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Egypt Calls for Bandwidth Rationing

Soulskill posted more than 6 years ago | from the stay-away-from-youtube dept.

The Internet 182

I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "Egypt's Ministry of Communications and Information Technology has called upon its citizens to ration their internet usage. This comes after two of its three undersea fiber optic links were recently severed. The cut cables have caused communication difficulties for millions of people throughout the Middle East. Ministry spokesman Mohammed Taymur was quoted as saying, 'People should know how to use the Internet because people who download music and films are going to affect businesses who have more important things to do.'"

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These cables were cut on purpose (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258696)

The cables in the mideast have all been cut on purpose. When they were first laid out, we did not have as good interception equipment as is now available. However, going down and installing equipment capable of intercepting, duplicating, and analyzing their traffic without increasing latency in the slightest would require an unexplained interruption in service while it was being installed. While the lines are being repaired, further up in a difficult-to-reach location or hub, the NSA is now installing this equipment. Afterwards, they can copy all data sent through the cable without raising any eyebrows. There will be no proof.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (4, Interesting)

darkmeridian (119044) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258860)

There's no need to do that with these cables. They have at end somewhere, right? So what the NSA/bad guys do is to tap the ends of the wires. The ISP sometimes helps.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (5, Funny)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258980)

That would leave proof, and that would totally ruin the fun of coming up with some elaborate baseless conspiracy theory. What good is a conspiracy theory if there's a way to disprove it that doesn't require a submarine?

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (4, Funny)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259002)

Are you seriously saying a Chinese mini-sub didn't kidnap an Australian prime minister?

Harold Holt would be turning in his grave.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259106)

What kind of a lame attempt was this?
It was Hagbard Celine [wikipedia.org] in the golden submarine with a glitch in FUCKUP [wikipedia.org] that can only be described as self-referential.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (3, Funny)

s74ng3r (963541) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259114)

Well, for submarines, maybe no. But if your conspiracy theory involved something like sharks with freakin lasers, now that's a conspiracy. :)

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

Zymergy (803632) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259198)

The US is most likely using its Nuclear Submarines (USS Jimmy Carter, et al) for something other than mere 'deterrence'. Cool.
We read about this here before:
http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=01/05/23/2142216 [slashdot.org] and
http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=00/11/20/235216 [slashdot.org]
http://www.google.com/search?num=50&hl=en&safe=off&q=US+Submarine+cable+tapping&btnG=Search [google.com]

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259256)

Nuclear submarine refers to the propulsion, the ones for deterrence are the SSBNs which carry nuclear missiles. It'd be pointless to send one with missiles to do infiltration jobs, subs without missile launchers are smaller and probably less trouble if they hit a rock and sink.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

The_reformant (777653) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259850)

Ok well here's one for you there are 2 stories on the frontpage posted by soulskill with I dont beleive in imaginary property as the submitter. These are both linked to Iwouldn'tsteal.net . A quick whois revelas this is registered by Lasse Nilsson of Oderland Webbhotell AB. Make of that what you will.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259014)

Whose to say it was the NSA? Maybe it was Islamic fundamentalists cutting the cable because they did not want their countryment access to western influences?

It would seem that previous history of the NSA indicates their desire for no detection, as compared to an obvious interrruption.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259120)

Y'all hush!
If at first you can't stay out of the conversation, then at least ensure the opposition estimate of capabilities is way off.
Remember: the NSA are bumbling fools that couldn't lead two nuns in one minute of silent prayer.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259152)

Or maybe it was Dolphins just playing a joke... or maybe... you guessed it... sharks with lasers...

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (3, Funny)

Petersson (636253) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259702)

Or maybe it was Dolphins just playing a joke

As in 'So long, and thanks for all the fiber'?

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259592)

I think you're right. I have drawn a nice editorial cartoon of the prophet Muhammad slicing through the cable with his fork shaped tongue. Hope I can get it published.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

Nocterro (648910) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259016)

Wasn't there some article a while back about sniffing fiber optics by bending the cable to a certain extent (or something)?
In any case, I suspect assuming you know what security agencies can do is like assuming you know what will happen tomorrow; probably fairly close but never 100%, and always the possibility of something drastically different.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

digitalchinky (650880) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259654)

While you didn't say this - someone a couple of posts above you did. "Remember: the NSA are bumbling fools that couldn't lead two nuns in one minute of silent prayer" Speaking as a disgruntled ex 3 letter agency drone, I have to say that the conspiracy theories make for good movies, books, drunken late night stories, and that is all they do.

