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Deal Reportedly Reached In Writers' Strike

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the gonna-be-a-backlog dept.

Television 333

BlueshiftVFX writes to let us know that the writers' strike may be over. CNBC and other media are quoting former Disney CEO Michael Eisner: "It's over. They made the deal, they shook hands on the deal. It's going on Saturday to the writers in general... A deal has been made, and they'll be back to work very soon."

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This is news for nerds... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22348726)

...because many writers use computers.

Re:This is news for nerds... (5, Insightful)

rainmayun (842754) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348780)

... because many nerds watch tv.

Re:This is news for nerds... (2, Insightful)

homey of my owney (975234) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349294)

Damn, in time for the Oscars... Why couldn't they hold out for another couple of weeks?

Re:This is news for nerds... (2, Insightful)

bkr1_2k (237627) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349504)

Because they want something to come back to when they reach a deal. If they held out past the oscars many "analysts" of the industry speculated they wouldn't be able to recover their viewers. As it is I suspect most of the decent new shows are going to be dead anyway.

I need only three words to explain this (4, Interesting)

YA_Python_dev (885173) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349064)

Joss Whedon, Dollhouse [wikipedia.org] .

Re:I need only three words to explain this (5, Insightful)

howdoesth (1132949) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349664)

Joss Whedon, Dollhouse [wikipedia.org] .
I was really expecting Dollhouse to get killed during the strike before it ever even had a chance to get off the ground, but it looks like Fox is fully committed to letting me see it, fall in love, and then break my heart after 14 episodes. Thanks, guys.

Re:This is news for nerds... (0, Flamebait)

tritonman (998572) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349092)

oh thank God it's over! Now I can finally stop not giving a rats ass about it! I almost cared as much about this as I cared about the baseball players strike.

I guess... (4, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348732)

I guess this means the Colbert/Stewart/O'Brien fued has been resolved, too...

Re:I guess... (1)

mcmonkey (96054) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348930)

Wasn't Stewart on Letterman's show before Conan was on Stewart's and Stewart could spawn Colbert?

(I don't have Sirius, but I'm sure Stern is taking credit for all of them.)

Re:I guess... (1)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349290)

Possibly, but Letterman has writers, so he didn't need to get involved in the fight.

Re:I guess... (3, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349130)

I guess now the shows can go back to the same tired old bits they were rehashing before the strike forced them to get creative for the first time in years. -sigh-

Re:I guess... (5, Funny)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349634)

Well, some of them. The good news is that they can take some of the programs that were suspended due to the Writer's Strike, like Bionic Woman and Journeyman, and go ahead and cancel them.

Is it? (1, Insightful)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348734)

I've heard rumblings elsewhere that Eisner is spewing crap, and honestly he's not someone I'm going to trust without outside confirmation. When a writer says it's over, I'll believe it.

Re:Is it? (5, Informative)

NekSnappa (803141) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348862)

Well according to the Writers Guild website

The Latest Word

(2/4/08)

Dear Fellow Members,

I would like to update you on where we stand with bargaining with the AMPTP. While we have made important progress since the companies re-engaged us in serious talks, negotiations continue. Regardless of what you hear or read, there are many significant points that have yet to be worked out.

In order to keep members abreast of the latest developments, informational meetings are being planned by both Guilds for this weekend - details to be announced. Neither the Negotiating Committee, nor the West Board or the East Council, will take action on the contract until after the membership meetings.

As the talks proceed, never forget that during this period it is critical for us to remain on the picket lines united and strong. We are all in this together.

In Solidarity,

John F. Bowman

Chair, WGA Negotiating Committee

Re:Is it? (4, Informative)

longacre (1090157) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349346)

That WGA post was made three days before Eisner's statement. Still, Eisner is the only one saying it's over. No one from WGA or any studios have said a word.

Re:Is it? (1)

andphi (899406) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349414)

You're exactly right.

The story isn't that the strike is over or even that the strike might be over soon (though it might be). The "story" is that Michael Eisner thinks the strike is (or should be) over. Eisner sided with the AMPTP, so this announcement of opinion is no surprise.

The truth is, the strike ends when the WGA says it does. The WGA membership hasn't yet voted on the latest proposals, so the picketing continues.

