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iPhone Application Key Leaked

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the sign-early-and-often dept.

Cellphones 247

HighWizard writes with word from Engadget that the iPhone SDK Key has been leaked early. "We're not exactly sure how this all went down, but we trust Erica Sadun over at TUAW when she says that it appears that the iPhone's SDK key — which will probably be required by all 'official' third-party apps — has been leaked. Two different sites currently have the key posted, but it's all just for show until next month, when the SDK hits for real — and the code is undoubtedly changed."

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247 comments

Bummer :-( (4, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217584)

If you find something like this, you sit on it until after release. Now, Apple will probably update the release version of the SDK with a tighter authorisation system.

Regardless, it's fruitless for Apple to try & stop free third party apps. If enough people are interested, there will always be someone able & willing to crack Apple's DRM.

Oh, and here's a special message for any Apple Fanboi's in the house [188458a6d1...d43774.com] . (not my site)

Re:Bummer :-( (5, Funny)

SpeedyDX (1014595) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217636)

Regardless, it's fruitless for Apple to try & stop free third party apps.
Yeah, the core of the problem is locking-in the SDK in the first place. They should adopt a less rotten attitude and just open it up for any developer to contribute free apps to the platform.

OK, I'm done. Ready to take the karma beating.

Re:Bummer :-( (4, Funny)

fangorious (1024903) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217664)

can you try to pear down the puns?

Re:Bummer :-( (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217732)

Mod parent down for bad puns.

Re:Bummer :-( (5, Insightful)

DeepZenPill (585656) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218124)

They're only sewing the seeds of their own destruction by introducing more restrictions to developers.

Re:Bummer :-( (4, Interesting)

webmaster404 (1148909) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217638)

Exactly, just look at game consoles. Just a few days ago they managed to find a way to run homebrew code on the Wii without a modchip. All DRM is quickly broken if there is enough interest. I still don't get why they do it, if I get a computer, I should be able to run whatever program I want on it, change the OS, overclock it ETC.

Re:Bummer :-( (3, Insightful)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217980)

Game consoles aren't sold as general purpose computers. The hardware is purely a means to an end, what they're really trying to sell is the games. With the Wii, they're still hard enough to get in many places, I don't think they want to sell them to people that aren't going to be buying the games. With the other two consoles, they're sold at a loss with the intent that it will be made up for in licence fees, so it's not necessarily in their best interest to let you do just anything with them.

Re:Bummer :-( (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218268)

Why is that my problem?
Sounds to me like they fucked up in pricing on the console, as well as the games.

But who the hell are you and me to tell large companys how to do their thing?

They wanna sell it for $400? Ok, ill buy it for that. Now quitchurbitchin bout what i do with my own property, plzktnx.

Re:Bummer :-( (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218428)

I think you're arguing with something that he didn't say.

Bummer :-(-The "ME" SDK. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218630)

"Why is that my problem?"

I know the whole "The world revolves around me" is big around here but cheating in multiplayer and MMORGS are good reasons to "tell you what to do with your 'property'".

Re:Bummer :-(-The "ME" SDK. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218730)

If you are going to spend all that time and effort, possibly bricking your $400 console, just to fucking cheat in a game... you have failed at life.

Re:Bummer :-( (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218180)

Just a few days ago they managed to find a way to run homebrew code on the Wii without a modchip. All DRM is quickly broken if there is enough interest.
You must have a different definition of "quickly" than me. The Wii has been out for well over a year.

Re:Bummer :-( (2, Insightful)

enoz (1181117) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218258)

if I get a computer, I should be able to run whatever program I want on it, change the OS, overclock it ETC.
You mean like you can do with your cellphone, GPS, microwave, digital watch, and PlayStation 1?

I do however agree with your sentiment in relation to general purpose personal computers, I dislike having TrustedComputing forced onto us as much as the next nerd.

Re:Bummer :-( (1)

superash (1045796) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218534)

I still don't get why they do it, if I get a computer, I should be able to run whatever program I want on it, change the OS, overclock it ETC.