It's not necessary to make any assumptions, just a little critical and rational thinking will get you 90% of the way. Is it possible is a better question. Could a 3 letter agency have a large black tube that wraps around a bit of fiber and soaks up the noise of strained photons losing some energy by banging around a sharp bend? Does anything remotely similar exist in the commercial world? Have any physicists ever published papers on the subject? Can I buy a kit to do the same thing from radio shack yet?

Surprisingly, google, along with much corporate salivation at huge gravy train government contracts, has resulted in a lot of product specifications becoming well within easy reach of the comfort of ones computer. People don't keep secrets very well.

New and non-conforming will easily buy you a few years in the world of government bureaucracy and the child like stupidity of upper level managers. Always.

Wednesday - MI5 complain ; Thursday - cables cut (5, Interesting)

evilandi (2800) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259026)

Re:Wednesday - MI5 complain ; Thursday - cables cu (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259746)

Friday - I'm in love.

Re:Wednesday - MI5 complain ; Thursday - cables cu (1)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259754)

Ah, but you see, that's how the Zionist Space Lizards operate! That's why the 9/11 "truth" retards can, with a straight face, claim that the Project for a New American Century published a report containing their plans for global domination, as well as their intention to carry out the 9/11 attacks. Because, as we all know, the NWO always publish all their evil plans on the internet before they actually carry them out.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

Fatal67 (244371) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259042)

Pretty sure that was the main plot of one of Tom Clancy's book.

No Doubt (1)

CranberryKing (776846) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259058)

The NSA being a simplification. I believe an Int-Er-Na-tional Conspiracy is at work. But I can't be sure..

What a huge undertaking. Thank god I'm not on that project. Good work if you can get it, I guess. A boondoggle.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (4, Insightful)

Erpo (237853) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259084)

If that is how you feel, you should be encrypting sensitive information. There is never a guarantee that someone isn't looking at information you send in the clear over the Internet.

These conspiracies were posted on purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259108)

Gee a conspiracy post marked as interesting instead of -1:tabloid. Sure puts my faith in the citizen press movement.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (3, Funny)

muzicman (1148101) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259356)

Have you been seeing black helicoptors since you have written this post? You do realise that just because you are paranoid, doen't mean their not out to get you!

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

phillct (157409) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259400)

Hey, that's completely plausible. The ship explanation that's been offered is probably true. When you're in the middle of the ocean, generally there's a ship involved (or a movie starring Tom Hanks). I hope for the sake of irony it was a cargo ship full of OEM Vista upgrades headed for their customer service centers in India. On that subject, isn't the writing on the wall a bit here? I'm a US based programmer, I happen to be a citizen, but regardless I'm authorized to work here and I live here. Thus, anything that demonstrates that off-shoring anything is scary, especially technology, is a fan of mine. The cable will falter again. Whether it's perceived as a conspiracy to invade privacy, a true accident, or corporate espionage, it will chip away at the confidence of those who believe one can rely on other nations to deliver one's technology solutions, from blogs to finance to the business of war. Having said that, my heard does bleed; I hope the citizens of all affected countries get the bandwidth they deserve, albeit, I hope it's overwhelmingly downstream bandwidth they're using when routing through the network to the US.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259404)

Well , the sub-hoe (relative of backhoe), Jimmy Carter is, now. The harbourmaster has a map of no-go zones, and where cables, and other hazards are. This is no 'accident'. If the satellite photos were good enough, may be able to see things clearer.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

Wylfing (144940) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259628)

Mynocks.

Re:These cables were cut on purpose (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259916)

Except there's no need to cut a wire in order to tap it. Ever heard of induction?

rofl (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258698)

ROFL

Yeah (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258704)

Like read Slashdot :).

Business more important than my porn? NO! (4, Insightful)

node159 (636992) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258706)

One would think that those businesses affected who depend on their network connection would see its value and have the appropriate SLA. Otherwise they should fall under the rest who need to fight over the limited data cause by a lack of investment of inferstructure. I have no sympathy, if line failure means a reduced capacity, that isn't a backup.

