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The Next 25 Years in Tech

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the technosticating-the-future dept.

Technology 166

PCWMike writes "PCs may disappear from your desk by 2033. But with digital technology showing up everywhere else — including inside your body — computing will only get more personal, reports Dan Tynan for PC World's 25th Anniversary. While convenience will be increased by leaps and bounds, it will come at a profound loss in our sense of what privacy means. 'Technology will become firmly embedded in advanced devices that deliver information and entertainment to our homes and our hip pockets, in sensors that monitor our environment from within the walls and floors of our homes, and in chips that deliver medicine and augment reality inside our bodies. This shiny happy future world will come at a cost, though: Think security and privacy concerns. So let's hope that our jetpacks come with seat belts, because it's going to be a wild ride.'"

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No PC, no LAN (1)

LMacG (118321) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253092)

Between this and the previous article, my desk will be clean and I'll have lots of open power and cabling ports.

In other news, I'm going to start a publication whose name ends in "world" so I can get automatic posting on /. Think of all the page impressions I can bill for!

Re:No PC, no LAN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253228)

Like endoftheworld.com?

Jim, Jim! Are you alright??? (1)

Mandovert (1140887) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253096)

...Yeah, yeah, I just accidentally opened that hello.jpg picture.

Disappear from the desk? (2, Interesting)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253130)

Only if it becomes part of the desk...there will always be a place for desks and tables, even if only as a method of organizing things in one place and having a 'base of operations' to work from.

Though I wouldn't mind having a gargoyle rig, a la the gent in Snow Crash. We've almost got the tech for it now, save only that I don't know of a good portable input method that doesn't require poking at a tiny screen or a mini keyboard...

Re:Disappear from the desk? (3, Funny)

blindd0t (855876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253554)

Only if it becomes part of the desk...there will always be a place for desks and tables...

Yep! Big ass tables [youtube.com] are the next big thing!

http://xkcd.com/37/ (1, Insightful)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253966)

Subj.

Nothing to add.

Re:http://xkcd.com/37/ (1)

dnwq (910646) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254618)

What about a link? [xkcd.com]

What timing (1)

suso (153703) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253134)

Heh, just an hour ago we got a Jack PC wall plugin thin client and were playing with it.

Billy, get in here right now... (1)

nebrshugyo (1216152) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253196)

...or I'll yank that phone right out of your head!

southland tales (3, Funny)

jameseyjamesey (949408) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253242)

scientists say the future will be 33% more futuristic

Re:southland tales (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254834)

33% less, you mean. Futurism was better in the past. I mean, they had flying cars in their future. We don't even try, any more.

Bio-CPU? (1)

imstanny (722685) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253316)

I'm surprised they didn't mention the transition of CPUs into some sort of biological form factor. Speeds at which cells communicate and transfer data can be introduced into a controlled process. The benefts are speed and infinite increase in energy efficiency...

Re:Bio-CPU? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253494)

You're very stupid.

Re:Bio-CPU? (2, Insightful)

Arthur B. (806360) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253502)

What !? Speed is not the benefit, it's the drawback ! CPUs are order of magnitude faster than cellular processes. What you gain from biology is cheap scalability, but certainly not raw speed.

Re:Bio-CPU? (1)

police inkblotter (1228830) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253724)

For cellular information transfer, yes, but information transfer among neurons is much, much more efficient than with what we have now (iirc).

Re:Bio-CPU? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22254154)

Neurons are slow. This is why we have reflexes. It takes too much time to send the data that you touched something hot to your head and then processes it, then send a response back to move your hand.

WTF? (5, Insightful)

mrbcs (737902) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253366)

What is this? Bullshit day on Slashdot?
First they took away our lan,
then the internet infrastructure stateside needs $100 million,
now they want to take away my computer.. shit. give it up already.

These guys can barely forecast seasons and they're going to tell us what's going to happen in 25 years? As the tag says, "Where's my flying car?"

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253532)

Your flying car is in storage hold 12-A2.

Re:WTF? (1)

Mandovert (1140887) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253536)

Here, corrected for you: $100 billion

Re:WTF? (1)

Bryansix (761547) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254868)

Hey, I tried. I submitted an article about today being the 50th anniversary of the United States entering the space age thanks to JPL but it hasn't seem to get onto the front page yet.

Re:WTF? (1)

sonicimpulse (807688) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255788)

Yes I have to agree this is definitely bullshit day on /.

Where's my flying car? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22256476)

"Where's my flying car?"

The flying car is so passe. Jetpacks are where it's at!

"Greentech" (2)

jwietelmann (1220240) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253386)

The immediate future of technology will have a very eco-conscious angle. Some of it will be legitimately good for the earth and society. A lot of it will be merely fashionable. But maybe, just maybe, we can finally dispel the myth that ethanol from corn is good for anyone but ADM.

singularity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253420)

An article on the next 25 years of tech without a single mention of the singularity. It must be a Skynet plant . . .