The restrictions on third-party apps is always done in the interest of the user. Imagine you open stallman.jpg and the next thing you know is that all your contacts and sms are wiped off and you had not backed them up. The same applies to third-party apps that look innocent but if they were given full access to the phone they can harm the flash disk or cause infinite reboots etc etc.. which is why even Nokia has the "capabilites" thingy and "symbian signed" thingy for all apps.

Now, when some app causes your phone to not boot up you will obviously go to apple, if your phone flash disk is not readble you will go to apple, if everytime you call someone an sms is sent to them then you will go to apple and get it re-flashed/repaired. So, apple has to come up with some kind of security check for the application and this was probably the fastest way.

Re:Bummer :-( (2, Insightful)

penix1 (722987) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218616)

It has little to do with the user's protection. Let's face it, they don't give a crap about users that break their phones. After all, they are there to sell new phones to the one that breaks their old phone.

It has everything to do with protecting the phone network which *IS* their responsibility to repair when trashed. Users be damned when it comes to breaking the phone but break the network, we can't have that!

Re:Bummer :-( (3, Insightful)

amorsen (7485) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218674)

It has everything to do with protecting the phone network which *IS* their responsibility to repair when trashed. Users be damned when it comes to breaking the phone but break the network, we can't have that!

It is quite difficult to break the phone network with a phone, especially when you can't mess with the actual GSM/EDGE chip but only the one running programs. If that's the excuse to lock the phone, it's a seriously bad one.

Re:Bummer :-( (2, Interesting)

craagz (965952) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218710)

if I get a computer, I should be able to run whatever program I want on it, change the OS, overclock it ETC


If you overclocked a computer you will render useless the available faster computer. If you change the OS, you are switching the loyalties established by the computer company and the OS company.

That is the reason why most warranties go void when you do any of the above.

All things done in the name of protecting markets.

Re:Bummer :-( (4, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217642)

Now, Apple will probably update the release version of the SDK with a tighter authorisation system.
What makes you think that crackers got the key from the SDK's "authorization system" and not from an Apple insider?

Re:Bummer :-( (1, Funny)

glitch23 (557124) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218094)

What makes you think that crackers got the key from the SDK's "authorization system" and not from an Apple insider?

Well in that case we just need tighter Apple insiders....how many of those insiders are women I wonder?

Re:Bummer :-( (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217798)

And even worse for anyone who's had to go through the (very painful) process of jailbreaking 1.3, it means likely having to do it AGAIN.

Re:Bummer :-( (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218758)

Perhaps you should have held off buying an iPhone... you would likely be happier to watch this mess from the sidelines.

Re:Bummer :-( (4, Informative)

Admiral Ag (829695) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217816)

Forgive me if I misunderstand you, but where does it say that Apple is not going to allow free app downloads?

I can see why they would want an authorization system, because they have already expressed their worries about iPhone malware. Moreover, Apple was going to have to distribute the apps anyway, because most people use iTunes to manage their iPhones. The hackers among us will find a way around it, but the idea seems to be to protect ordinary users, not frustrate the uber leet among us (of which I am not one).

I'd be surprised if there weren't free downloads anyway along with the pay stuff. It may well be in the interest of some developers to offer free apps that complement their pay offerings or web services. The kind of small widgets that people will make are free anyway (and Dashboard widgets tend to be free). Podcasts are free, so it's not like iTunes doesn't already offer free content. Hell, they offer free DRMed songs every week.

In any case, even if the apps do start off on a pay basis, I'm guessing that pressure from developers will lead to free apps being offered.

Re:Bummer :-( (2, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218506)

Forgive me if I misunderstand you, but where does it say that Apple is not going to allow free app downloads?

It's not that Apple not going to allow free app downloads - the issue is how much Apple will charge to sign your app.

If the charge is anything other than $0, it becomes impractical for third party developers to offer their apps for free.

Re:Bummer :-( (2, Interesting)

amsr (125191) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218556)

Who says apple is going to prevent "free" applications. Just because they want to sign apps that go on the phone, doesn't mean you have to pay for them. They likely want to protect the network. In any case, very high quality freeware/shareware are a large part of the value of the mac and have been since its inception. I seriously doubt they would stand in the way of this on the iphone. Time will tell..

