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India and US to Cooperate in Space Exploration

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the friends-offworld-and-on dept.

Space 153

p1234 writes "India and the US plan to cooperate in the exploration and use of outer space. India's first mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-1, is scheduled to be launched later this year. This is the culmination of long-term planning on both sides of the Atlantic. Apart from India's moon mission, Nair said a probe of Mars by India was very much on the agenda.'Our scientific community would like to see what new things we can find. It is not just for the sake of sending a probe to Mars. Yes, we have an agenda by 2012, by then we should have a Mars mission.'"

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Cooperation? (3, Funny)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278186)

India gets permission to use our moon landing sets in the American desert far from prying eyes :)

Re:Cooperation? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278732)

India gets permission to use our moon landing sets in the American desert far from prying eyes :)
Yep you know the one, right next to the secret government weather control complex and the Roswell flying saucer testing facility.

Re:Cooperation? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279720)

The Indian version will be a musical.

Of course there will cooperation. (0, Troll)

Rod Beauvex (832040) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278194)

We supply the money. The Indians supply the cheap labor.

Re:Of course there will cooperation. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278822)

Huh??? How is that "supplying" anything? Money is just pieces of paper. You can indefinitely print them, with no limit. Sounds like a good deal -- print worthless crap, Indians do all the work.

Seriously, why do they agree to this?

Re:Of course there will cooperation. (1)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278978)

you can exchange money for goods and servies. I didn't realize it was that complicated.

when you print an endless amount of money, it becomes worthless, therefor not suitable in exchange for goods and servies.

think before posting please, and read up on inflation while you're at it.

Re:Of course there will cooperation. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278984)

Huh??? How is that "supplying" anything? Money is just pieces of paper. You can indefinitely print them, with no limit.
It seems that you missed the entire currency debate during the end of the Stone Age.

Re:Of course there will cooperation. (1)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278986)

I think this guy could supply plenty of the funds [forbes.com] India isn't all poor, they just have a larger wealth divide then most western countries.

Call centers in space... (4, Funny)

owlnation (858981) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278198)

Now we are outsourcing NASA?

Re:Call centers in space... (0, Troll)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278208)

..to space :)

GOD DAMNIT (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278562)

Stop being a racist! You ass hole!

Re:GOD DAMNIT (3, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278672)

Stop being a racist! You ass hole!

I think the anti-offshoring sentiment is more an anti-corporation movement than an anti-Indian movement. I've seen in detail how corporate lobbyists manipulate the facts to create a "shortage". The bad guys are really the corporate lobbyists who hype free-trade and bribe politicians with campaign donations. We are not a democracy if lobbyists control politicians to such a degree.
         

Re:Call centers in space... (4, Funny)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278826)

"Bangalore, we have a problem..."

Re:Call centers in space... (2, Funny)

supremebob (574732) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279754)

...and YES, we already tried rebooting it!

Re:Call centers in space... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279954)

Yet another propagation of the misquoted phrase.. It was never "Houston, we have a problem;" it was:

Houston, we've had a problem.

</pedant>

Re:Call centers in space... (0)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278348)

Wow, I think we're setting a record for outsourcing jokes. Keep 'em coming...

"Hello, this is Ramadaiariaki...I mean Doug. How may I help you with your satellite's solar panels today?"

     

Re:Call centers in space... (4, Insightful)

Joaz Banbeck (1105839) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278482)

No, we are cooperating with the Indians because they are the natural opponents of two of our probable future oppoenents: China and Pakistan. Pakistan is most likely to be the source of an islamic nuclear bomb, and China is on track to become a true superpower to contest the US like Russia did in the 60s, 70s, and 80s.
This is Machiavellian geopolitics. Having a friend on the Asian continent will be useful much like having Israel for a friend in the Mid-east.

Re:Call centers in space... (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279530)

Having a friend on the Asian continent will be useful much like having Israel for a friend in the Mid-east.
Gee, I sure hope not.