God talking heads piss me off some times. Get a clue.

Re:Business more important than my porn? NO! (2, Informative)

klingens (147173) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258760)

The (possible) SLAs are exactly the point: chances are, the telecommunications company, and probably the cable too, is directly owned by the government. This is a usual arrangement in most islamic countries so any payout or loss of revenue due SLAs is directly hurting the government of which this minister is an officer.

Re:Business more important than my porn? NO! (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259752)

The trouble with that thought is that there are companies that know a cable cut could hurt them, but there are no viable alternatives in the event of a cable cut. Does anyone remember when one of the comms satellites went missing? If they had bought dishes that can be pointed remotely, there was a standby bird, everyone else had to visit all their sites to repoint dishes.

In this case, say you are a large ISP, what do you do? Especially if your connection is provided by the government, and mandated by law? Even though it seems tin foil hattish, I'm with the people that don't think this is an accident.

Backups not always efficient (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259822)

By definition, having a redundant backup system means inefficient use of systems. When there's an infinite demand, such as there is with bandwidth, this means there's no point in having backup links at the same high capacity. Instead, what you do is guarantee some minimum access and a good coping/recovery strategy. Seems that the good strategy is the part missing in this case.

Re:Business more important than my porn? NO! (1)

pla (258480) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259848)

Business more important than my porn? NO!

Y'know, at first I thought the same thing - Where the hell does this guy get off telling people not to use the net so oh-so-special "business" users can have priority access to bandwidth?

Then on thinking about it a bit deeper - That really does make sense, and not just for the "screw you, I pay for it too and will damned well use it" reason.

Without Aziz Sixpack using the net, these businesses have no use for it. "The Internet" doesn't magically equal profit (or so I thought we all learned from the dot com bubble bursting). It can help your paying customers get to your products and services easier, but without those customers, the net by itself does nothing at all for you.



God talking heads piss me off some times. Get a clue.

Ditto. "Utterance of official stupidity" should count as a crime punishable by death.

No more pr0n (0)

Ours (596171) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258716)

No more pr0n for Egypt. Or 2-6 pics per person per day. Poor chaps.

Re:No more pr0n (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258772)

They'll just have to share ;-)

Re:No more pr0n (4, Funny)

Loke the Dog (1054294) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258788)

If they don't keep a stored reserve for emergencies like this, they deserve to be frustrated. With HDDs so cheap these days, there's no excuse for not having a few gigs of porn.

Re:No more pr0n (4, Interesting)

eiapoce (1049910) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258824)

No more pr0n for Egypt. Or 2-6 pics per person per day. Poor chaps.
You didn't mean PORN, you meant SEX!

That's accordin to google labs, porn is for UK, New Zealand and Australia where getting sex isn't a problem while sofisticated porn is difficult to see http://www.google.com/trends?q=porn&ctab=0&geo=all&date=all&sort=0 [google.com] - Sex is clearly what Egiptians are looking for http://www.google.com/trends?q=sex&ctab=0&geo=all&date=all&sort=0 [google.com]

Re:No more pr0n (3, Interesting)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258998)

This might be a more useful comparison. This plot of porn and sex, ranked by sex, shows the countries that are most affected.

And yes, Egypt ranks first, followed by India.

http://www.google.com/trends?q=porn%2C+sex&ctab=0&geo=all&geor=all&date=all&sort=1 [google.com]

Re:No more pr0n (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259652)

that is true , even reserved gigs of sex have been depleted..now we are having riots in the streets by porn-addicts looking after "natural" sex pics , poor we are! help us and send us porn-filled-HDD by planes I say , it is worse than what happened in Katrina!

Who is it more important to? (1, Insightful)

hoojus (935220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258728)

I think it is pathetic to say that big business internet usage is more important than that of a home user. I for one work from home and my internet usage is closely tied to my pay. So to me it is definitely more important that corporate office people sending chain emails.

I do admit that the curbing of music downloading for personal use may be helpful... but there are musicians who require this for their income as well.

No way I would drop my usage at all.