Fuck that. Where's 10.5.2? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217612)

Well? Still waiting on the busted airport fix.

but it's all just for show until next month.... (4, Insightful)

clambake (37702) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217654)

... when the SDK hits for real -- and the code is undoubtedly changed. ... and re-leaked.

Re:but it's all just for show until next month.... (2, Interesting)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218330)

Not likely, where I work, we use public/private key pairs to sign all code the goes out the door. Each developer has their own key pair for doing internal work on components which must be signed to work in our system, and only myself (I'm the lead developer/buildmaster) and the CEO have the password to the master certificate. One of our developers COULD leak their key. At which point I would promptly point to the part of their contract which stipulates doing so is grounds for immediate termination.

Considering that our development machines are on a physically seperate network with no direct internet access, there aren't many excuses which will fly if a developer claims virus/malware/accident. You have to go out of your way to let a key slip out.

So, assuming apple has the same sort of security internally, and they'd have to if they plan on requiring digital sigs on iPhone apps, then its highly likely the 'leak' won't have 'access' to the key used in the final build since they'll likely be arrested if they go near the office.

In my case fortunately our developers really don't have much of a reason to leak the keys anyway, the are used in very specific instances for a few very select and ... particular customers. The security precautions we take with the keys are actually very silly for what they are used for, but the point is, apple more than likely will know who leaked the key, and it >won't happen again since they'll never get another valid key and the leaked key will simply be revoked without any damage since no one has legitimately received any apps signed with it yet.

Does It Really Matter? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217670)

Has anyone ACTUALLY seen someone in REAL LIFE with an iPhone?

I am surrounded by people who use Windows, Macs, and Linux and have huge amounts of disposable income they love to spend of giant HD TVs, computers, game consoles, and pretty much anything electronic and remotely interesting.

Not a single person I know has an iPhone, wants an iPhone, or expressed any interest in the product whatsoever.

And out in the street, at bars and restaurants, and the variety of high tech companies I've been to I have yet to actually see an iPhone. Obviously there are people who have bought the phone and most likely spend nights cradling it in their arms knowing their life is now complete.

Other than something the emo demographic buys to sit with at coffee shops hoping emo members of the opposite sex notice them using their iPhone and realize how special they are, who they hell would want this product? It basically looks like nothing more than a crappy phone with a gigantic marketing budget.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (0, Flamebait)

TheSHAD0W (258774) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217726)

Apple's been bragging that they've sold >3 million of the buggers. That basically means only one in about a hundred people in the US has one of the damned things. Of course their users are difficult to find.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (3, Insightful)

NalosLayor (958307) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217868)

Seriously? You're sneering at 1 in 100? Selling one copy of your product to every 100 Americans in half a year? That's staggeringly successful. I'm no apple fanboy, but come on, that's freakin' impressive.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

natenovs (1055338) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217996)

vista?

Re:Does It Really Matter? (2, Interesting)

DECS (891519) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218098)

Microsoft isn't selling Vista at retail at all. Even new PCs, which typically all come with whatever version of Windows Microsoft wants, have vastly outnumbered the sales of 100M Vista licenses Microsoft is counting. That means most new PCs sold in 2007 shipped with XP!

As for the OP wondering where the iPhones are, if you live in the middle of nowhere, you might be seeing a diluted number of iPhones. Try going to a concert in a major US city and not spotting lots of them. An increasing number of the amateur porn mirror pics I've seen online are taken with iPhones. In other words, they're mostly in populated areas where affluent early adopter people live.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

natenovs (1055338) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218152)

"You're sneering at 1 in 100?" well, since vista sales are around the 20 million mark, then it seems like you are sneering at a sales rate of 1 in 15 people.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

DECS (891519) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218336)

One difference is that Vista isn't being sold only in the US.

The other difference is that Vista isn't an entirely new product entering a competitive market, but merely an adjusted version of a product that enjoys a monopoly position. Even so, it is clearly be rejected in the consumer market, at retail, and by corporations.

Another difference is that Vista is a liberally accounted software license, not a product people buy. So Microsoft can count all the vouchers it handed out as sales, and can count all the PCs that are hit with the Windows Tax as sales, despite the fact that corporations are re-imaging them with Win2k or XP. Many laptops ship with a Vista/XP Downgrade DVD for good reason.