Re:Call centers in space... (1)

Iftekhar25 (802052) | more than 6 years ago | (#22280408)

Seriously, I don't think anyone on either side of the Atlantic is considering the possibility of Pakistan's nuclear capabilities falling into the hands of Islamic extremists.

Even at the peak of anti-American sentiments after the invasion of Afghanistan, the hard-liner Islamic political parties never got more than 11% of the popular vote. Most political parties in Pakistan are moderate, and the nukes are buried deep in the military chain of command, which is secular.

Pakistan remains firmly in the pocket of the United States. And there's enough inertia from both Pakistan and the United States to make sure that these traditional allies remain that way.

Thumbing a lift (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278750)

NASA's just planning for when the shuttles wear-out completely and any replacement vehicles have been lost in the cracks.

Buying rides in India won't be as embarrassing as begging ones in Russia.

New Catch-phrase (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279208)

"Houston, we have a pinkslip!"
   

It's just a plan to get CHEAP astronauts! (2, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278202)

-1 troll

Astronauts have had it too good & expect too m (2, Funny)

walterbyrd (182728) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278454)

They expect their employers to train them, then they expect these huge salaries starting from their first day in outer space.

NASA really had no choice. Either NASA had to get around the H1-B laws, or hire illegal alian astronuts. And Sigourney Weaver advised against that.

Re:Astronauts have had it too good & expect to (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278606)

Either NASA had to get around the H1-B laws, or hire illegal alian astronuts.

Isn't "alien astronaut" an oxymoron? It hurts my nauts to think about that one.
   

mutual benefit? (2, Interesting)

peektwice (726616) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278204)

Not trying to troll here, but it would seem that India could use our already sizable knowledge of space exploration, and we can use cheap engineers. I wonder if this has anything to do with the general decline in engineering enrollment at US Universities?

Re:mutual benefit? (2, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278230)

and we can use cheap engineers.

You must not be a US engineer.
   

Re:mutual benefit? (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278336)

More to the point, enrollment in engineering and scientific curriculae is not exactly down in the U.S. ... it's enrollment by American citizens that is down. China and India are packing our schools, especially China. What's going to happen once they've sucked us dry of whatever knowledge they feel they need is another story.

Re:mutual benefit? (2, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278638)

Studies by the Rand institute and other research organizations have shown there is NO "engineer/sci shortage". Thus, it is a corporate myth that the US is not graduating enough. However, it will become a self-fulfilling prophecy if offshoring drives down wages in those fields.
   

Re:mutual benefit? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278702)

Have you ever seen what kind of mathematics is teached in American colleges?

Math110 has less content than most math classes in the first year of high school in Europe!

Maybe there are enough US engeeners around, but are they good for anything?

Re:mutual benefit? (2, Funny)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278718)

Correctin spalling on /./

Re:mutual benefit? (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278734)

Well, it's true the the primary education system in the U.S. is deficient, but that just means colleges have to provide remedial training.

Besides, good engineers are the ones that don't depend upon what they learn in school for everything anyways.

Re:mutual benefit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279578)

Totally agree about the fact that shool is not enough.
But it still needed.

And the time spent catching up on basic skills (that should have been tought in high school) steals time from other learning.

Let's face it: in 4 years you can learn only a fixed amount of things.
Who will get more of it? The one that comes well prepared or the one that needs to start almost from scratch?

I have nothing against Americans, but the school system is fundamentally broken, and it is no surprise that companies look elsewhere for workers.
It is not the lower pay! It is the knowledge base that comes with them.

Re:mutual benefit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279988)

I'm a physics student at an American public university. I don't know what it's like for engineers, but my first year of undergrad I started with MATH 241, vector calculus. Most of us skipped the very low-level classes. They had 1xx-level physics classes, but physics majors started at 2xx level. Overall, I'm very happy with my undergrad education. I think anybody who tried to tell me that American university science programs suck is full of shit.

Re:mutual benefit? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22280406)

Math110 has less content than most math classes in the first year of high school in Europe!

In practice, most engineers don't use that stuff often anyhow in the real world. US schools are just more practical.
   