Re:Who is it more important to? (1)

siyavash (677724) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258756)

hm... your internet connection IS for business use if you work from home... :)

Re:Who is it more important to? (1)

EvilGrin5000 (951851) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258790)

I think you're missing the point.
Your examples are actually using home-based businesses (work from home, musicians doing whatever). So I think you actually proved my point that if your usage is required for work or for something you personally need, then by all means, go ahead and do it! They simply appealed to the public's common sense to hold off on the big media downloads for a few days.

Re:Who is it more important to? (4, Interesting)

hoojus (935220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258870)

appealed to the public's common sense
Never heard of this what is it? Even so just because the public are using it for entertainment purposes this is no less important than business use. If these people are paying the same amount then they should have equal use. If business are paying more and the contracts (to ISPs) specify selective throttling then I have no problem. But I know that my ISP has no signed contract with me that allows them to put other customer's needs before mine. Make no mistake whether big business or home user they are both customers and should be treated equally.

Re:Who is it more important to? (3, Insightful)

QuickFox (311231) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259080)

appealed to the public's common sense
Never heard of this what is it?
Why are Americans so parochial? Just because the public in the US has no common sense doesn't mean it's the the same in the rest of the world.

Re:Who is it more important to? (1)

hoojus (935220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259370)

I am not an American so I get to ignore that one :) It was also said tongue in cheek.

Re:Who is it more important to? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259478)

Well if you work on a so-called "global" team. You get to find this out first-hand. Americans are perhaps not the most common-sensical people on the planet, but they certainly have second place.

Middle east is simple : you do what your dad does. If he was a nobel laureate and you failed kindergarten, you head the university. Needless to say, this arrangement has it's problems. Never ask anyone in Egypt why they have a job. They are very open about this you know.

In kuwait the "senior technical designer" of the local telco did not know what a router was. "how do I recognize one ?" - no joke. And I had to explain to the last pakistani that called that just connecting your pc to an -unconnected- router is not going to get you on the internet. Then we got started on bgp. Needless to say, it took a while.

Re:Who is it more important to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259766)

Sorry. Speaking as a Canadian who has been to various places in Western Europe (and is capable of watching BBC Newsworld) ... yes, a deficiency of common sense is a HUMAN TRAIT not an American one. People often do things against their own interests because they're too pre-occupied to look 5 minutes down the road (so to speak, though it's also true literally).

Sure, you could continue torrenting, or the business you work for could have VoIP access to continue doing business... Hmm, I wonder which the individual would choose ...

Oh and while I'm ranting, Look Ottawa, I know you love your Senators, but you don't have to drive like fucking lunatics just because it's a game night. All my way home (driving east no less) last night was plagued with jackasses running lights, cutting people off, tailgating, etc. Christ, it's just hockey [and they played miserably anyways!].

Captcha: Loosely. As in my rant is loosely on topic.

lol (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259770)

the day any of the world has common sense is the same day we don't read/hear about starvation and bombing.

until keep living under the delusion that somewhere else is better than some other place

Re:Who is it more important to? (4, Interesting)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259372)

But I know that my ISP has no signed contract with me that allows them to put other customer's needs before mine. Make no mistake whether big business or home user they are both customers and should be treated equally.

Good luck with that.

A year ago some cables running south of Taiwan were cut by an earthquake. In Hong Kong the immediate effect was to slow down access. But a few hours later, they had reconfigured it so that domestic users, like myself, working at home, got ZERO connectivity, as they gave almost all the capacity to their business clients. I couldn't even check my email, on Yahoo, for a week. And you know that businesses were just sending the same bloated powerpoint files and videos to each other.

IMHO, they should give a minimum connectivity to everyone so you can use email, the most vital of all services. But when they have their big customers screaming at them about how slow their service is, they'll cheerfully cut off home users completely, knowing most have no alternative.

Re:Who is it more important to? (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259712)

But I know that my ISP has no signed contract with me that allows them to put other customer's needs before mine.
Does your contract with them actaully gaurantee anything? If so then you are almost certainly on a buisness class connection. If not get ready to be ignored when the crunch comes.

"More important things to do" (1)

Wiseman1024 (993899) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258732)

Who's that guy to say what's more important to do? Porn and fansubs are more important than business to me, and I'm a citizen as good as and equal in rights to any businessmen. That idiot would like to hear about the series of tubes.

Re:"More important things to do" (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258858)

That's a stupid and ignorant view. Those companies might seriously rely on their Internet connections for business, which helps the economy (could be small or big business). They're actually contributing something to the society - you jerking off however to some fansubs isn't, so society doesn't really care.