CES: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas [roughlydrafted.com]

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218652)

Bottom line - whether companies keep Vista on a desktop or not, Microsoft sold the license. They got the money for the product. They sell a LOT of Vista licenses. A lot more than iPhones.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (4, Insightful)

fangorious (1024903) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217736)

Since you asked, I've seen plenty. Including two people I work with (a Java developer and an InstallShield developer), one unlocked for Tmobile. Seen a few at grocery stores and hockey rinks. Also know of at least one person at Harmonix who has one. I want one myself (but I'm waiting for the final word on first telecom immunity and second the current lawsuits against AT&T and friends). I like the interface. Everyone I know who has played with one agrees that it has the best interface. I've tried to use other similar features on nokia, samsung, and motorola phones, and even manage to convince myself of their adequacy. Until I pick up an iphone and realize the sad truth that for the market segment it targets, nothing else I've tried out comes close to the iphone.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

glitch23 (557124) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218158)

Since you asked, I've seen plenty. Including two people I work with (a Java developer and an InstallShield developer), one unlocked for Tmobile. Seen a few at grocery stores and hockey rinks. Also know of at least one person at Harmonix who has one. I want one myself (but I'm waiting for the final word on first telecom immunity and second the current lawsuits against AT&T and friends). I like the interface. Everyone I know who has played with one agrees that it has the best interface. I've tried to use other similar features on nokia, samsung, and motorola phones, and even manage to convince myself of their adequacy. Until I pick up an iphone and realize the sad truth that for the market segment it targets, nothing else I've tried out comes close to the iphone.

Well my anecdote goes like this, I know at least 200 people with the vast majority being coworkers who are technical people. Out of all those people I know 1 of them has an iPhone and he is a new employee that's been with us just a few months.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218196)

The iPhone really is a complete piece of shit.

It is awkward to hold.
It is awkward to talk into/listen to.
It too big/bulky compared to the better phones out there.
It offers nothing other phones don't already have and is missing huge amounts of features other phones have had for a long time.
It is overpriced.
It has a shitty contract.

If you find yourself being drawn to the iPhone it really is time to look in the mirror and come to grips with the fact that you are leading a sad and pathetic life desperately looking for something 'shiny' to compensate.

Anyone who believes marketing is all a bunch of bullshit just needs to look at the iPhone.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218498)

The iPod touch looks like it has a very nice interface. Much better than anything else out there, and making the whole thing the screen is brilliant for a device intended for video & music.

A few things could make iPod touch much better: GPS and internet access. To that end it has wifi, and no GPS, but as far as the wiki knows, the iPhone doesn't have GPS either? (This seems odd, since *all* phones in the past few years have GPS in them as the least hassle way of satisfying e911 requirements, I thought)

An internal graphing calculator also seems like a natural fit. There's no reason that those things should be stuck with basically mid-90s technology when there are now handheld devices with more processing power than early 2000s desktop computers.

Anyway, you're right. Sticking a phone and a crappy camera in an iPod touch just makes a less-than-ideal phone and adds cost to the pocket media player.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (2, Insightful)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218666)

It is awkward to hold.
It is awkward to talk into/listen to.
It too big/bulky compared to the better phones out there.
...
It is overpriced.
It has a shitty contract.


Fixed that to make it sound more like you just described my Blackberry 8830. However, unlike an iPhone owner, I was attracted to the Blackberry because of the convergence it offered me. I've had the device for two months now and I'm about an order of magnitude more organized than I was before I got it. Of course, that doesn't mean that everyone in the world is going to be attracted to my phone's sleek features... Er, I mean Exchange integration, but that one feature alone makes it better than any other phone I've ever used. Including the iPhone.

It's about market and desire. Some people will never see that. And Steve Jobs will keep getting richer because he can.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

tholomyes (610627) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218570)

I've seen at least three at work, and can think of two I've seen in the wild. I've thought about getting one to unlock for T-Mobile, but I like having a phone that I'm not going to worry too much about.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217752)

I know I'm feading a troll...

I own an iPhone, I like my iPhone. My life is not complete but I am happy with my decision.

Captcha: timeout

Re:Does It Really Matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217762)

"Has anyone ACTUALLY seen someone in REAL LIFE with an iPhone?"