Re:mutual benefit? (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278768)

I guess the answer to your final question depends on whether we let them stay in the country and work for our economy or deny them H1Bs and send them home to set up outsourcing businesses and improve China's economy.

Re:mutual benefit? (5, Interesting)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279654)

I have a sweet job at a small biotech startup in Silicon Valley. I was born in Philadelphia and I'm as white as white guys come. So who else works at this company?

The CEO, the CFO, and one of our principal investors are all from Iran. The CTO, the DBA, and my supervisor are from India. (The CTO is writing a tech book for a well-known publisher; I expect it will be reviewed here in a few months.) The principal database curator, the statistician, and three people on the dev team are Chinese nationals. The product manager is from the former Soviet Union; so is one of the UI devs and our street-smart IT guy. The head of tech support is Indian (OK, technically Canadian); she manages an offshore team of scientists in South America who import data into the system all day. We also just hired two additional Indian employees whom I haven't really met yet.

And then there are three white guys including me- AFAIK the only U.S. citizens. Maybe a few others are too (I've never really thought about it). Half of the people where I work came from a company that was originally started by another white guy. He lost faith in the future of the United States a few years ago, sold his business to a Fortune 500 corporation here (which promptly mismanaged it into oblivion), and took something like 10 or 20 million dollars back home to Australia.

I read threads like this one, I watch the news, and I listen to all the bloviating over Iran, over India and China, and it all just seems surreal to me. I wonder what the future holds for this place.

Re:mutual benefit? (5, Insightful)

protobion (870000) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279136)

I propose a different perspective. Have any of you actually thought, that all instances of cooperation of the US with China or India may not necessarily involve the other two countries supplying the "cheap labour". If you RTFA, NASA is actually providing 11 instruments to be on board the moon vehicle. No doubt , it will provide its knowledgebase as well. ISRO and NASA have a long history of co-operation.

Satellites are not launched everyday, moon missions still more infrequently. The usual way to obtain access to space for whatever reasons is often to provide some payload to a party who's going to launch a vehicle anyway. Not too long ago, India launched a military satellite for Israel. What India is providing here, is the excellent satellite launching infrastructure it has due to an active space program. The US space program was always geared towards manned-missions.

Let me end this rant by saying that developments in all fields do not have to reflect the trends in IT (where India does provide a cheap back-office). It's time people got off the idea that the US always provides the money, the knowledge, while other countries are sources of cheap brainless workers. Appreciate the achievements of others.

MOD parent up (1)

x1n933k (966581) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279498)

Seriously, the best reply I've read so far.

NASA Offshoring? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278222)

Outsourced astronauts? Now that's what I call REAL offshoring!

Re:NASA Offshoring? (2, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278270)

Now that's what I call REAL offshoring!

I coineth a new term: "Moonshoring"
     

Re:NASA Offshoring? (1)

stranger_to_himself (1132241) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278310)

how about 'Mooning'

Re:NASA Offshoring? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278412)

how about 'Mooning'

Sigh, being mooned by "free" trade.
     

Re:NASA Offshoring? (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278374)

To the shores of the Sea of Tranquility...

Re:NASA Offshoring? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279102)

To the shores of the Sea of Tranquility...

Right next to Pinkslip Crater.
     

It is good. (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278252)

If India buys some technology and know how from USA, it will help reduce the trade deficit USA has with India. But if NASA sells some of the technology to India, where will it set up the tech support center?

Re:It is good. (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278272)

Well, how far is the american economy from india outsourcing tech support to us?

Re:It is good. (1, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278320)

If India buys some technology and know how from USA

But they'll invent curry-in-a-tube.
         

Re:It is good. (1)

Kyojin (672334) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278560)

But that'd be an awesome thing! Oh for my mod points back...

This is geopolitics 101 (4, Insightful)

miletus (552448) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278330)

Like the previous deals on nuclear power, this is an attempt to bribe India away from getting too friendly with China and Iran, and buying U.S. arms instead of Russian. Science has nothing to do with it.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278430)

this is an attempt to bribe India away from getting too friendly with China and Iran, and buying U.S. arms instead of Russian.