Re:Is it? (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349722)

Sumner Redstone of Viacom seems to believe [yahoo.com] the strike is about to end too. I'd imagine Eisner's lack of power means he's one of the few people who can talk directly about what's going on.

What a relief! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22348738)


Bread goes better with circuses!

Was that still going on? (0, Flamebait)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348742)

I didn't even notice it to be honest.

Re:Was that still going on? (0)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348812)

Nor did I.

I don't watch TV or movies really, except for the local evening news.

Re:Was that still going on? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349112)

> I don't watch TV or movies really, except for the local evening news.
And we all know white house staff are non-union writers.

Re:Was that still going on? (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349376)

Thanks for letting us know [theonion.com] .

Re:Was that still going on? (4, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348974)

Personally, I thought Conan, Colbert and Stewart were a lot funnier WITHOUT the writers. It forced them to get creative for the first time in years. Now that the writers are coming back, looks like it's back to the 10-millionth reiteration of "Masturbating Bear" and other tired old skits.

Could they have just STAYED on strike?

Re:Was that still going on? (4, Interesting)

AmaDaden (794446) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349100)

They were damn good, but for how long? I don't think they would be able to keep coming up with original material for much longer. They would burn out eventually. If you noticed while their skits were good they needed to be dragged out. More interviews and more 'lets look at this'. They were able to make skits just not nearly as many.

Re:Was that still going on? (2, Insightful)

gnick (1211984) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349208)

Conan, Colbert and Stewart were a lot funnier WITHOUT the writers
They were hilarious, but uneven. A lot of what they did was novel and fun. But, a lot was pretty weak. As fun as the "feud" was at times, other times it was obviously a lot more drawn out than it needed to be (Captain Obvious, I know...)

I can't say that I really missed it while it was gone, but I do welcome back The Word.

Re:Was that still going on? (1, Informative)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349432)

Could they have just STAYED on strike?

No, please fucking God no, seriously!

While many people here might be single, some of us have wives that like to watch garbage TV and w/o the normal dreck that is shown on TV she had to find something else to occupy her TV watching time. Unfortunately for me that included such highlights as America's Ballroom Challenge [pbs.org] and Masterpiece [pbs.org] on PBS. If you think Dancing with the Stars was bad, well, Ballroom Challenge is a completely new level of horrendous bullshit that no human should ever have to see (ballroom dancing to rap is surprisingly worse than to horribly outdated music). I won't even get into the Masterpiece bullshit because, well, no one should give a shit less about Jane Austen.

Believe me, even though I don't watch all that much TV (I have been obsessing over BBC America's Kitchen Nightmares and Last Restaurant Standing [bbcamerica.com] ) it has been fucking hell for me.

Re:Was that still going on? (2, Interesting)

Otter (3800) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349154)

Same here. If a network used the money to pay the Giants and Patriots to play a tiebreaker, it would be more likely to get my attention than new episodes of Law & Order competing with the three Law & Order reruns and eleven CSI reruns on at the same time.

Re:Was that still going on? (4, Informative)

danguyf (631016) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349244)

Well, aren't you just Mr. Too Cool For School?

I'm so glad to know that you didn't even deign to notice that a large portion of those who work hard to entertain you lost their jobs and houses in a fight over the future of online content rights.

Re:Was that still going on? (3, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349408)

In all fairness, I'm not sure the "According to Jim" writers deserve your vigorous defense.

Re:Was that still going on? (2, Insightful)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349462)

a large portion of those who work hard to entertain you


If someone doesn't watch tv, then how are/were they affected by this strike? They weren't. I do watch some tv but didn't really notice any change except for reruns of 'How I Met Your Mother' and 'The Big Bang Theory'. Other than that, no problems here either.

Aside from that, this is probably one of the few times I will agree with a union demand. In this case, yes, the writers should get compensated for their work when that work is sent online, on DVD or elsewhere. The medium doesn't matter. The fact of the matter is, they worked to produced the product, they should get compensated.

Re:Was that still going on? (1)

bobobobo (539853) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349466)

Nor did I. I never watch TV [theonion.com] in fact.

Terms? (3, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348752)

With no linked article and no information in the summary, I'm curious if the writers got their Internet distribution royalties after all?