I finally did about a month ago. There is a guy who recently inherited a large amount of money from his mother who bought one.

Other than that, no. The iPhone, unlike the iPod, pretty much appears to exists for the 99.9 percent of the world only on Net discussion boards like Slashdot. There is still a tremendous amount of inertia from Apple fans who built up the iPhone like the arrival of a messiah that hasn't caught up with the reality of the phone really being nothing more than yet another overpriced, overhyped, and underfeatured Apple product.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217846)

The only person I know with one is a pharmacist I know. She said she loves it.

I don't many people with any phones running windows either. Most everyone has a regular (in the sense that it's not a touch screen) phone.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217848)

4 or 5 where I work. Air Force computer geeks.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

Anonymous Freak (16973) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217876)

Alright. Not emo. Don't go to coffee shops very often (in Portland, of all places, second only to Seattle in people per coffee shop!)

Yet I see them very regularly. At a concert (not emo) over the weekend, I saw at least five within a 10-person radius of me.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218056)

Well, double-emo on you!

Re:Does It Really Matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217964)

Just go to any college campus. That is where almost everyone is sporting an iPhone and some type of Macbook because of the perception that Apple isn't "establishment"... which is ironic knowing the vendor lock-in Apple does.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218474)

... which is ironic knowing the vendor lock-in Apple does.

Yeah, total lock-in. I just wish that, when the time comes that I start to feel the lock-in, it would be possible to install Windows XP, or Vista, or one of those many x86 Linux distros on my MacBook. Oh wait, I can install any one of those. I could even run all of them at the same time along with Mac OS X and run any application I feel like.

Dang Apple and their lock-in.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (2, Interesting)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218064)

Has anyone ACTUALLY seen someone in REAL LIFE with an iPhone?

Four off the top of my head. Three coworkers and a friend from Canada. (He unlocked it to work with Rogers.) I could probably come up with more if I thought hard enough about it.

In comparison, everyone I know who had a Windows Mobile phone ended up drop-kicking it and replacing with just a plain-jane phone. Biggest complaint? "At least I can make calls on this phone. Which is more than I can say for my Windows phone..."

Re:Does It Really Matter? (2, Interesting)

the_wesman (106427) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218294)

I've seen a lot - I've got one - one of my close friends has one - her ex-boyfriend has one - several people (3 I can think of off the top of my head) I work with have them - I see them in the elevator - on the subway - in the airport - at parties - bars - I'm actually amazed how many people have them - and the diverse types of people, frankly.

Re:Does It Really Matter? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218326)

>I've got one

LOL, what a loser...

Re:Does It Really Matter? (1)

p0tat03 (985078) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218396)

It's certainly taken hold of the enthusiast market rather than the world at large - but really, without contract subsidization that's the best they could hope for. I have one, I know 2 close friends that have one, and 3 more people I kind-of know that have one.

I've seen at least 5 others around town over the last 2-3 months.

Definitely not as popular as, say, the RAZR, but not doing too badly for itself I say.

Okay, so... (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217680)

The key gets revoked, a new one is issued, and third party developers have their apps resigned with the new (and valid) key. Since it's public knowledge now, how is this a huge deal? Unless of course the iPhone doesn't check for key revocation... I know next to nothing about how it operates, since I don't own one.

I like the iPhone.... (2, Insightful)

PolarBearFire (1176791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217712)

I like the iPhone because it's fun but why are we fighting so hard just to make it run programs that we want? Does anyone see something totally wrong with this? Sure DRM will always get broken but Apple also has a history of screwing users who do. I'm in the market for an iPhone but this constant back and forth is giving me pause. I don't Apple to nickel and dime me for every little thing that I put on the iPhone, especially since I would be stuck for 2 years with it.

Re:I like the iPhone.... (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217878)

Like almost everything else in life, it comes down to a personal choice. Hey, I love and use open platforms as much as the next guy. That said, part of what has always set Apple apart is the fact that users could always count on something "just working". I'm not talking about power users, hard-core programmers, etc. I'm talking about the vast majority of the installed userbase. You didn't have compatibility and stability problems like PC users.