India will have the last laugh because they will have bribes and weapons from all three, in the end.
     

Correction: 4 (Re:This is geopolitics 101) (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278500)

Correction, that's 4, not 3.
     

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (2, Insightful)

The One and Only (691315) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278724)

I don't think Iran's in any position to bribe India at the moment.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278738)

Oil

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

STrinity (723872) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279024)

Oil is a fungible resource. If Iran won't sell to them, someone else will.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (3, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279190)

Oil is a fungible resource. If Iran won't sell to them, someone else will.

How dare you accuse other countries of infecting our oil with mold!
   

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

a whoabot (706122) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278522)

Something which makes the US a nicer partner for India is that English is a fairly widely understood language in India, whereas neither Russian nor Mandarin are. Beats me how much of a factor that would be, though.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278968)

Something which makes the US a nicer partner for India is that English is a fairly widely understood language in India, whereas neither Russian nor Mandarin are. Beats me how much of a factor that would be, though.

Probably not much of one. There are already more people in China who can speak English than there are in the U.S.

By 2025 China will have more English speakers than the entire rest of the world.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (5, Interesting)

evilviper (135110) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278814)

Like the previous deals on nuclear power, this is an attempt to bribe India away from getting too friendly with China and Iran, and buying U.S. arms instead of Russian.

China and India are likely to be very serious rivals, rather than friends. Both have huge populations, and are developing countries trying to break into high-tech. Being right next to each hurts rather than helps.

Iran seems an extremely unlikely partner as well. India is an open democracy, with a far freer society, and are not predominately Muslim. I also don't see much that Iran could offer India to begin with, as India is technologically much further along.

Russia... Maybe... Though India has much stronger economic ties with the English speaking western world than it does with Russia. Are Indian car makers trying to buy the Range Rover and Jaguar brands so that they can sell such branded vehicles to Russia? China? Iran? Not likely.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (4, Interesting)

XchristX (839963) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278974)

Iran seems an extremely unlikely partner as well. India is an open democracy, with a far freer society, and are not predominately Muslim. I also don't see much that Iran could offer India to begin with, as India is technologically much further along.

India's greatest strength over Iran is it's liberal education, particularly in colleges and universities. That is why the technocrat generation in India is much larger and better trained than the ones in Iran.
Interestingly, a lot of Iranian students are now interested in pursuing higher education in India, particularly after Ahmadinejad expelled liberal professors from Iranian Universities, and Iranians have a harder time getting into western universities because of political problems. I spent a summer in the Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India and there were several Iranian students with very progressive and liberal outlook , unlike the Ayatollahs (they got me hooked on Dariush Mehrjui http://www.opendemocracy.net/arts/iranian_cinema_2595.jsp [opendemocracy.net] films) who were all cursing the Islamic theocracy in Iran.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278988)

India and Russia have a long history of excellent relations, especially in arms trade.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (4, Interesting)

miletus (552448) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279290)

Iran has gas, India needs gas, and there was a pipeline deal from Iran to India through Pakistan, which pretty muched got nixed because of U.S. pressure.

Russia has historically strong ties with India and still sells it a lot of weaponry. With the rise of a the Shanghai Cooperation Organization as an emerging military alliance between Russia, China, various Central Asian countries, and now Iran, India has to choose whether to ally with her neighbors or the U.S. The stakes are pretty high geopolitically.

China? (2, Informative)

donutello (88309) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278910)

If you're going to title your post geopolitics 101 you should know that there is no danger of India getting too chummy with China. The two countries have several issues including a long-standing border dispute. India is not going to get chummy with China anytime soon. It's more likely the US wants to build India up to be a stronger foil to China in the region.