Just like with the power outage on the East coast in North America, in times of temporary resource shortage, it is expected that everyone try to help out so that society as a whole does better.

Otherwise, while your jerking off to your fansubs, the local economy might experience some serious problems.

However, that's not to say that the premise of bandwidth "rationing" itself is ignorant - if this was a truly serious emergency, the government could step in and allocate a certain amount of bandwidth to business. Or they could pass some legislation to force ISPs to start throttling users who are using too much bandwidth during peak times.

doomed to fail (1)

IKILLEDTROTSKY (1197753) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258746)

If they start telling everyone there is a shortage then they will start hording, soon they'll have old ladys with 323 gigs of Murder She Wrote and Matlock.

Re:doomed to fail (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259266)

If they start telling everyone there is a shortage then they will start hording, soon they'll have old ladys with 323 gigs of Murder She Wrote and Matlock.
But if they start telling everyone "No, there is absolutely no shortage, that's unpossible" it will be much worse.

A-ha - I smell a new *aa strategy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258750)

'People should know how to use the Internet because people who download music and films are going to affect businesses who have more important things to do.'

Uh-huh...

Let the market sort it out.. (0)

WarwickRyan (780794) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258758)

Give everyone a basic cap, then let the rest of the bandwidth go to the highest bidder.

Internet the new water food and shelter... (4, Interesting)

psychicsword (1036852) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258762)

It seems that Internet is now making its way up with water food and shelter for human necessities :P

Re:Internet the new water food and shelter... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258894)

It would be funny ten years ago, but communications and business infrastructure depend on internet(in the developed world, not Egypt).Its like cutting off the phone network in 1997.

Re:Internet the new water food and shelter... (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259186)

Food, shelter, communication. It's the new primary form of communication when people aren't in the same room.

Re:Internet the new water food and shelter... (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259440)

I can just imagine the ads we are going to see on TV... images of fat Egyptians sitting at their computer screens with 'taking too long to respond' messages on their browsers. A voice-over asking us to please donate all our unused bandwidth to these poor unfortunately souls... cut to one of the previously shown Egyptian kid, in a cold sweat with a crazed look in his eyes, talking about how much he has suffered in the 48 hours that he's been unable to update his facebook site.

Seriously though, are any of the countries that call centers and programming are commonly outsourced to being affected? And how much?

I see it already... (4, Funny)

thrill12 (711899) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258768)

... next thing they do is giving away "bandwidth-stamps".
I am sorry sir, your bandwidth-card is full ; you will have to wait until next month to renew your bandwidth.
Here you go ma'm, one bandwidth stamp for 100 MB worth of data.
Sir, you are hereby under arrest for trying to fraud with bandwidth-cards, you sir are a "bandwidth pirate", a "megabyte thief", a "bit ripper" !

Egypt Slashdoted... (0)

psychicsword (1036852) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258786)

Looks like Egypt just got Slashdoted the WHOLE COUNTRY went down.

Adding to the problem... (5, Funny)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258798)

Though I've never looked for an Egyptian site before, my curiousity may have added a little to the problem:

The server at www.egypt.gov.eg is taking too long to respond.

Re:Adding to the problem... (1)

nfractal (1039722) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258836)

Why'd you ever post this ??
I <i>HAD</i> to try it now ....

<b>The server at www.egypt.gov.eg is taking too long to respond.</b>

Sometimes I hate myself :(

Re:Adding to the problem... (5, Funny)

The One and Only (691315) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258896)

Have we ever slashdotted an entire country before?

Re:Adding to the problem... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259510)

Well, I do remember an article about Sealand (a "country" that's an abandoned oil platform outside the UK) which was planning on setting up some sort of data center outside traditional states. That was completely slashdotted, but I don't remember if it actually went over their link or if it was just some hosting provider onshore.

Yes (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259880)

Tuvalu was probably slashdotted a long time ago.

Re:Adding to the problem... (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259892)

I got the title, here it is:

Helpful, isn't it?