FEMBOT (2, Funny)

Major Blud (789630) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253470)

I can't wait that long....I'll be 55 by then and I'm not sure if I'll still have the libido to keep up with a fembot.

Re:FEMBOT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22255754)

Fembots don't move very fast, being considerably smaller than nanobots. I think you'll have no trouble keeping up

Electronics not to put in my body (1)

trunkthink (1229288) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253474)

I couldn't imagine Microsoft electronics in my body.

Re:Electronics not to put in my body (2, Funny)

webmaster404 (1148909) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253520)

Gives a new meaning of Blue Screen of Death then, when it crashes you die!

Which begs the question... (1)

monkeyboythom (796957) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253512)

Are those real?

I don't mean to sound callous, but . . . (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253514)

This is gonna sound worse than it is, by 2033, I'll be like 75 or something and probably dead from from all the Global Warming. And then there is that thing about December 21st, 2012 that's supposed to kill us all.

Heck, we might all be looking like overly cooked eggs by then anyway.

Or nearly frozen and living underground. My kids already don't know what a rotary phone is, have never seen a record player, and my grandkids probably won't ever have experienced analog TV.

Re:I don't mean to sound callous, but . . . (1)

SL Baur (19540) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255676)

And then there is that thing about December 21st, 2012 that's supposed to kill us all.
I don't know about that, but there's definitely the End Of time(2) As We Now Know It coming to the 32-bit world in January 2038.

PCs may disappear from your desk by 2033. (3, Funny)

verbalcontract (909922) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253546)

PCs may disappear from your desk by 2033 when the superintelligent robots vaporize your desk and everything underneath it.

there, fixed that for you.

And don't forget . . . (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253550)

Nano Technology - we'll probably be assimilated by then - CyBorgs R Us.

In the future there will be more lame predictions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253562)

Every time some tech site runs out of ideas, they throw up a dumb prediction piece, and it's always the same fucking thing: "the future will be like the present, only more so!" Fail.

25 years from now we will be too busy coping with the lack of cheap food, water, and energy, and the vast population of sick old people, to worry about how fucking long Google retains our search queries.

Did I say "fuck" enough? No? Okay. Fuck. Fuckity fuck.

Re:In the future there will be more lame predictio (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253676)

Fuck. Fuckity fuck.


Mr. Garrison: ::gasp:: Eric! Did you just say the "F" word??!?!?!?!
Cartman: What, Jew?

Re:In the future there will be more lame predictio (1)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254274)

Kyle: No, "fuck". You can't say "fuck" in school, you fuckin' fat-ass!

Re:In the future there will be more lame predictio (4, Interesting)

Ashtead (654610) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254012)

We'll be oke for food, but busy worrying about and fixing the Year 2038 bug [2038bug.com] which is due in another 5 years, when old 32-bit unix-family systems will set their clocks back to 1901.

Whatever happens (1)

rakuen (1230808) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253574)

Make sure that when given the opportunity, you take the red pill.

FAT Chance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253576)

Fat Chance. We'll be well into the Great Depression II before then if not World War III also. We'll be back to living in caves by then, if there is even anybody left.

Still waiting for date with Cheryl Woodward... (1)

IvyKing (732111) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253612)

Cheryl was one of the founding staff for PC World magazine (and PC Magazine before that) and a nice looking gal at the time. Scares me to realize that it has been 25 years since PC World started and even scarier that I bought my first copy of Byte 6 years before that...

We are living through history, folks (4, Interesting)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253642)

Seriously. Think about it. I'm 23 years old. My generation has lived through:

-Multiple, world-influencing major conflicts.
-The introduction, widespread distribution, and near-anywhere access of the Internet (which, in my opinion, is one of our greatest achievements as humans.)
-The rise of wireless mobile devices that have the potential to function anywhere in the world.
-Computers moving from universities and government orgs, taking up entire rooms, to becoming nearly universal in our homes, cars, and pockets.
-The rise of communication to the point where an actor can die in New York, and within ONE HOUR the entire world knowing of it (those parts of the world that has access to the net, radio, and/or TV of course)
-9/11 (one of the most world-changing events in modern history)

And many more. Seriously folks. We are living through one of the most exciting and important parts of history in the entire time-line of our species.

Centuries from now, people will be wondering "Imagine what it was like to live through the era where in roughly one century we went from taking weeks to get a message across a country and taking literally MONTHS to travel across the sea... to the point where you could talk to someone on the other side of the world using a device no bigger than your fist, and could travel from New York to Australia in a matter of hours."

And you know what? We are lucky enough to experience it first hand. Be grateful, folks. Someday, all of us will be the stuff of history and legend.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

WilyCoder (736280) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253776)

So full of optimism and joy, you must be young.

Oh...wait....

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253816)

Actually, I'm not full of optimism and joy...I feel that if we keep going down the path that we are, our species will be mostly eradicated within a hundred years. I also think that we will continue going down the path that we are.

But hey...if you can't hope for good things during bad times, when can you?