And there is more (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279456)

Eastern India is very strongly pro China, but the vast majority of India does not really care (though probably considers themselves more western aligned, be it America, UK, or Germany). For India, they need EU AND America. The reason is that China and/or Pakistan is likely to make another play for India. Pakistan will almost certainly fall to the taliban within another 2 years. This is the same group that tore out ancient buddist statues as being against Allah. They will also go after Kashmir in the only way they know; war. China is about to have more problems then they know what to do. They have over population; massive skewing of the sex (many more men than women), and combine that with a real shortage of water (though these last few weeks might seem to suggest otherwise). The glaciers that supply China (as well as parts of India) with water are melting VERY rapidly. India will probably be hurt a bit, but China will take it in the shorts within 10 years. They will NEED to go after the water that now flows to India. India will want support from elsewhere, along the same line that UK had from America in WWII.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

STrinity (723872) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279076)

If this is Geopolitics 101, you flunk. China and India are rivals not friends, and they aren't going to get in bed with any country that would side with Pakistan if it got taken over by an Islamic fundamentalist dictatorship.

Re:This is geopolitics 101 (1)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279400)

Like the previous deals on nuclear power, this is an attempt to bribe India away from getting too friendly with China and Iran, and buying U.S. arms instead of Russian. Science has nothing to do with it.
I can't beleive that got modded insightful.

I hate to jump on the bandwagon, but, as others have pointed out, there is exactly zero chance of India and China being friendly any time soon. And, secondly, while I understand that it's considered "cool" these days to assign eeeevil motives to all US interactions with other nations, not EVERYTHING has to be about warfare and power. For fucks sakes, we should all be excited about the fact that for the first time in history, a nation other than Russia is capable of rivalling the US space effort! And other nations are close behind! This is an AWESOME time to be alive! We're going to see cooperation and competition in new frontiers! And all you can think is "aw, it's those damn yanks trying to take over the world again"? What's WRONG with you???

India? Must I say it? (1)

StevenABallmer (1224134) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278360)

They should have better things to spend money on!

Popcorn reek, except 10x worse (0, Offtopic)

MSTCrow5429 (642744) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278496)

They aren't going to be cooking eye watering curry in cramped space vehicles and stations, are they?

Jokes (4, Insightful)

Teun (17872) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278512)

I see several jokes about cheap engineers or bad education, the scariest example of the latter is probably the statement in the summary about 'both sides of the Atlantic'.
It really makes me wonder where India borders the Atlantic...

A likely indication the summary was done with some US-style geography classes :)

Re:Jokes (2, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278546)

'both sides of the Atlantic'. It really makes me wonder where India borders the Atlantic...

The borders have been offshored too.
   

Re:Jokes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278616)

India doesn't have to border the Atlantic Ocean to be on the opposite side of it relative to the US. Just look at a map. To get to India from the US traveling east, one can start in the US, travel clear across the Atlantic, travel over Africa and the Middle East, and then arrive in India. Thus India is on the opposite side of the Atlantic Ocean.

It's no different than saying that France and Ukraine are on opposite sides of the Czech Republic. That statement is completely true, even though neither France nor Ukraine borders the Czech Republic.

Re:Jokes (1)

Solra Bizna (716281) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278798)

If you start in Utah and move east long enough (including crossing the Atlantic) you eventually end up in Nevada. Therefore, Nevada and Utah are on opposite sides of the Atlantic, even though they border each other.

-:sigma.SB

Re:Jokes (1)

Loke the Dog (1054294) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278824)

Well, it's not so obvious when considering that the earth is round and that the countries in question are almost exactly on oposite sides.

Its like being in Australia and saying that Greenland is on the other side of India. It makes you go "wtf has India got to do with greenland and australia?"

Re:Jokes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278640)

Umm, India and the USA are on the same side of the Atlantic now?

Re:Jokes (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278676)

Thought that part was probably more likely written by an american than an indian.

Re:Jokes (1)

notnAP (846325) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279014)

Well, we had outsourced that article to them, but they haven't been reachable via email lately.