Re:Terms? (1)

Steepe (114037) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348876)

here is a link I found.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=ac6jnk1bz4nM&refer=us [bloomberg.com]

not much info in it, but hey... its a link.

Re:Terms? (1)

sjaguar (763407) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349212)

Hey, maybe some of us didn't want to RTFA. Thanks for the link though. I can now properly comment on this story without RTFA. :)

Re:Terms? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349002)

Almost certainly - that wasn't the main sticking point.

The real question is if the writers were able to force Guild members into cartoons and reality shows - two aspects of the strike that weren't quite as widely publicized, and the real sticking point.

Re:Terms? (1)

BigDaveSittingOnHisC (1196625) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349138)

well, to be honest... they needed to get a deal as soon as they could, as the strike went on, more re-runs of junk TV went out, and the American people watch it. Thus proving Americans will watch anything and the writers putting themselves out of a job by default. so my best guess the deal they got was pretty rubbish. I personally don't watch TV (because its utter crap!!!) but that's my 0.02

Re:Terms? (1)

AndersOSU (873247) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349522)

Is that true?

I haven't been following closely, but I'd expect that ratings would be down overall. I'd further expect that ratings would be way down on the flagship stations (NBC, CBS, FOX, and ABC), and up a bit on the cable channels (FX, USA, TNT, etc.) But that's still got to hurt the media companies right? The decreased value of an NBC ad wouldn't be offset by the modest increase in a BRAVO ad would it?

Does anyone have any links to any actual analysis of the financial effects of the writers strike on the media companies?

Re:Terms? (1)

BigDaveSittingOnHisC (1196625) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349656)

Does anyone have any links to any actual analysis of the financial effects of the writers strike on the media companies?
hah, You could have a look, but i'm sure they would just make them up like the RIAA!

Re:Terms? (1)

slodan (1134883) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349358)

I certainly hope they did. From an outsider's perspective (I am neither a Hollywood writer nor much of a TV watcher), there was no reason not to give writer's their royalties. Revenue streams may be less clear in an online world since making people watch commercials is more difficult and bandwidth costs are absorbed by the distributer rather than the television stations, but that shouldn't have any affect on the amount paid to a writer. I am surprised they don't have a default pay-template that applies to any given script, and that any special considerations would be decided by independent negotiation on a case-by-case basis.

Seems like noone won (2, Insightful)

TheBiGW (982686) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348794)

'As a result of studio cutbacks, however, many of the writers who went on strike are unlikely to return to the same big-money contracts they'd had as individuals with the studios.' It seems like no-one won from these strikes. TV companies take write downs, writers are not paid as well as they were, everyone looses.

Re:Seems like noone won (1)

jandrese (485) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349018)

Depends if the writers are going to get new media royalties I guess. That could be a pyhrric victory for the writers.

Re:Seems like noone won (5, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349198)

'As a result of studio cutbacks, however, many of the writers who went on strike are unlikely to return to the same big-money contracts they'd had as individuals with the studios.'

That sounds a lot to me like "We fired these guys for supporting the union, but we can't say that because that would get us in trouble with the NLRB."

yawn (0, Redundant)

moseman (190361) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348796)

I am sooooo excited.

Too late? (4, Funny)

n0dna (939092) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348798)

I've nearly forgotten which couple of shows even held my attention.

Too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22348802)

My TV has been off for the past month, and I just canceled my cable service and got a gym membership.

(I'm dead serious.)

I guess (0, Flamebait)

bigpaperbag (1105581) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348808)

That means next season will be back for most shows. I wonder how this will relate to current season DVD releases. You would think they will be bundled with another season or sold as very low prices. Which ironically is the writer's shooting themselves in the foot, because even if they get more shares in dvd/download profits, they've made there be less to sell/download. This whole strike is a farce. The WGA is sickening. I'm sure there are plenty of poor little writers out there who think this might actually help them, but I bet any deal ends up highly favoring the top end writers. I hope Eisner's comment about top dollar contracts being canceled is true. Teach them that whining for months and not working is not how you get more money.

So... (0)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348814)

The strike went on long enough and saved the publishers enough money to pay for their demmands... So the writters get like a couple percent increase in their salaries while they lost about 1/3 of their anual income. These are writters not mathamatitions, They are good at making the general population feel sorry for them but... They don't realized they screwed themselves.