Same Story (1)

nfractal (1039722) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258814)

Here's the oft repeated story again, instead of trying to improve infrastructure and services (like backup lines for instance) the consumers are the ones left holding the bag. In fact they're already using the word 'rationing'. Why is it that almost always its the consumers who bear the burden of whatever boo boo's made by the service providers ?
On the other hand though the statement is worded unsurprisingly inept, i guess the sentiment here might be to take stock of the usage and avoiding unnecessary bandwidth hogging for a while. Though what's unnecessary should be left to the consumers to define for themselves.
A simple request for 'help' and 'understanding' would have been more useful without generating all the negative publicity that I'm sure this will generate.
shucks ..

nf

Re:Same Story (5, Interesting)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258908)

Here's the oft repeated story again, instead of trying to improve infrastructure and services (like backup lines for instance) the consumers are the ones left holding the bag. In fact they're already using the word 'rationing'. Why is it that almost always its the consumers who bear the burden of whatever boo boo's made by the service providers ?

This isn't a private company, it's the entire country's connection to the rest of the world. As in, the government. And there are redundancies, that's why they can still connect. Two of the three main cables (each over a mile apart) failed simultanously.

On the other hand though the statement is worded unsurprisingly inept, i guess the sentiment here might be to take stock of the usage and avoiding unnecessary bandwidth hogging for a while. Though what's unnecessary should be left to the consumers to define for themselves. A simple request for 'help' and 'understanding' would have been more useful without generating all the negative publicity that I'm sure this will generate.

That's pretty much what they did. They said there was limited bandwidth, and asked people not to download music and movies because it would eat up bandwidth that might be needed for contining business purposes.

If you read all his comments, it is quite polite and understanding of individuals' rights. You might not think it was polite because it was translated from Arabic. Egypt is a different country than the United States. Many other countries speak languages besides English.

self regulating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259522)

Surely many downloaders will know or soon realise that downloads are going to be slow and unreliable and will hold off downloading for a few days. I often find my ISP is slow at times and will try downloading a few hours later, I suspect the same will happen here.

In other news... (-1, Flamebait)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258822)

Egyptian sales of bikinis, tanning lotions and Vaseline intensive care are through the roof.

Next up... (2, Interesting)

Icarium (1109647) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258840)

...they'll be asking road users to give way to trucks and business executives on the roads.

Thier concern over how this could impact thier commerce is understandable, but this is not the answer.

Re:Next up... (5, Insightful)

Zorque (894011) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258918)

All it's asking is that people try and refrain from heavy downloading (music, movies, etc) for a little while until the lines are fixed. They're not asking people to give up the internet entirely. It would be pretty stupid of them to have a large portion of their economy collapse just so people could torrent.

Re:Next up... (2, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259718)

Hey, Ibrahim, how's our bandwidth demand? Sharply down, you say? So, our expenditure is down as well, right? And our revenue? Still constant. Hmm.

Say, Ibrahim, about those cables. If you felt like taking some vacation time before fixing them, that'd be OK with me. See you in April.

Re:Next up... (1)

cornicefire (610241) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259886)

Oh come on. Downloading free music is a human right! Don't you care about fair use? Eeewwwww. You make me sick.

It happens (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258942)

they'll be asking road users to give way to trucks

I can't remember who told me this but apparently they were in Egypt and asked the hotel people where they could go to rent a car and look around for a bit in the evening and they were told no way to you do that because big trucks drive around at night and nobody makes them use lights.

Closer to home (for me) I was in Tasmania, which is the most redneck state in Australia. They have signs on logging roads saying that this is a public road but if you get hit by a logging truck then the onus is on you.

Re:Next up... (1)

Nullav (1053766) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259128)

This has nothing to do with trucks; it's a series of tubes!

Why not? (4, Funny)

Misanthrope (49269) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258844)

Aziz Bandwidth!

Re: Network neutrality again (1)

neutrino38 (1037806) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259274)

Ah, this is exactly the kind of situation that demonstrate how the network neutrality dogma is hurting. To have a per packet fair policy is just fine when existing infrastructure can wistand the load.

Now with the wonderfull IP / TCP whatever protocol, not beeing able to diffenciate traffic per user and per session end to end in the network lead the following situation: When the capacity is reduced (such incidents, maintenance, etc) or if traffic increases (chrismas, special events, etc.) where everybody get hurt instead of nicely rejecting the overflow and let the other users enjoy the network use.