Sharing of knowledge will help US and India (4, Informative)

mohanbabu (1097817) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278566)

This is a great opportunity for both countries to share the best scientists on both sides. This mission http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/about_chandrayaan.htm [isro.org] is very critical and challenging for Indian scientists. They need every help they can get to pull this. In the past, when US denied supercomputing facilities, Indian went and reinvented the wheel http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/2906865.stm [bbc.co.uk] (although the effort was worth it).With relations improving between two countries, it will be foolish and immature not to accomplish.

This effort will NOT face any opposition like the Nuclear deal. The nuclear deal went down the drain because the stupid "left" politicians played the "Indian congress government is surrendering to US" card. They also threatened to withdraw their support which would have collapsed the Congress ruling party http://www.heritage.org/Research/AsiaandthePacific/wm1688.cfm [heritage.org] . This time, they will make sure this deal is made and take the bragging rights for landing India on the moon. Yes, the Indian politics is screwed up. But they are not fools to let this deal go away.

Re:Sharing of knowledge will help US and India (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278648)

Yes, the Indian politics is screwed up.

Of Indian politics I know nothing, but if they're more screwed up than ours I'd be very impressed.

I just HAVE to ask (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279492)

I have been following this deal for quite some time. I was under the impression that it was still being looked at (though it seemed like the haggling had gone underground). In addition, I did notice the left announced that they had a deal with China to do something similar. What you are suggesting that the US nuke deal truly is dead? If so, will India seriously consider China's deal? China does not have much tech knowhow on building nuclear reactor save what they obtained from USSR and stole from America (of which some of ours was ALLOWED to be stolen; it will cause them problems if they use it; along the same line as when China stole the capacitor tech from japan).

Wrong country to learn from (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278756)

Great, so other countries are arranging their priorities the way the US does. Of course, shit like space exploration is a better investment than dealing with widespread problems ON OUR OWN FCUKING PLANET! Poverty? Disease? War? Pfft, who gives a shit when we can waste billions on exploring space?! *wide, greedy grin*

You know US, you're the country everyone looks up to as an example. Maybe you should lead people down a better road than this. And to other countries, please don't mold your politics after the US.

Re:Wrong country to learn from (4, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278786)

who gives a shit when we can waste billions on exploring space?

Do you have any idea what you talking about, what the value of near-Earth space efforts have been? Billions upon billions in economic returns (hell, weather monitoring alone is worth the price of admission.) Space research is hardly wasted. Could all of us do better at managing our world? Sure. But shutting down space programs isn't the way to do that.

Re:Wrong country to learn from (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279936)

Great, so other countries are arranging their priorities the way the US does. Of course, shit like space exploration is a better investment than dealing with widespread problems ON OUR OWN FCUKING PLANET! Poverty? Disease? War? Pfft, who gives a shit when we can waste billions on exploring space?! *wide, greedy grin*

I see a couple of responses. First, space exploration is an investment in the future. These others are not. They merely fix problems that shouldn't exist.

Second, which one of that list is the most important? Why aren't you advocating that all resources go to fix the most urgent problem first? That is, if war is the worst problem, then forget poverty and disease. Focus on war, right? Such an extreme viewpoint would ignore, of course, that there's tremendous synergy in spreading resources around and working on more problems. Well, space has powerful synergies with a lot of Earth-side problems. For example, poverty can be eased by growing the economy into space. The ill effects of war can be lessened by space-based intelligence gathering resources. Wars weren't started because two sides knew too much about each other and what they were doing. Space is the ideal laboratory for environmental technologies like complete recycling of water or biomass, solar power, nuclear power, and space-based industry. By moving people in space, we lessen their Earth-side ecological footprint.

Re:Wrong country to learn from (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22280044)

So you're saying space can help to alleviate the problems we face on Earth? Give me a break. If we can't deal with the problems on the surface (of the planet, that is), how do you suppose we're going to magically make things in space work? Economy in space? You do realize nations will just fight over newly found resources the way we do with what we have here at home, right? Getting into space doesn't get away from Earth's problems. Getting into space just means we have more territory to fight over, and a larger ground for more wars.