Re:So... (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348892)

Does it save the publishers money?

I thought writers were paid per script. They still need those scripts to make shows.

Re:So... (1)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348968)

With reality TV, you don't even need actors let alone scripts to make a show.

Re:So... (1)

sammyo (166904) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349352)

Well actually you do. Do you really think a 'producer' comes up with the 'challenges'? The host is all 'adlibs'?

One subtle sticking point was that the 'non-writers that 'sketched' out the challenges are covered by another union (IATSE?) and the studio heads were able to use that to play off workers against each other.

Re:So... (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348994)

And I bet it's not like these people (well, the good and creative ones anyway) just sat on their asses for that time. Most likely they have quite a few things thought out and written down that they'll be able to adopt and sell now with the new rules - the producers are starved for content right now, they've run out of shelved things, taken breaks, and now need a lot of scripts to catch up again.

Re:So... (1)

NeoSkandranon (515696) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349240)

Seems like lots of the better/more-known writers packed up and went on tour performing stand-up type gigs with the material they come up with, rather than handing it over to a show.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349010)

Except you don't even know the terms yet, math genius.

Re:So... (1)

zulater (635326) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349114)

I was wondering more about how the people that design the sets, the camera people, stage hands, makeup people etc. are going to be compensated or how screwed they were when they had no control over it.

Re:So... (0, Troll)

Reverend528 (585549) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349298)

Yeah. As it is, those folks only make $75000 to $100000 a year. That's not much to live on.

Re:So... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349382)

Your an idiot. They know that they will never make back the money they lost to being on strike. Thats not what a strike is about. Its about making the future better for all writers. The writers that just started working or the writer that will be hired in 2 years, those are the people the will benefit the most from fair working conditions. If the deal is fair and the entertainment market doesn't change drastically, then it is unlikely that the writers will go back on strike in the next 30 years. Plenty of time to make back lost wages.

Re:So... (4, Insightful)

OG (15008) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349412)

That's thinking a bit short term. If their terms are met like they were hoping, it means that they're not cut out of emerging media outlets. That's going to be an important point in the next couple of decades as people shift their content viewing to legitimate online venues and away from traditional television.

Re:So... (5, Interesting)

jacobw (975909) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349452)

So the writters get like a couple percent increase in their salaries while they lost about 1/3 of their anual income. These are writters not mathamatitions,


And based on your comment, "mathamatitions" are not "writters," either.

Actually, a lot of the people on the WGA negotiating committee are "show runners"--IE, writer/producers with a huge amount of responsibility. One of the negotiators, for example, is Carlton Cuse [imdb.com] , one of the two guys who runs LOST; as you can imagine, you don't end up running a multi-million-dollar enterprise unless you have a lot of financial savvy.

So why would a bunch of smart people recommend a strike under these circumstances? Two main reasons.

First, writing careers can be very short-lived, and they are usually sporadic, with many periods of unemployment. (In fact, in any given year, nearly half of WGA members are unemployed.) The major issue in this strike was "residuals"--the royalties that writers get every time a TV show they wrote is broadcast, or a movie they wrote is sold. So, it's not entirely foolish to give up your 50% chance of employment this year to get a good deal on royalties that might be feeding your family for the next two decades.

Second, believe it or not, this was not strictly a selfish action. WGA members are very conscious of the fact that a lot of the stuff that makes it possible for us to earn our livings was won by previous generations of writers. Obviously a desire to have a good living is the main incentive in any business negotiation, but in the back of all our minds, we don't want to be the generation that let the studios roll back several decades of labor gains.

DISCLAIMER: I am an individual WGA member. These are just my opinions. I don't speak for the union.

Wow (5, Interesting)

mpapet (761907) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349628)

You and the moderators have no clue. Here's a couple of Fun Hollywood Facts.

1. There is so much money flowing through the distribution cartel, that unions are the only way to wrestle it out of the Producers/Studios. I'm old enough to remember a blockbuster low-budget movie called "My big fat greek wedding" has, to date, not turned a profit. Now, I could see a bad movie not turning a profit, but that movie was and still is INSANELY popular. Hell, my wife still gets residuals from a commercial that appeared in a big-budget movie made 20 years ago. That's how shady Hollywood accounting is.