I am a long time advocate of the demise of the so called "stupid network" in favor of an more advanced IP usage (V6? V7? V9?). where we could finally manage the bandwidth and the session per user end to end in the network. This would remove the need of "deep packet inspection" to do fair traffic shaping and reassure the privacy concerns. For ISPs, such an "intelligent IP network" would enable a sound capacity management.

Note that I do not caution any of the unfair tricks of US ISP that tend to favor their own content.
Emmanuel

Re:Why not? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259704)

Aziz... Bandwidth...
*makes another mark on paper*

Ah, good times (2, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258852)

When I was in dial-up tech support in the late 90s, we would occasionally get customers who were furious because "my business depends on the internet". Of course we couldn't tell customers what we really thought, so we would all stand outside on break, and be like "your business ha-hah, depends on ha-ha, the INTERNET???". "Well then, you should not have depended on a single provider, if it was really that critical".

It's one thing for some idiot pre-bubble day trader who fancied himself a "business man" to not understand that. In this case, it's a whole region. OK, maybe I'm being a bit harsh. Maybe they're where we were in the 90s. It seems like the whole network would go dark every few weeks or so back then. In the call center they would put up a big sign that said something like "MAE East is down". I haven't seen anything like that for a while. Maybe they'll put in some redundant routes after this, which is probably what happened here.

Re:Ah, good times (4, Informative)

MrMickS (568778) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258960)

Maybe they'll put in some redundant routes after this, which is probably what happened here.
Erm ... there are redundant routes. Two of them, 2km apart, have both been severed the result being that they are down to a single route. Given the political nature of the area it wouldn't be a surprise for the redunancy to not be as high as possible with inter-country connects.

Re:Ah, good times (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22258986)

Not every country can afford the redundancy mate. It's called being poor.

Re:Ah, good times (1)

Taelron (1046946) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259174)

RTFA... There are three major internet backbone lines connecting them, sepperated 1.8km apart. Two main use and one backup (redundant) line. The two main lines were both severed off the coast of Egypt. Different news outlets are offering conflicting stories, though the most prominent so far is that several ships were anchored in the wrong area and their anchors were dropped on the lines severing the lines in multiple places.

The lines are constantly getting damaged by dragnet fishing operations in other parts of the world, so not to surprising this happened off the coast of Egypt. Though it is curious to lines almost 2km appart were both damaged.

This just in! (3, Funny)

CCFreak2K (930973) | more than 6 years ago | (#22258868)

Cut cable causes communication catastrophe! Dismal disaster dooms denizens!

Re:This just in! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259068)

Egypt bleeds badly?

YVou FANIL it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259110)

Somehow... (1)

hyperz69 (1226464) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259134)

Even with all that rationing, they will probably get better service and speed then most Comcast users ;)

Solution: raise the price (0, Flamebait)

noidentity (188756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259206)

People should know how to use the Internet because people who download music and films are going to affect businesses who have more important things to do.

Unless people get it for free there, can't they just raise the price on bandwidth, now that it's more valuable there?

Re:Solution: raise the price (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259808)

Afaict they probablly can't do that at least not quickly because most ISP contracts are structured such that service levels are not gauranteed but price rises require a certain ammount of warning.

we are talking temporary disruption here not a permanent reduction in capacity.

What if.... (1)

NJVil (154697) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259528)

Downloading music and movies is your business, hmm?

Do your bit (1)

jlebrech (810586) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259794)

To help Egypt add their ip range to your blocklist for p2p.

Compromise (1)

MBHkewl (807459) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259796)

Why should those citizens who can often barely afford subscribing to the Internet, or have no means of reaching a better connection, compromise for businesses that can afford backup links? (Satellite anyone?)

Reminds of how kings in the old lived: by having the poor suffer.

Cut the spam, save the bandwidth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22259900)

If they'd turn off the spam bots over there, they'd have plenty of bandwidth to go around. I'm actually enjoying the 90%+ drop of spam in my inbox. I say, leave the lines off; nothing good (internet wise) comes out of that region anyway.

Mentioned on the BBC World Service (1)

terom (1077107) | more than 6 years ago | (#22259944)

They mentioned this yesterday on the BBC World Service as well, roughly paraphrased:

"The authorities there have called on private internet users to stop downloading videos and music, to leave bandwidth for business users"
Quite an amusing thing to say.
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