Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Microsoft Pushes Copyright Education Curriculum

samzenpus posted more than 6 years ago | from the problem-solved dept.

Microsoft 251

Dotnaught writes "Backed by a study that says teens show more respect for copyrights when told of possible jail time for infringement, Microsoft is launching a new intellectual property curriculum to educate kids about IP law. To support its teachings, Microsoft has launched MyBytes, a Web site where students can create custom ringtones, share content — "their own content," as Microsoft makes clear — and learn more about intellectual property rights."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Duh (5, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413624)

possible jail time for infringement
hehehe.. no shit. I don't know if "respect" is the right word though.

Re:Duh (3, Funny)

Divebus (860563) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413750)

MSCopyright Rule #1: Everything belongs to us. By reading this, you are bound to the terms of the EULA. Sign here.

Re:Duh (2, Insightful)

theophilosophilus (606876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414414)

MSCopyright Rule #2: Go back to #1.

Re:Duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22413948)

> hehehe.. no shit. I don't know if "respect" is the right word though.

Let them hate, so long as they fear.

Re:Duh (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414234)

Let them fear, so long as there's uncertainty and doubt.

Re:Duh (0)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414102)

Backed by a study that says teens show more respect for copyrights when told of possible jail time for infringement,
Do they tell these teens what the legal criteria are for civil and criminal copyright infringement?

The only people who go to jail for infringement are commercial bootleggers and I can't imagine that'd include anyone under the age of 18 AKA high school students.

Not to mention that the linked "study" is actually a memo summarizing the findings and tells us nothing about the social/cultural/economic makeup of their 510 person 7th-to-10th grade sample.

Re:Duh (5, Insightful)

shark72 (702619) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414524)

"The only people who go to jail for infringement are commercial bootleggers and I can't imagine that'd include anyone under the age of 18 AKA high school students."

Not correct from either a factual or practical standpoint. I grant you that this is what many people believe to be the case, but nonetheless, it's incorrect. This may be one of the reasons why Microsoft is launching the education campaign: to counter falsehoods like the one you've relayed.

At any rate, Kevin Gonzalez uploaded a work print of The Hulk to a P2P network. He did this not for money; perhaps he was part of the scene or he just did it because he thinks information should be free. He was sentenced to six months of home confinement. William Fitzgerald was a fellow who traded warez via IRC; his mistake was making them available on his web server. Again, not for money. Nonetheless, he got four months in prison and four months in home confinement. Then there was Operation Buccaneer, which targeted some of the warez rings (again: amateur warez traders, not bootleggers!) and handed out jail sentences of 18 to 46 months. That's almost four years for non-commercial warez trading.

The "you have to sell it for it to be criminal infringement" is one of those Slashdot memes that will never go away (your post is indeed already 4, informative when it's quite simply incorrect, while this correction will likely languish at 2 or lower). We'll continue to tell each other this, and we'll want it to be true. But the fact remains that Gonzalez and the rest did the jail time. Microsoft will actually be doing a disservice to teens if they don't explain the hard realities of copyright law.

all your posts are belong to us (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414170)

"However, by posting, uploading, inputting, providing or submitting ("Posting") your Submission you are granting Microsoft, its affiliated companies and necessary sublicensees permission to use your Submission in connection with the operation of their Internet businesses (including, without limitation, all Microsoft Services), including, without limitation, the license rights to: copy, distribute, transmit, publicly display, publicly perform, reproduce, edit, translate and reformat your Submission; to publish your name in connection with your Submission; and the right to sublicense such rights to any supplier of the Services.

No compensation will be paid with respect to the use of your Submission, as provided herein. Microsoft is under no obligation to post or use any Submission you may provide and Microsoft may remove any Submission at any time in its sole discretion."

Re:all your posts are belong to us (4, Insightful)

jonfr (888673) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414418)

I am pretty sure that this is an theft. Because Microsoft is taking the rights away from the creator of the art in question (ring tones for example. They hid this type of bullshit in there Eula, not in plain sight, but deep in there Eula and hope that nobody notices this type of clause.

Social network sites (Facebook, MySpace, etc) also do this, that is why my profiles on there is mostly empty.

But in short, this is an corporation theft, but they hide behind lawyers and some shadow explanations on this crap in there Eula. They don't tell kids about this stuff on there copyright web page. It doesn't fit them to tell them the truth, that they are making money on kids creations.

I hope that this web page of there goes to /dev/null and never returns.

Re:Duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414180)

FTSummaryMyBytes

Correction: MSBites.

The Gospel According To Bill... (4, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413628)

Urgh.

I have no problems at all with educating kids on copyright law (at about the same time that other civics classes are taught), but this just reeks of propaganda.

/P

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (5, Funny)

croddy (659025) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413644)

Eduganda?