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253886)

At 23, Pojut has never used a rotary phone, probably never used a record player, doesn't know what leaded gas or a carburetor is, and probably has never seen a TV that didn't have a remote. Yeah, Pojut's young.

Re:We are living through history, folks (3, Insightful)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254016)

That's a pretty broad assumption. I'm 23 as well. I've used a rotary phone plenty, definitely used a record player, I know what leaded gas and carburetors are (even if they haven't exactly been every day fixtures for me, that doesn't mean I'm unaware of them), and I've definitely seen a TV without a remote.

Being young doesn't mean you lack knowledge of recent history.

Re:We are living through history, folks (2, Funny)

Atti K. (1169503) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254574)

I am 27. I used a rotary phone for many years, traveled a lot by cars powered with leaded gas, and watched cartoons on a black-and-white TV with no remote control for many years.

Oh, shit, wait, I live in Eastern Europe!

Re:We are living through history, folks (2, Interesting)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254576)

We had a rotary phone until I was ten. I have a Technics MK1200II hooked up to my sound system. My '64 Dodge Dart that I inherited from my dad has a carburetor on it that I myself rebuilt (along with the engine AND transmission...I was a mechanic between the ages of 18 and 22, and started working on cars when I was 12), as well as the '69 Chevelle and the '79 FJ-40 Land Cruiser that my step dad has (as well meaning they have carbs on them as well). Until my grandparents moved to Maryland from Pennsylvania, they actually had a TV that had a WIRED remote. Also, between the ages of 6 and 12, I had a 13" TV in my room that had rotating "loud-click" knobs on the front.

Keep assuming things.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254698)

I stand corrected, I thought rotary phones had left the US about 20 years ago for touch-tone. BTW does your Dart have a slant 6 in it?

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254642)

fun to add to list: mechanical typewriter, telephone party line, DDT, punched cards, punched tape, 8" floppy, vacuum tube tv & radios, metal electrician's fish (and thank god those aren't sold anymore), three speed bicycle

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254810)

Oh Geez, I completely forgot Punch Cards. I remember doing the entire high school's registration with punch cards and that thing was loud!

Then there were bell bottoms, modified VW Bugs, Metal Shop with real equipment, taking your rifle's to school and leaving them in the rifle rack until school let out so that you could get in some hunting for a couple of hours, calculators worn on the hips like cell phones, pocket protectors, OMG I could go on and on.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

uniquename72 (1169497) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255204)

My gf's 24 (I'm 35). When we started dating, she didn't know who Fonzi was :-(

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

Gibsnag (885901) | more than 6 years ago | (#22256292)

Uh, I'm 20 and I've used a rotary phone, used a record player and have a TV without a remote sitting downstairs right now.

Re:We are living through history, folks (4, Interesting)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253860)

Pish. My dad was born in 1924. He experienced the Great Depression, served in WWII, Korea, lived through Vietnam, riots, a massive increase in crime, saw technology enable us to break the sound barrier, vaporize cities, shrink a building-sized computer to a twelve-inch box, and land on the moon.

We're dwarfs.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

datablaster (999781) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255194)

I tend to agree with you: the generation born in the 20's and 30's experienced changes (and faced hardships) far deeper and more dramatic than any of the generations who followed.

Re:We are living through history, folks (3, Insightful)

fontkick (788075) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255524)

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

Re:We are living through history, folks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22256372)

Speak for yourself. I am a pygmy.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

WillRobinson (159226) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253960)

In your young life for sure, but look at the following from a bit err elder perspective:
-Multiple, world-influencing major conflicts.

To bad you missed several good wars, Viet Nam, WWII, WWI, I do not believe this one even compares in any facet to WWI or WWII as far as how much it reached every individual in the world.

-The introduction, widespread distribution, and near-anywhere access of the Internet (which, in my opinion, is one of our greatest achievements as humans.)

No indoor plumbing beats this hands down. (I do enjoy the net very much, was on back in 1988)


-The rise of wireless mobile devices that have the potential to function anywhere in the world.
-Computers moving from universities and government orgs, taking up entire rooms, to becoming nearly universal in our homes, cars, and pockets.
-The rise of communication to the point where an actor can die in New York, and within ONE HOUR the entire world knowing of it (those parts of the world that has access to the net, radio, and/or TV of course)


Ya neat play toys. Just remember, the internet and cheep communications also enabled your job to be off shored.


-9/11 (one of the most world-changing events in modern history)


Na, WWII

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

Knara (9377) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255112)

Yeah. I don't know if people really realize that outside the US 9/11 just resulted in everyone hoping that the US wasn't gonna throw a tantrum and invade them. Outside of the US, by and large, the "post-9/11 world" is very similar to the pre-9/11 world, warts and all.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255198)

-9/11 (one of the most world-changing events in modern history)

Na, WWII
To be fair, WWII was a series of events. Though several of them (Hitler invading Poland, Pearl Harbor, and the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki) rival or beat 9/11 in terms of how they changed the world.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

quest(answer)ion (894426) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254074)

Someday, all of us will be the stuff of history and legend.
and will we have some strange stories [xkcd.com] to tell.