I think the same philosophy applies to the iPhone. You buy it because it does a set of things you want done, and does those things consistently well. While I understand the desire for completely open third party app support, this isn't part of Apple's revenue model for their product, and could indeed introduce platform stability issues in the public's eye. Just my two cents.

Re:I like the iPhone.... (1)

PolarBearFire (1176791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217938)

I appreciate your point of view but if you look into it the iPhone and other Apple computers do suffer crashes and stability problems. Since I'm not a user of either I can't verify whether it's true or not. But if it's true, it's almost inexcusable since Apple controls both hardware and software so tightly.

Re:I like the iPhone.... (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218026)

Macs certainly do crash on occasion. Given that a Mac with only Apple software would be quite frustratingly limited to use, I wouldn't know if that would help at all. It's certainly not often enough that I'll give up third party software, I'd probably give up Macs first.

I think iPhones are a bit more constrained in some ways, it's a portable computer, but a handset platform like that doesn't necessarily have hardware preemptive multitasking to assure that the device can recover from an errant program.

Also, the rumor was that the iPhone was behind in development anyway, they might have decided they needed to put an SDK on the backburner, and they even backburnered Leopard by reassinging Leopard coders to iPhone just to push the thing out the door.

Re:I like the iPhone.... (2, Informative)

bnenning (58349) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218466)

I think iPhones are a bit more constrained in some ways, it's a portable computer, but a handset platform like that doesn't necessarily have hardware preemptive multitasking to assure that the device can recover from an errant program.

It's running a Darwin kernel, so it certainly has preemptive multitasking and memory protection. In my limited experience writing iPhone apps, if you stomp on an invalid memory location the app just dies and it goes back to the main screen

Re:I like the iPhone.... (1)

palegray.net (1195047) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218088)

I would agree that routine crashes would be inexcusable on a platform that Apple maintains firm control over for both the hardware and software side (in traditional Apple style). Maybe it's the age-old problem of rushing products to market for competitive reasons (i.e. Microsoft's "tried-and-true" (but sucky) saying of "it's good enough").

Re:I like the iPhone.... (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218500)

I'm actually typing this on my Touch from which I'm reading slashdot. My advice? Use a cellphone to make calls and don't try to make it do everything... Then buy a Touch to run all the fun stuff. I'm going to hold off on jailbreaking this one until after I see the official sdk... Its a pretty useful machine as-is out of the box. Who needs an air... I own the thinnest Mac Apple makes.

Personally I don't know why people are so up in arms about apple's desire to sign all code. It doesn't necessarily mean restrictions or lack of freedom... Just lack of anonymity for the developer. I kind of wish all software was signed. If it were all signed as a matter of course malware would be pretty easy to avoid.

Re:I like the iPhone.... (0, Redundant)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218194)

I see something wrong. It's that you're willing to give Apple money despite the lock-in they're trying to achieve on the iPhone. If you Apple fanboys were interested in changing things, you would have all collectively have said "We're not buying the fucking thing until you open it up." Believe me, Apple would do what the consumer wanted, if the consumer in question wasn't an out-of-control techno-addict who hands over the credit card first and then asks questions later.

Re:I like the iPhone.... (1)

PolarBearFire (1176791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218392)

Apple fanboy? I'm running freaking Vista for pete's sake!(Vista is not bad enough for me to go through the trouble of reinstalling XP) I haven't been drooling over the iPhone. I'm just in the market for a smartphone/music player right now and the iPhone looks the most fun right now. I'm perfectly willing to jailbreak the iPhone so I can do whatever I want with it. Plus Steve Jobs is not known for listening to consumers, he just expects people to like things that he thinks are cool. Sometimes he's right sometimes he's wrong, I expect the new Air computer thingy will end with the same fate as that cube thingy.

words of apples (1)

bjmoneyxxx (1227784) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217722)

"You can count how many keys are in apple, but not how many apples are in the key." --butchered ken kesey quote

The key is 1 2 3 4 5! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22217862)

In unrelated news, Steve Jobs announced today that he was going to change the combination on his luggage.

Meh (5, Insightful)

MrCopilot (871878) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217912)

I wish I cared, I tried extra hard but still nothing.

If I want a phone I can modify I should buy a phone that allows it.