No. We shouldn't be imposing our almighty humans-know-everything agenda onto the rest of the universe until we can handle harmony on one tiny little planet first.

New Delhi... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22278774)

we have a problem.

Shamless Pun (0)

MrSteveSD (801820) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278850)

From the article.

"I am honored to sign this agreement with the India Space Research Organization," Griffin said.


Hmmm. Obviously trying to curry favor there :)

Waiting... (1)

vistic (556838) | more than 6 years ago | (#22278876)

I'm just going to wait and see if any asshats here can post a thoughtful comment about India's space exploration, maybe admiring their abilities and scholastic achievements... without making any asinine semi-racist comments about Indians stinking of curry, having unintelligible accents, being cheap labor, etc...

So... any yet?

Re:Waiting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279666)

Outsource your sense of humor, Chandralamadingdong?

Re:Waiting... (1)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | more than 6 years ago | (#22280012)

post a thoughtful comment about India's space exploration, maybe admiring their abilities and scholastic achievements...

Good God man, why? This is Slashdot, not The Journal of International Relations! Where else would we show off our subtle and sophisticated Western wit (or at least half of it)?

Wow... (1)

SmokeSerpent (106200) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279056)

Think of all the paint it's going to take to write the names on all the Indian space doohickeys.

Just a ruse (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279362)

I'll bet somewhere in this "agreement" is a provision that allows big government contractors like Lockheed and L3 to outsource sensitive classified projects to Indian engineering outsourcing firms.

Science and Engineering in the US are dead. They died when we stopped teaching Math and Science to our kids back in the 90's.

How can we be helping you? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279390)

We're gonna route the angry calls of protest from the Martian residents to Indian call centers?

both sides of the Atlantic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22279398)

This is the culmination of long-term planning on both sides of the Atlantic.

Well I sure hope the good folks living on that sub-continent in the Indian Ocean (thousands of kilometers from any side of the Atlantic) had some say in the planning too!

Both sides of the atlantic? (2, Insightful)

jmdc (1152611) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279432)

Um ... India's not on a side of the Atlantic.

Re:Both sides of the atlantic? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279728)

Quiet now. We don't need our senators to know that.

Re:Both sides of the atlantic? (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279922)

Indeed. I believe the correct relational term is "both sides of the call center".

Re:Both sides of the atlantic? (1)

kryten_nl (863119) | more than 6 years ago | (#22280078)

They're still considering inviting India to join NATO, a decision will be made once Australia becomes a full member.

Huh??? (1)

Comatose51 (687974) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279596)

"This is the culmination of long-term planning on both sides of the Atlantic"

Uh... I'm fairly sure that India doesn't border the Atlantic. Rather, I'm fairly sure they border another ocean, the Indian ocean perhaps.

comments here remind me of blue collar miners (5, Insightful)

sunilarjun (1232258) | more than 6 years ago | (#22279864)

Sad to see the types of comments posted here---remuind me of blue collar miners etc...who would talk of "college educated" guys in the same way---because they were scared their way of living is being disrupted. If you're getting your butt kicked by India and China, learn to innovate---that's what America stands for---I don't hear Bill Gates or Steve Jobs whining like the pathetic folks here.

Virus link? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22280086)

When I went to the foxbusiness link, it downloaded something to my computer I believe (it went by too fast), and I think when closing the window, a marketing page opened up. Anyone else experiencing this sort of problem?

Do NOT expect a civilized society in India... (0, Troll)

jawahar (541989) | more than 6 years ago | (#22280250)

As per BBC, 80% of the Indians live on 20 rupees (25p) a day. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/6946800.stm [bbc.co.uk]
20.00 INR = 0.511247 USD as per http://www.xe.com/ [xe.com]
And do NOT expect a civilized society in India...

India on the Atlantic (1)

splashbot (1179993) | more than 6 years ago | (#22280386)

What's with this "planning on both sides of the atlantic" business, India is not on the Atlantic Ocean, contrary to Mr Columbus's imaginative Thoughts. Come on... pfft
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