Re:We are living through history, folks (4, Insightful)

RobBebop (947356) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254302)

"Imagine what it was like to live through the era where in roughly one century we went from taking weeks to get a message across a country and taking literally MONTHS to travel across the sea... to the point where you could talk to someone on the other side of the world using a device no bigger than your fist, and could travel from New York to Australia in a matter of hours."

Imagine what it was like to live through the era when Iron [wikipedia.org] was being developed that could slice right through the Bronze [wikipedia.org] that protected inferior armies... to the point where you could rape and pillage an entire village in under a week. You could march from Cairo to Rome in a matter of years and being conquering and conquering all along the way!

No, seriously. Technology in the future is going to be *way* cooler than it is now. You never reflect on what life was like for your grandparents before the automobile or refrigerators were standards for every family. Your grandchildren won't reflect on what life was like for you without the internet or the cell phone...

Re:We are living through history, folks (2, Interesting)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 6 years ago | (#22256102)

I actually have thought a lot about what life was like for my grandparents, and more importantly, asked them about it. My grandfather was born just after WWI, lived through the great depression, then fought in WWII. Having lived through that, the Korean war, the cold war, Vietnam, the Kennedy Assassination, the space program, the civil rights movement, the fall of the soviet union, and 9/11, I always believed that he lived through perhaps the most interesting time in history, and almost certainly saw the greatest change in everyday life of perhaps any generation. He once told me that when he was a child he remembers not having a telephone, electricity, a car, a refrigerator, or even a radio (they were quite poor during the depression). I still remember, a few years ago, showing him how to connect to the internet and search it with Google, and telling him he could find pretty much anything he ever wanted to look up with it.

I seriously doubt that in my lifetime I will see anywhere near the amount of revolutionary change that he saw in his.

The geek without a past (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#22256402)

You never reflect on what life was like for your grandparents before the automobile or refrigerators were standards for every family.

You do if you want to understand why some innovations see mass adoption and others do not. Your great-grandfather could walk down any middle class suburban street and feel perfectly at home. We do not build like The Jetsons.

Re:We are living through history, folks (2, Interesting)

DJ Jones (997846) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254306)

And a young person from 65 years ago would have said the same thing.

They would have seen -

- Advance of the assembly line and mass produced cheap automobiles
- An massive highway, rail and phone line system that allows information be spread globally within hours.
- Need I mention the television?
- They said Pearl Harbor changed the world too. And arguably more than 9/11 did for our time. You can't even compare Iraq to World War II.


Just think about it. Everyone thinks that of their own generation. It's all relative.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

blueturffan (867705) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254324)

23 years ago, I was using a Commodore 64, and a Commodore PET before that. I think the "computers taking up rooms" statement is a wee bit of an exaggeration.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

sams67 (880846) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254464)

"Someday, all of us will be the stuff of history and legend." According to some, that will be around about 2030. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technological_singularity [wikipedia.org]

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

Tribbin (565963) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254556)

And in these modern times, every man has seen movies of every fetish imaginable.

Re:We are living through history, folks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22254746)

-9/11 (one of the most world-changing events in modern history)


You probably think 9/11 is a world changing event for the wrong reasons. Even though it was a long time coming, 9/11 will only have speeded up America's fall as a world empire. Without 9/11, it could have been delayed at least 20 years or so, maybe even reversed.

Now, even the head accountant of the USA, the comptroller general, says we are bankrupt. When social security comes due to the baby boomer generation in full - you will see the collapse of our dollar. And the rise of China as the next superpower. Perhaps India.

Exciting times we do indeed live in. Will America go down with a fight or just fade away?

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

felipekk (1007591) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254836)

Seriously. Think about it. I'm 23 years old and from the year 2200. My generation has lived through:

-Multiple, universe-influencing major conflicts.
-The introduction, widespread distribution, and near-anywhere access of the Uninet (which, in my opinion, is one of our greatest achievements as humans.)
-The rise of instant interplanetary communications.
-Computers moving from being measured in inches to nanometers.
-The rise of communication to the point where an actor can die in Earth, and within ONE HOUR the entire universe knowing of it (those parts of the universe that are connected to the Uninet, of course).
-WWW3 (one of the most world-changing events in modern history)

And many more. Seriously folks. We are living through one of the most exciting and important parts of history in the entire time-line of our species.

And you know what? We are lucky enough to experience it first hand. Be grateful, folks. Someday, all of us will be the stuff of history and legend.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

Gauchito (657370) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254840)

Considering the looming likely catastrophes the world is going to go through soon (catastrophic climate change mainly, and all the goodies associated with it) I'd be surprised if anyone will bother remembering these last few golden decades. Might just be a psychological reaction to reading so much bad news, and seeing so little action to mitigate the pending disasters, but that also makes me feel it's unlikely there will be much remembering of history centuries from now by those few of us left.