Is the iPhone sleek and sexy? Of course, but so are a host of supermodels that I would not want to get into a 2 hour conversation with let alone a 2 yr relationship.

I feel the same way about the iPhone, I'd like to play with one for a little while, but thats about it.

Re:Meh (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217976)

If I want a phone I can modify I should buy a phone that allows it.

I buy hardware because it runs the software I want to run, not because of the hardware itself. There are some amazing third-party applications for the iPhone. I'm not aware of a phone that isn't an iPhone that can run those applications. It's just a shame that there is so much effort required to run those applications. Hopefully the SDK will remove the need to jailbreak the phone, but I have my doubts.

Re:Meh (1)

TheCouchPotatoFamine (628797) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218148)

why the huge emphasis on the iPhone in your statment? Personally, the jailbroken iPod touch is a FanTastic unix-in-your-pocket book reading music playing web-serving powerhouse that is smaller and sexier to hold and use. Really, my POV, I'll be keeping my current phone and using the awesome touch as what it is, the slickest pocket computer ever made.

Re:Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218288)

Keeping with your "supermodel" analogy, lets say that the iphone is a supermodel, and the N95 US is a cute geek girl.

Now the iphone is much sexier, but has less features I care about then the N95 US. Though it does have enough to keep me interested for a couple of years, and look, there is another one that holds my interest even more! So are you the type of person that likes new, shiny, and sexy, or something that will be able to handle all your jobs until the whole system of data changes again?

Now what if you could swap out that supermodels limited brain with that of the geek girl, with just a little effort? Sure its unsupported, but its the best of both worlds. Or what if you want the geek brain, the supermodel body, and that sheer sexiness of the accountant down the street... I know my iPhone has an HP 15C emulation, NES, cell phone triangulation, AIM, IRC, Zork, Digital zoom on the camera, unlocked to work with any network (she swings both ways...), and so much more...

Re:Meh (1)

amirulbahr (1216502) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218376)

Is the iPhone sleek and sexy? Of course, but so are a host of supermodels that I would not want to get into a 2 hour conversation with...

I feel the same way about the status of voice recognition in today's phones. I wouldn't exactly call them "super" models though.

Re:Meh (3, Funny)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218400)

I call bullshit. Its not like your going to get better conversation in the 2 hours to 2 years you're going to spend playing WoW instead.

The iPhone is not sleek and sexy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218564)

Unless sleek=useful and sexy=intuitive. I dislike the locked-down nature of the phone, too, and it's criminal the way we can't use any phone on any network, and program our phones however we want them. But Apple hit it out of the park anyway. The thing represents a triumph of user interface, and a semi-triumph of engineering sensibility- it does what it does quite well, despite limited resources and restrictive licensing.

why all the effort? (-1, Flamebait)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#22217918)

the iphone is a locked down piece of crap. why put your effort into breaking into it, when there's lots of open smart phones you can install your apps on.

Re:why all the effort? (5, Informative)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218054)

the iphone is a locked down piece of crap.

If anything locked down is a piece of crap then I guess you're right. But if you're saying it's locked down and is a piece of crap on its own, I think I disagree. Me and probably 95% of the people who have ever touched one.

Opinions aside, I wonder if Apple was so against opening it up because they wanted to reserve the right to change the APIs to fit any updates they planned in the future. With control of the few installed apps, they can make core changes to the OS to extend the abilities of the iPhone, then rewrite the parts of the apps to fit with the new core. If they let anyone make apps, they'd either break them everytime the core changed (see the last 3 updates for examples) or they'd have to stabilize the core (which is probably what they've done now that they're releasing an SDK).

I wonder if this is just prep for iPhone 2...let people go crazy with the first iPhone, and save the lockdown for the greater iPhone 2 soon to arrive.

"Dude...3G is cool and all, but you can't even customize your apps on iPhone2. Check out this gnarly rdesktop client I've made..."

Re:why all the effort? (0, Troll)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218122)

i guess it's not a total hunk of junk on it's own, but it's not providing anything other smart phones haven't had for atleast 12 months prior, when combined with the terrible contract you have to be on i'd say it's a piece of crap for sure.