2. Writers are about the least respected guild in Hollywood. Seriously, food craft gets more respect. (probably because they aren't a union)

5. Producers routinely turn great stories/scripts into trash. Once they own the rights to the script, let the destruction begin!!! This is why good books rarely make good movies. Once the writer gives up control it's all downhill. Notable exceptions usually have the writer having final say on the script.

You, and the idiots who modded you up have no clue.

Damn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22348832)

I was hoping that the strike would go on forever.

Original story link (5, Informative)

TheBiGW (982686) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348838)

This seems to be missing so here it is: http://www.cnbc.com/id/23057002/ [cnbc.com]

Sooooo.... (4, Insightful)

nickj6282 (896871) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348840)

We're just not going to get an article with this one? Are we supposed to take Kdawson's word for it? Way to go!

Darn (4, Insightful)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348856)

Part of me was hoping this would never be resolved and that this would eventually cause a media revolution. Whether it was the rise of local access channels or simultaneous live airing and official torrent release, I thought there was a small chance it might have really changed things from top to bottom.

Ah well, at least The Office will be back.

End of the stike, eh? (1)

Analog Squirrel (547794) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348874)

Does anyone really care?

Oh No!!! What About The Great New Reaility Shows! (3, Funny)

webword (82711) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348880)

Man, if the strike is over too soon then the new reality shows will get killed.

I mean, aren't you dying to see My Dad Is Better Than Your Dad [nbc.com] ?

It debuts on February 18th! Don't miss it, kids!

It's all timing (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348888)

Like any good comedy it's all about timing. Writers used the directors deal as a template, or so it's rumored. Then again, now the studios have had a wonderful excuse to cut some dead weight and they'll have a deal in time for the Oscars.

So what? (1)

Canosoup (1153521) | more than 6 years ago | (#22348898)

Does anyone really even give a damn anymore?

Re:So what? (3, Insightful)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349424)

Does anyone really even give a damn anymore?

Uhh, yeah. I'd like my last season of BSG, thankyouverymuch.

Plus a couple of other shows, but that one's top of the list.

We know who did it (1)

eebra82 (907996) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349024)

Sources say that once Jack Bauer got bailed out of jail, he then met with the WGA to discuss the details over a friendly cup of White House approved [latimes.com] tea. Interestingly, it took only 30 minutes for the WGA to agree on a 30% salary cut.

Re:We know who did it (2, Funny)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349102)

I say put Jack Bauer in "Lost" - it would only take HIM 24 hours to get off the island...

Not dead yet (2, Informative)

xsarpedonx (707167) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349052)

Although it would appear that the strike is likely on it's way to being over, it's not quite over yet. [deadlineho...ddaily.com]

Here's the WGA's timetable [deadlineho...ddaily.com] for the next few days which may result in the actual end of the strike.

A deal isn't a deal till the paper is signed (1)

cyxs (242710) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349066)

Anyone that has done work with contracts knows that till its written in black and white the deal isn't done. Sure you might come to terms but those terms need to be defined otherwise its pointless.

Lets hope... (1)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349070)

Let's hope that the deal means no more crappy sitcoms that just take and take from old favorites like Seinfeld, Friends, & Cheers. That type of workmanship is why they've been getting crappy pay in the first place.

Re:Lets hope... (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349182)

As a Hollywood writer, I am intrigued by this concept of "originality" that you speak of. But I can't quite wrap my head around it. Can you explain it in terms of other things that I'm already comfortable and familiar with?

Fantastic! (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349134)

I can get back to watching Lost! Maybe they'll actually tell me what the hell that Black Smoke thing was, and how the hell a Polar Bear got on the island. Or maybe they'll just kill the rest of the characters, then go all "Who Shot JR?" and bring them back because it sucks.

Re:Fantastic! (1)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349444)

I have to admit I like that show. It has a mysterious quality to it, despite being a vacuous soap opera. Also, it's mesmerizing somehow. The production is very slick.

In any case, the secret of the island is that it will do what the writers tell it to.

Eisner putting the screws on (1)

Serengeti (48438) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349174)

This seems to be nothing more than Eisner playing to the cameras. No deal has been made until the writers actually agree to it (Sunday seems to be when everyone expects it to go down.)