I only wish I had learned more about these future events before I helped bring two other lives into this world. I cherish every moment I have with my kids, they are fantastic and wonderful parts of my life, but thinking about the future that's in store for them is usually paralyzing terrifying.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

B_un1t (942155) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255276)

Why do people assume that the air we breathe out is killing our environment? In my own observation, we're not headed to an early doom, the earth has healed itself time and again throughout history. Please think before taking THEORIES like Global Warming and assuming the worst end game imaginable. I admit there are data that point towards slight warming, but not to the point that it will consume the human race. Please consider why politicians are so adamant about this issue. MORE TAX DOLLARS FROM YOUR POCKET.

.. not so sure about 9/11, through ... (1)

Schtroumpf42 (1223878) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254980)

9/11 was NOT as significant an event as you think it was ... the decisive point, here, was the GW Bush election, which, IMHO, triggered the whole thing ... But let me paint you a clearer picture :
  • Massive fraud & election-system abuse : remember Diebold, and the funny (in a dark-humor way) thing about Southern States' lack of ballot recount ???
  • The whole thing about Iraq War : THEY DIDNT HAVE ANY weapons of mass destruction ... but, shortly after the American invasion, they were riddled with fragmentation bombs, Uranium-enriched ammo, scores of Hi-Tech tanks & furtive bombers, and so much more
  • Another thing about Iraq : they were armed and financed by the Bush administration (father's), through three-letters agenciesto fight against the Evil(tm) Iranians(R)
  • The so-called freedom that was supposed to be brought to those states (Iraq, Afghanistan, .., ??) is, I think, in a pretty WORSE shape than before Bush's (son) attacks .. but you should ask the Marines that routinely and actively die there for no reason other than those countries's underground, dark, oily substances
  • The blazingly fast erosion of civil rights, privacy, and, more generally, of all the freedoms brought by US's constitution : look for privacy international 2007 report .. covered here in late december ...
  • The world-wide spreading of the last point : it began in US, went on in Australia, pursued in United Kingdom, and is now spreading in France ...
  • REAL Journalists are an endangered specie : how many independant media do you know of, in your country ?? (hint : look at overall financial ties) ... for exemple, in France, I have to look for unbiased info in UK's news, or fringe newspapers ...
All things considered, I'd rather live in China rather than the US ... why ?
  1. at least, there, they dont pretend to be a Democracy (read Noam Chomsky for references)
  2. in a 60Millions-persons country (FR), with medias all repeating the same idea, they cant coax the population into voting for an European treaty
  3. in a 250Million-persons country (USA), with ads for terror-related propaganda, they cant legally make GWB the President
  4. So, with all those little points in mind, how would you rule a 1'200+ million-persons country (ZH, China)???
  5. Add to that the fact that China invented the most useful things in the world, such as Printing, the Compass, Silk, Tea, ... they still have a living religion that was born around the third millennium BC (hinting at the Shamanist knowledge embedded inside, such as Taiji Quan, Qi Gong, Acupuncture, ...). Also, they own one of the largest portion of American Treasury Bonds, and are those that make the Economy going on without (much) inflation !!!!


--
Check my other posts ... the picture will become even clearer ... and darker ...
Hopefully, the current economic, politic, social, and religious system is on the brink of collapse ... lets hope it will bring a more evenly distributed (and fair) economy and society ... (Africa, anyone ?)
Mayans (you know, one of the civilizations that Christianity stomped upon in the XVIth century) thought a lot about the second half of 12/2012, and modern science points that solar flares will kinda peak at that time, triggering all sorts of funny things, like geomagnetic storms, along with unstoppable gamma particles ...

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

Your Pal Dave (33229) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254984)

Nevermind that shit, you missed Disco!

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

xactuary (746078) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254988)

We are living through one of the most exciting and important parts of history in the entire time-line of our species.

Call it the Quickening, or the Singularity, it would seem that it will ever be so.

I was back home recently for a funeral and met a woman who had come to Nebraska as a child in a Conastoga Wagon and lived to fly in a jet, see a man on the moon, and, if she lives another year, seeing a (pick one: man of color/woman) elected president.

Re:We are living through history, folks (2, Insightful)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255118)

Seriously. Think about it. I'm 23 years old. My generation has lived through:

I'm 49 years old and MY generation has lived through the same. big deal. ALL generations live through history. It's what makes it history.

-Multiple, world-influencing major conflicts.

Like WW2? You lived through that one? I didn't either. Or Napoleon's conquest of Europe? I missed that one too. Oh, and the Aryan invasion of India. That was a biggie I missed out on too. Also: the Viking invasions of the 11th century. Nasty stuff. missed out on that butchery too.

-The introduction, widespread distribution, and near-anywhere access of the Internet (which, in my opinion, is one of our greatest achievements as humans.)

Yeah. That's a big one. kind of like THE TELEPHONE which laid the infrastructure that permitted the internet in the first place.

-The rise of wireless mobile devices that have the potential to function anywhere in the world.

