A1 is still found today... (4, Insightful)

kungfoofairy (992473) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175292)

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Are people with this mutation better able to persist at a certain task until they find a way to complete it or discover an answer, failed previous attempts be damned?

Re:If A1 is still found today... (3, Informative)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175382)

Not sure. If it doesn't disadvantage people (i.e. lead to higher chance of death) then it's quite possible that A1 would just stick around (genes don't just disappear for no reason).

Re:If A1 is still found today... (5, Funny)

nut (19435) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175484)

> ...doesn't it mean it has some evolutionary advantages?

Yes.

"Will you go out with me Saturday night?"

"I wouldn't go out with you on Saturday if you paid me $1 million."

"What are you doing next weekend then?"

Persistence in the face of negative feedback sometimes is a winning strategy.

Re:If A1 is still found today... (1)

spicate (667270) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175500)

Your "mistakes" aren't always your fault. Persistence in the face of failure or rejection might have some benefit for survival... or for reproduction!

Re:If A1 is still found today... (1)

clem (5683) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175526)

I suppose the flip side of the trait is the tenacity to "get back up on the horse". Initial consequences can easily sway some into thinking that they've made a mistake when really they just needed to try again when conditions where better. If someone gives up too early in this case they will never meet with success.

Not really. It could be vestigial (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175546)

However, I'm pretty sure stubborness can be considered both an asset and a liability. Some brick walls you might break through if you hit your head on them enough. Others will just give you a concussion.

There are certainly plenty of cases where an A1-carrying mutant...err...strong-willed person will beat out an out-of-the-box thinker.

Re:If A1 is still found today... (1)

krakround (1065064) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175568)

It may mean that A1 is entwined with other genes that provide actual benefit. Why does homosexuality have a genetic component?

Re:If A1 is still found today... (1)

fontkick (788075) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175672)

It could be part of the genetic code that increases risk taking or increases repetitive behavior in spite of the penalties associated with said behavior. Both of which can be useful to survival - mating, fighting and hunting involve both risk and repetition of dangerous behavior.

I'm wondering when it's going to dawn on the general public that a person is basically one big chemical reaction. If it were assumed that our behavior arises from our chemical nature (teenage hormones, anyone?) then maybe there would be some progress in how the justice system deals with offenders and how the educational system teaches students.

Re:If A1 is still found today... (1)

eepok (545733) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175716)

Well, "evolutionary advantage" can mean one of two things in this situation:

1) The trait's been passed on generation to generation because men are less likely to learn from is that "sex may produce unwanted offspring."
2) The trait benefits the species in the long run.

I believe the appropriate interpretation in the this case in (1).

Re: No (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175756)

Just because some trait exists or still exists doesnt mean that it has evolutionary advantages. It could mean that the mutation hasnt been around long enough for evolutionary preasures to take place. It could mean that the trait doesnt have any advantages but also doesnt have any disadvantages. It could mean that the disadvantages arent significant enough to prevent the organism from producing offspring.

Error in the summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175224)

This finding has the potential to encourage genetic prejudice based on the causes of addictive and compulsive behaviors

Fixed it for you. Gattaca here we come!

Interesting stuff (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175232)

Just think of the relevance for politics, religion, almost everything...
I'm curious what the probability for that allele is in the general population.

More of a reason to require a parenting licence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175248)

Reproduction should not be a universal right.

Make it viral (1)

the_kanzure (1100087) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175266)

Think about it, a single gene. Go to protocols-online, grab a few documents pertaining to viral gene therapy, encode the correct gene that you want to modify, and let's do viral intelligence enhancement. Granted, this is Slashdot, so the virus will have to be transported at first via needle and vile instead of sex, but whatever.

SLOW DOWN, mate! Think of the consequences... (2, Funny)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175544)

If that strategy works, you're talking about bankrupting Taco Bell and the death of the Republican party.

Battle of the sexes strikes again (1)

Zaphod The 42nd (1205578) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175274)

When they say "men" who have this mutation are slower to react, do they mean men as in humans or men as in males? If they mean the latter, what makes women immune to this mutation? I definately do NOT need another supposed scientific reason to make all women think that they are correct when in fact they are very wrong, and make them all convinced they are masters of multi-tasking and males are simple minded. All stereotypes have their exceptions! All of you women need to learn this!

study subjects, not generality (1)

GoddessOfDeath (887416) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175394)

My guess (I didn't RTFA) is that they did the study in male volunteers, and thus can't comment on females. It has nothing to do with differences between the sexes.

Re:Battle of the sexes strikes again (1)

Bongo Bill (853669) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175440)

According to the article, all twenty-six of the test subjects were male, and half had this particular gene.

Re:Battle of the sexes strikes again (1)

rjhubs (929158) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175442)

I take it you are an A1 carrier. Most of us have quickly learned, arguing with women gets you no where and should be avoided at all costs. There are better ways to get what one wants.

Every (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175284)

reply should be modded redundant to celebrate.

First Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175286)

First Post!

Dopamine (2, Interesting)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175326)

I wonder if this implies that medication that affects dopamine levels reduces (or increases) a persons failure to learn from mistakes.

Not guilty your Honor... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#22175352)

I plead not guilty by reason of genetics.

Oblig. Simpsons Quote (4, Funny)

_Hellfire_ (170113) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175364)

Chain Gang Sheriff: (whips Homer) "No listening! You hear me?"

Homer: "Um.... n... no?"

Chain Gang Sheriff: "You just don't learn do ya?"

Just wait till the general public get hold of this (3, Interesting)

Secret Rabbit (914973) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175408)

Then they'll brainwash there kids into thinking they have a genetic disorder that prevents them from learning (educators will propagate this as well). Then the activists will get involved and say that poor grades are discriminatory against something that these people have no control over. Then...