Slashdot - rumours for nerds (5, Insightful)

enoz (1181117) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218034)

We're not exactly sure how this all went down, but we trust Erica Sadun over at TUAW when she says that it appears that the iPhone's SDK key -- which will probably be required by all 'official' third-party apps -- has been leaked.
Next month, when the SDK comes out, apparently this key may or may not work. Fantastic!

Here's another SDK key that was apparently discovered on a blog so is probably true:
47 6F 47 65 74 41 46 69 72 73 74 69 4C 69 66 65

"It's true, a blog confirms it!"

Symmetric key used to protect iPhone?! (4, Interesting)

Myria (562655) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218356)

The purported key is only 16 bytes. There is no current public-key algorithm capable of maintaining security at a 128-bit key size. If that's a legitimate key, it's definitely a symmetric key. Symmetric cryptography has the obvious problem that the device necessarily must have the key inside of it somewhere, meaning that a reverse engineer could find it.

If Apple used a symmetric key to protect against unauthorized software, it would imply incompetence with cryptography. I highly doubt this is true. It's more likely that it's not.

Re:Symmetric key used to protect iPhone?! (1)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218420)

Good. I was afraid I was the only one who noticed that. 128-bit RSA can be cracked in minutes on a typical computer... maybe an hour.... I'm not sure what those numbers are, but there's no way they are what these people are claiming.... That's probably short by at -least- an order of magnitude.

Re:Symmetric key used to protect iPhone?! (1)

Myria (562655) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218478)

More like less than a second on 3 GHz P4 (although this only has minute granularity):

(22:10) gp > p=nextprime(random(2^64))
%1 = 6011673201679823947
(22:11) gp > q=nextprime(random(2^64))
%2 = 6987193563793194751
(22:11) gp > factorint(p*q)
%4 =
[6011673201679823947 1]

[6987193563793194751 1]

Re:Symmetric key used to protect iPhone?! (4, Insightful)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218650)

Its far more likely that its simply an md5 fingerprint or something silly. One of the blogs listed in the summary is for a guy who loves stringing people along in an extremely retarded way. Definately some attention issues. Either way, I'm not aware of any public/private key systems that would be considered very secure with a 128 bit key since you need a considerably larger key size with public/private key systems because large your limited to using prime numbers and stuff like that. While I'm not sure of the exact time involved, but since 1024bit certificates are considered 'weak' now days, I doubt cracking a 128 bit private key would be extremely difficult, especially with the possiblity of using distributed computing over the internet. Its either a hash or a symetrical encryption key used to obsfucate something to have the hax0rs waste some time, or a horrible implementation. You pick

Get yourself a blackberry! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218370)

RIM makes it easy, with SDKs, documentation, and an open platform.

You also get strong end-to-end encryption that has been audited by many governments.

Admittedly, blackberries aren't as shiny as the iphone, but it's a much better platform.

Re:Get yourself a blackberry! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218618)

Yeah, but the blackberry is a pile of stinking shit. There has to be some *reason* to code. You have to *want* to do something, and with my (spit) blackberry, the only think I want to do is crap on it. Pity work bought me one of those instead of an iPhone.

iPhone sucks and so is your face! (-1, Troll)

Fizzl (209397) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218438)

What's with all this hoopla about iPhone? It's a crappy product! If Nokia had released that piece of garbage, they would be booed off the stage!

Which leads to my other gripe about Mac products. Why is MacBook so coveted? I just twiddled with one for the first time couple of weeks ago, and found the mechanics to be, frankly, shitty. The thing is so plasticy and wobbly that you couldn't find such piece of travesty on any of the major laptop manufacturers proto-shops.

I uderstand that Paris Hilton buys shitty plastic shoes for $10k. I don't get you, the supposedly informed IT crowd! Don't buy the Mac shit! Don't be Paris Hilton!

Publishing this takes balls. (2, Funny)

Kaenneth (82978) | more than 6 years ago | (#22218576)


The key I got from an Apple insider is: 01 02 03 04 05

Re:Publishing this takes balls. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22218748)

Maybe it's an abbreviation for It is Apple's policy [apple.com.sg] not to comment on unannounced products or products under development, whether or not they actually exist. Nor is it our policy to discuss release dates.
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