That HAS THE POTENTIAL. whatever. Skip this one.

-Computers moving from universities and government orgs, taking up entire rooms, to becoming nearly universal in our homes, cars, and pockets.

Yeah. almost as big as the invention of AGRICULTURE.

-The rise of communication to the point where an actor can die in New York, and within ONE HOUR the entire world knowing of it (those parts of the world that has access to the net, radio, and/or TV of course)

Right. Like the death of an actor in NY is really such important news that it should be spread by this massive energy and resource intense global network, while IMPORTANT information is trivialised or buried by the same gossipy horseshit called "news", to the point where Real News is covered by COMEDIANS because the news organs have turned into little more than propaganda organs for the military industrial death machine.

-9/11 (one of the most world-changing events in modern history)

compared to WHAT? The USA incinerating hundreds of thousands of japanese CIVILIANS (you know - women and kids and pets and old folks and stuff) with ATOMIC WEAPONS? how is THAT not terrorism on a scale far beyond 9/11? Or the fire bombing of Tokyo? MacNamara himself said ON FILM that what he and LeMay did were WAR CRIMES. And speaking of that, what about events like Kristalnacht? Or Stalin's Purges and Pogroms? Yeah... We focus on 9/11 because we lived through it. But there's been much worse and things of far greater import and disaster than 9/11.

And many more. Seriously folks. We are living through one of the most exciting and important parts of history in the entire time-line of our species.

It's always exciting. I'm just concerned that we may be living at the end of the story, rather than the action packed middle chapters...

Centuries from now, people will be wondering "Imagine what it was like to live through the era where in roughly one century we went from taking weeks to get a message across a country and taking literally MONTHS to travel across the sea... to the point where you could talk to someone on the other side of the world using a device no bigger than your fist, and could travel from New York to Australia in a matter of hours."

And then they say "And because they were so stupid, greedy, selfish and destructive they pissed it all away on CRAP like Las Vegas and celebrity gossip magazines and mind numbing TV shows about nothing, we no longer have the ability to talk to someone on the other side of the world, because we spend most of our time as a society recovering from the die-off they drove themselves into, and now our planet's a furnace, the metals are gone or buried in landfills that are now underwater, the oil was used up in the 21st century, the coal vanished in the 22nd, and that's when the dying began in earnest. The information systems collapsed when the electrical grid became unstable and then disappeared. The last airplane flew in 2115, and it was more of a kite like the first plane. We stumble through a world that's dying. We've forgotten how to live in a solar agrarian way, so we have to reinvent everything, and our efforts are comical compared to the Renaissance. We hate the "golden Age" generations. Lazy stupid bastards. We have erased all their graves. Their books burned themselves from being so poorly made and on such high acid paper. The digital media is worthless, and their machines rusted out and rotted centuries ago. We hate them, and we curse them. Here in 2508, the world is a ruined depopulated hell hole. when one speaks of the twentieth century, one spits. When one speaks of the twenty first, one coughs. And when one speaks of the twenty second, a tear comes to the eye for the billions who died so sadly of war, disease, and starvation, all so needlessly. And they were warned - centuries in advance - and no one heeded the warnings. And here in te 26th century, we have to live in the mess left over. We are born, but we know we are cursed. We found a scrap of poetry from the late 20th century that described the late 21st and early 22nd century very well. It goes like this:

The car's on fire and there's no driver at the wheel.
and the sewers are all muddied with a thousand lonely suicides,
and a dark wind blows.
the government is corrupt and we're on so many drugs
with the radio on ad the curtains drawn.
We're trapped in the belly of this horrible machine
and the machine is bleeding to death.

The sun has fallen down
and the billboards are all leering
and the gflags are all dead at the top of their poles

it went like this:

the buildings toppled in on themselves
mothers clutching babies
as they pick through the rubble and pull out their hair
the skyline was beautiful on fire
all twisted metal stretched upwards
every washed in a thin orange haze

I said, "Kiss me, you're beautiful, these are truly the last days."

You grabbed my hand and we fell into it, like a day dream
or a fever.

We woke up one morning and fell a little further down
for sure this is the valley of death.
I open up my wallet
and it is full of blood.

RS

Re:We are living through history, folks (2, Insightful)

hackingbear (988354) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255176)

Well... I'm 36 and during my times,
  • There are still a billion people on hunger, as it used to be
  • There are still millions of people have no health care, as it used to be
  • There are still millions of illiterate people, as it used to be
  • Forests are still being cut at rapid pace, as it used to be
  • Rich people get richer than they used to be
Nothing has really changed. Maybe you are still too young.

Re:We are living through history, folks (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255312)

Imagine what it was like to live through the era where in roughly one century we went from taking weeks to get a message across a country... to the point where you could talk to someone on the other side of the world using a device no bigger than your fist

You know, they've had telegraphs for about 150 years now.

Computer implants present great privacy threat (2, Interesting)

Eravnrekaree (467752) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253720)

I do not foresee the PC going away. The device is just too useful and common sense. Having a monitor on your desk and a keyboard is practical and its not something that is going to become obsolete.