Re:Just wait till the general public get hold of t (1)

SomeJoel (1061138) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175492)

Yep, it's all fun and games until someone thinks of the children.

Dumbass gene (1)

moankey (142715) | more than 5 years ago | (#22175452)

Of course it would be the Germans to discover that there is a Dummkopf gene.

Reminds me of our math teacher that would say "Dummkopf" if you gave the wrong answer.

Re:Dumbass gene (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175674)

Not quite. That would be a dumbhead gene.

What they actually discovered is the "Dummesel" gene.

As in, "Du bist ein gross dummesel."

This concludes your German insult lesson for the day. Don't forget, next week we will be having a quiz on "Ihre mutter" jokes.

Obligatory german/austrian comment (5, Funny)

bcg (322392) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175530)

So perhaps they won't invade Poland a third time?

HTH

Learn1 Learn2 != Learn = 0 (4, Interesting)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175562)

Just because some people have a harder time learning does not mean they can't learn.

It's just harder.

Seriously, it doesn't mean they don't learn (the title of this /. post), it means they have a lower capability.

It's like saying that Americans can't speak more than two languages. Most have never tried, nor had the easy resources to do so, but they could probably learn additional languages, even if it might be harder here.

Re:Learn1 Learn2 != Learn = 0 (1)

adisakp (705706) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175628)

It's like saying that Americans can't speak more than two languages.

I think the general assumption around the world is that Americans can't speak MORE than *ONE* language and most of them don't even speak the one very well. That's certainly the image our current president propagates to the rest of the planet.

Re:Learn1 Learn2 != Learn = 0 (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175740)

I think the general assumption around the world is that Americans can't speak MORE than *ONE* language and most of them don't even speak the one very well. That's certainly the image our current president propagates to the rest of the planet.

I can confirm that.

Seriously, we know there are some pretty smart people in the US. What we cannot figure out is why they are not leaving.

Re:Learn1 Learn2 != Learn = 0 (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175782)

Seriously, we know there are some pretty smart people in the US. What we cannot figure out is why they are not leaving.

Well, our L1 and L2 visas haven't expired yet.

I for one welcome... (0, Redundant)

monopole (44023) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175586)

...our new A1 mutant overlords.
Well they took power 7 years ago, but better late than never!

Is this even a deficiency? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22175588)

I see previous comments insinuate as much, but to choose a topical example, explorers such as Sir Edmund Hillary must have known that their efforts were both dangerous, and likely to fail. Repeated previous attempts had been unsuccessful (negative feedback) and so why bother trying (again)? Presumably because the rewards of success outweighed the risks of failure.

Evolution evidently agrees, otherwise how would this mutation have become so widespread?

I must have this gene (1)

nido (102070) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175622)

from the article:

Some people do not give up even when they do not succeed. They refuse to accept defeat and continue to try even when common sense tells others there's no use in trying.
Stubbornness is a trait of successful people. What's the story about all the trials Edison went through to successfully make his first lightbulb?

For example, I still can't read Harry Potter [slashdot.org] . If I were to accept the covert suggestion these Good Germans offer, "if at first you don't succeed give up", I'd be miserable like millions of other depowered humans on our little globe today. But I believe in possibility, and I'll eventually get my imagination working like it's supposed to. It took me years to define the problem, more years to find a solution, and another three years to implement it.

Yes, I much prefer the old "if at first you don't succeed, try try again." Not the same thing over and over, of course, but always trying something new.

Obligatory Cool Hand Luke quote (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175644)

Captain, Road Prison 36 [imdb.com]

What we've got here is... failure to communicate.
Some men you just can't reach.
So you get what we had here last week, which is the way he wants it...
well, he gets it.
I don't like it any more than you men.

bah humbug (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175666)

the ability to learn new things is a learned behavior in itself, some are just slower at it than others (and some are really slow), and a few are exceptionally well at it...

personally i think i am just average, maybe slightly below average on those days when my brain feels like a light-bulb that has been left on for too long, you know the kind of light-bulb that is sort of yellowed with a slight buzzing sound and a few fried bugs stuck to it...

Article and/or research is not so good... (2, Interesting)

mattis_f (517228) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175686)

Maybe the article is badly written, but it appears as if the scientists are jumping conclusions. The test subjects were asked to pick a symbol, they got feedback in the form of a smiley face or an angry face. Some short time later they were asked to pick a symbol again. If they now picked the happy face, the scientists assumed they had learned.

Somehow, I doubt that seeing a smiley face is enough of a reward to make the subject avoid making the same choice again. I mean, the angry face might look more interesting, or the subject might just wonder what happens if the takes the other card (given that he took the happy one first).

I'm just saying - there could be many reasons other than "not learning" why a person picks the symbol that gives an unhappy face as a result. Hopefully, the scientists thought of this, but it's not in the article (as far as I can tell).

Experience (1)

YU5333021 (1093141) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175712)

To paraphrase my cultural history professor: "Experience is bullshit. There is nothing preventing one from repeating the same mistakes the world over. The positive adjective we should be looking for in our peers (and ourselves) is credibility: consistence, critical thinking. This manifests through a lifetime of work, and is not easily quantifiable. Nothing you could gage by reading someone's resume."

He had a thick jewish-german accent and looked like a James Bond villain. Re-read the above in appropriate accent (while rubbing your palms together),

In other news... (2, Interesting)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | more than 6 years ago | (#22175736)

"OS/2 Supporters Petition IBM To Open OS/2 Source In 2008"

"Bill Gates Says Capitalism Shouldn't Be So Cut-Throat"

"Microsoft Says Current Windows Is The Most Secure"
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