Eisner's just suggesting (somewhat aggressively) that the deal being offered to the writers is so good they won't turn it down.

FUD??

Re:Eisner putting the screws on (1)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349364)

You knew this when he turned his head to the right and whispered, "Line?"

Oh boy! I can't wait... (2, Funny)

jbarr (2233) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349194)

...for all of that quality programming to return!

American Gladiators (1)

zebb2000 (1234350) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349196)

Does this mean the Hulkster will have a whole new set of intelligent dialogue?

Big deal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349216)

Hopefully this has shown America just how much of a waste of time watching TV shows really is.

slashdot, i'm disappointed (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349218)

whenever the subject matter of tv comes up, i can count on someone in the comments smug enough to loudly announce that he doesn't watch or own a television. who do i get to ridicule now?

where oh where is my favorite smug stereotype? [theonion.com]

Re:slashdot, i'm disappointed (1)

myz24 (256948) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349596)

I own a TV but don't use it for much more than playing Wii these days. In fact, this week I've watched less than 1 hour of TV.

1/3 their salaries (1)

EnOne (786812) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349232)

Even though they were no longer being paid for new scripts the actual writers were probably still getting residuals from previous scrips, reruns... the people who really got hosed were the people that are not members of the WGA. The writers' assistants, production assistants, and other lower-level staffers that were immediately fired when the strike started.

damned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349252)

now tv is going to suck again...except for Family Guy

Over? Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349256)

You do know that if it's going back to the writers, they can vote against it.

Outsourcing Scriptwriters (4, Funny)

initialE (758110) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349258)

It was either that or outsource scripts to India. Imagine Bollywood style comedy on American TV...

Slashdot Users, Yall Let Me Down! :-) (3, Funny)

tjstork (137384) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349268)

40 comments about the writer strike ending and not a single one of you posted the obligatory:

That's Great, When's Battlestar Galactica Going to Be On Finally?

They just don't make geeks like they used to, I guess.

Cue comments from (1, Flamebait)

mattgoldey (753976) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349372)

all the condescending douchebags who are far too intelligent to watch television.

Re:Cue comments from (1)

whistlingtony (691548) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349498)

Damn Skippy.... TV is Evil. It sucks out your ambition and your attention to the real world around you. Go get a hobby! Talk to your neighbors! Go for a walk!

Snatch back your brains Zombies... Snatch 'em back and HOLD 'em.

-T

Congratulations! But it's too late! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22349390)

Congratulations!

However I am sad to say, it's too late. I acquired another hobby to take up my time.

I am now a welder as well as a seamstress; I've been sewing for the last 15 years because movies were bad enough.

Now, with the dearth of good entertainment because of the strike, I decided, in desparation, to run out and get a tig welding machine from Miller Electric and am self teaching myself welding to make jewelry to accent my home made clothing.

Now, I am hooked. It will be difficult to make me go back to the movies.

Check out my welding and sewing journal at www.clearplastic.com

So what does this mean (1)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349398)

for shows like Prison Break, Ugly Betty* and Lost? Will their seasons just end as they are or will they just have a little hiatus and continue the season in a few weeks?

*obviously I don't watch the show, as charming as it is. I'm asking on behalf of others

Pity It's Over (5, Informative)

Phoenix666 (184391) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349416)

I had a dark horse hope that perhaps the writers would learn to disintermediate the studios. The reason is a friend recently turned me on to BBC's "I.T. Crowd," which you can only watch in the States over the intertubes.

There are no commercials in the webcast, of course, but the BBC shop sends me emails advertising box DVD sets of Doctor Who and the like; definitely a fave show and the sort of message I'm open to, as opposed to endless commercials on regular TV for cars and feminine hygiene products, which I'm not in the market for.

Get BSG on the air ASAP (1)

Araxen (561411) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349468)

pls k thx!

Does that Mean Fred Thompson Will Comeback? (2, Funny)

CR0WTR0B0T (944711) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349506)

I heard he dropped out because without writers he had nothing to say. :) Think he will make a comeback?

Craig Mazin usually has the most salient details (1)

FuckTheModerators (883349) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349612)

At his blog, The Artful Writer [artfulwriter.com]

This Matters? (0, Troll)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 6 years ago | (#22349724)

"Stuff That Matters", remember?
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