I would be very concerned about the privacy and human rights implications of putting computers or chip implants into peoples bodies. This is the perfect vehicle for total electronic surviellance of a population, and perhaps even more nefarious purposes. For instance it might be possible for a clandestine purpose, or for "law enforcement" purposes to put circuits in these implants that could deliver an electric shock, cause pain or disable a person. The human rights implications and the threats to basic freedom that this would entail would be very dire and serious.

Technology is great on your desk or in your PDA device. It is nice to be able to browse the internet and access and share information through the internet via computer. But this technology should work for our benefit and also be used to promote freedom, not take it away. People must have complete control over their computers, and should be able to put it to use how they see fit. This is the idea of a general purpose computer. DRM indeed is a serious threat to the freedom of the consumer, the freedom to tinker and to utilise technology in new and innovative ways. Closed platforms such as game consoles are designed to limit how they can be used, so that instead of you being able to use your computer as you see fit, some large corporation controls the system and what you can use it for. Putting implants into peoples bodies raises far too much concern for abuse, the the risk or danger to freedom and to control this technology is too great. Once you put electronic devices into the body for these kinds of things, the potential for this to be abused and to be used against you increases exponentially. At least a person should have a choice to refuse this sort of technology. We need to be very wary of schemes to try to forcibly implant people with chips, especially children, and the issues this would create to various bodily integrity and human rights issues, and would also lead us towards a world where no one has any privacy or rights at all, a 1984 like society where everything someone does can be controlled and scrutinised. People should have a basic right to not have their body implanted with electronic devices, tracking devices, etc, which can be used against them. No matter what gaurantee a manufacturer of such technology makes, there is always the opportunity and chance that some technology which you may not be told is there can be embedded into these devices, for tracking or monitoring persons, or as a control measure through some sort of electroshock feature for instance. It is impossible to verify from the consumers end that this technology is not present in such devices. They present a very serious danger and threat to human rights, freedom and privacy.

In the future, ideally I see the desktop computer remaining very commonplace. Computer processing power will continue to increase which will improve game performance, rollout of fiber optic networks will allow for more high bandwidth applications such as instant movie downloading, and so on. Linux will eventually become dominate and totally replace windows, which will give consumers vastly increased freedom and control over their computers than ever before. Just keep the computers on your desk and in your pocket, not in your body and we can use them as a tool of freedom and for our own benefit and to use them as we wish, rather than as a tool of survellience and enslavement.

Plug me in Scotty. (1)

headkase (533448) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253732)

I don't care what happens as long as I can get a plug in my head an IV in my arm and never come back to a reality where I can't fly at will. Oh yeah, and Unicorns.

Rainbow's End (1)

Farakin (1101889) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253756)

someone here mentioned and I read it, and I gotta say it is pretty visionistic. I made that word up by the way.

I doubt it (1)

LM741N (258038) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253850)

My 1950's World Book Encyclopedia claimed that by the year 2000 robots would be doing all the work and everybody would have complete leisure. They forgot that leisure doesn't come with a paycheck.

So I am skeptical of pie in the sky predictions about technology.

Re: I doubt it (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253944)

Remember Popular Science? Back in the 60's & 70's they were sayin' we were all gonna be driving in wheel-less flying cars and houses made of plastic and eating food that was replicated or some such nonsense.

So does that mean (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22253934)

That I can download porn directly into my brain?

I'm sorry Dave (1)

imgod2u (812837) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253964)

I cannot let you do that.

um yes? (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253986)

If desktop computers die then nothing will remain but proprietary devices needing to be hacked. Without build it yourself devices life would really suck.

2033 (4, Funny)

hawks5999 (588198) | more than 6 years ago | (#22253994)

The Year of Linux on the Desktop!

inovation is over, for now (2, Interesting)

nirvash (1002781) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254022)

I feel like theres no technology that can be invented in the next 20 years that can revolutionize our lives. we are so advanced in tech that so far the only thing left is to do small increments to current tech. i dont think that a computer thats 100 times more powerful and smaller than your thumb can change the lives of to many peoples. things like the matrix interface or true ai are the true innovations that i am waiting to come. not a powerful pc or tv with the size of a wall.

Re:inovation is over, for now (1)

ChefInnocent (667809) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254904)

You might feel that way, but look at the cell phone or the ATM. 20 years ago, only the weathly had cell phones, and they didn't work very well. Today, most people have one, and they are getting better all the time. 20 years ago, the ATM existed, but few used it. Today, we now use debit cards, and few bemoan the loss of paper currency. I expect there is something that is currently in its infancy that will revolutionize our culture. 20 years from now, I hope my toilet and refridgerator collude to provide me a healthier diet.

Cochlear device vs. brain on net action. (1)

Gat0r30y (957941) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254150)

"There's a very short leap between implanting a [cochlear] device and one that lets you receive data directly from the Net,"

Gives a new meaning to getting worms!
or to catching a virus.
and generally seems a little more intrusive than a cochlear implant. None the less, if the pr0n industry can take advantage of this, I'm sure it will be ubiquitous.

If they had asked me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22254310)

Leonard Nimoy, nude and in character

OS/2 will still be dead. :-) (2, Funny)

Richard Steiner (1585) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254440)

...but some of us will still find an excuse or three to run it under emulation. :-) :-)

Or maybe my PPro will still be working in 2033? Who knows? :-)

Stupid Laws and Rules (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254774)

I'm waiting for all the stupid laws and rules about "no cameras or recording devices (for the mob)" collide with people whose bodies are recording devices due to advances in the use of technology to assist and augment people with sensory handicaps. Why shouldn't I be able to take advantage of modern technology to correct and enhance my vision?

Networking, thin client (1)

gilesjuk (604902) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254940)

As wireless networking speeds up it will be possible to carry smaller less powerful devices that merely act as clients for your home and work computer.

This will mean more dedicated hardware which uses less power, you won't need any storage on the move or vast amounts of processing power.

It may also mean that TV, phone and other services you have at home would merely be redirected to your portable viewer.

This is all fairly possible now, the main problem is speed and lack of a dedicated portable terminal.

Cloning needs to be banned. (2, Informative)

Eravnrekaree (467752) | more than 6 years ago | (#22254986)

The way I see it, and this comes not from a religious viewpoint since I am not religious, but a human rights one, is no one else has a right to impose on another person their wishes about their body, including deciding what kind of body that person will have. Every person should have a right to a body that is uniquely theres and no one elses and no one should have a right to force them into someone else's body. At least nature is random and has no agenda. People have agendas and I do not like the idea of people deciding what kind of body a person will have, their facial features, their eye color, etc. People have a right to eb unique and to have things which are uniquely their own and which no one else has control over and the most basic of this is their body. Perhaps people choose their own DNA before they are born, including their phsyical features and characteristics.

Human cloning has a very concerning and unpleasant 1984ish or Brave New World feel to it, a horrific utopian world where every aspect of peoples lives, right down to that which is most personal and sacred to a person, their body, is controlled by others. It is a frightening vision of conformity, uniformity where people are rather than seen as unique individuals instead as carbon copies. It really needs to be completely banned if we care about freedom, the right of each person to be individual, unique, to self determination, the right to a body that is uniquely theres and controlled and manipulated by no one else. We need to respect each person as a unique and diverse person entirely their own, rather than trying to impose ourselves on them and try to determine and control who they are. We need to respect diversity and individuality and eschew totalitarianism and conformism. So I concur with the pope on cloning, not on religious grounds, but on human rights ones.

Re:Cloning needs to be banned. (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255256)

Every person should have a right to a body that is uniquely theres [sic] and no one elses
Identical twins would tend to disagree.

Next 25 years, same as the last. (1)

rmerry72 (934528) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255010)

Didn't we get the same predicitons in 1990? Wasn't Larry (head honcho of Oracle) spouting the same "network computer" idea back then? Hasn't SciFi been predicting such things for more than 50 years?

Slow news day. For all those 30 or younger: Nothing much as happened in the last decade. No new tech, just small advances in existing tech. There are no ground breaking advances that will be happening in the next decade cause the population is too slow to adopt.

It took 25 years after its invention and promotion for TV to reach acceptance by the public largely because for an entire generation (an a war or two) radio was "good enough and who wants anything else?" Is surround sound really so different from quadraphonic (circa 1978)? Nope.

Most of the good ideas from the 1980s and 1990s won't be accepted by the mainstream until 2010s and 2020s if at all. So the next 25 years, will be the same stuff the tech industry has been pushing for the last, just with fancy new marketing names.

2008 really is the same as 1998, just with more noise, less convenience and more expense. Can't wait for 2018 :-(

PC's? Not likely. Desktop Comps, most definately (1)

r_jensen11 (598210) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255504)

Of all places, /. frequenters should know that there is a dramatic difference between the terms PC and Desktop Computer.

I would not be surprised if the personal computer changes dramatically in the next 10 years. Already, we have laptops that are more than powerful enough for all desktop computer needs. I'm foreseeing the desktop market share becoming dismally small within 5 years (for sales, there's still going to be tons of desktops that are still running). Everyone that can't get what they need done on a laptop is going to be using a workstation. Servers and mainframes, well who knows, other than that they're going to perform a role more important than they do now, probably returning to similar importance that they did decades ago.

It must be BS day on /. (1)

Fat Wang (1230914) | more than 6 years ago | (#22255618)

Where did the year 2033 come from? Just because there are more embedded electronics in devices these days, doesn't mean people are going to give up the power obtained from a big box sitting underneath (or on, or wherever) a desk. Then add the post about no LAN in the future. There will always be a need and application for a LAN.

Web 3.0, Web 4.0, Web 5.0,....Web 25.0 (1)

heroine (1220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22256526)

Venture capitalists aren't very creative.
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