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (1)

GeekZilla (398185) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413754)

Damnit! Where are my mod points? :) That was funny!

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22413816)

If that caught on, i'd certainly feel bad for Uganda.

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (3, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413658)

As long as the course also teaches about ethical business practices and fair play, and about how abusive monopolies can create a situation where the consumer receives very expensive and sub-par products. Students could get hands-on use with laptops sold as Vista-capable in late 2006 actually running Vista as an example of just this sort of thing.

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (1)

Adambomb (118938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413850)

This is entirely the problems. Given that theres a simpsons for everything:

"When I grow up I want to go to Bovine University!".

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413856)

As long as the course also teaches about ethical business practices and fair play, and about how abusive monopolies can create a situation where the consumer receives very expensive and sub-par products.

Somehow I don't quite see that happening. I sincerely doubt that they even get around to mentioning "fair use" (save a quick mention in passing), let alone "fair play".

/P

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (1)

milsoRgen (1016505) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413950)

I have no problems at all with educating kids on copyright law
Totally, keyword being educate, I mean I'm only 24 but daaaaaaamn I swear kids are much more blatantly ignorant or downright idiotic then I can recall >10 years ago.

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414004)

Greater then 10 years ago?

No, older people just don't recognize *their* ignorance.

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (5, Informative)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413984)

From the terms of use:

Microsoft does not claim ownership of the materials you provide to Microsoft (including feedback and suggestions) or post, upload, input or submit to any Services or its associated services for review by the general public, or by the members of any public or private community, (each a "Submission" and collectively "Submissions"). However, by posting, uploading, inputting, providing or submitting ("Posting") your Submission you are granting Microsoft, its affiliated companies and necessary sublicensees permission to use your Submission in connection with the operation of their Internet businesses (including, without limitation, all Microsoft Services), including, without limitation, the license rights to: copy, distribute, transmit, publicly display, publicly perform, reproduce, edit, translate and reformat your Submission; to publish your name in connection with your Submission; and the right to sublicense such rights to any supplier of the Services.

No compensation will be paid with respect to the use of your Submission, as provided herein. Microsoft is under no obligation to post or use any Submission you may provide and Microsoft may remove any Submission at any time in its sole discretion.

No "Abstinence-only" education (5, Funny)

wpegden (931091) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414036)

I have no problems with educating kids on copyright law, so long as it's done correctly. In particular, I am opposed to "abstinence only" education. While it is true that abstaining from file sharing is an effective deterrent to its harmful effects (financial ruin, bankruptcy, incarceration if the RIAA gets its way), studies have shown that students in abstinence-only copyright education classes aren't any less likely to download copyrighted materials. Therefore, classes should also cover "safer" downloading practices, which effectively avoid the scrutiny of law-enforcement and reduce chances of being the victim of harmful effects of file-sharing. The use of encrypted connections and anonymizing networks such as Tor [eff.org] , and basic techniques used to procure copyrighted material from newsgroups rather than insecure p2p protocols, etc., would all be covered in a well designed cirriculum.

Re:No "Abstinence-only" education (1)

Trintech (1137007) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414560)

Am I the only one who wasn't thinking about filesharing when reading the phrase "abstinence only education"? Hmm... maybe I just haven't /.ed enough but I guess I am now against all abstinence only education programs (see, this post isn't off topic :P)

Re:The Gospel According To Bill... (1)

CheshireDragon (1183095) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414270)

I agree. *give M$ gun* *places M$ foot in front of barrel* Now, I am going to wait for this site to become a pirate haven. As for the first comment of the entire news story: I used to be "scared" into jail time when I was a young teen, but now I'll say "wait a sec." and then go look it up. Now, whether I call BS or not depends on what I find.

No dark sarcasm in the classroom ... (2, Insightful)

thrillseeker (518224) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413630)

...All in all you're just another brick in the wall

Re:No dark sarcasm in the classroom ... (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413826)

Another nice quote from the same band that seems appropriate here - From Dogs of War:

Discovery is to be disowned.
How do you think that would jive in MS 101?

It will backfire (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413648)

All this will do is teach the kids IP is a corporate crock to be obliterated when they are in power, and open doors to possibilities about 'free' stuff they never even thought of.

What they should do is try to give value to purchasing a right to use, not just trying to scare kids.

Pot, kettle, black! (2, Informative)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414392)

What about the wider subject of ethics? Pretty handy for MS to focus only on the area that is of interest to them while acting like complete bastards in other areas (offence to bastards unintended).

Music, Videos, Programs will always be copied. (0, Troll)

phillips321 (955784) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413656)

I know that copying music is illegal, so will the kids before this and after this. We all know copying music is illegal, why try to educate me more on something i care to know little about. I know it's wrong, that's enough for me.

Note to the MPAA: This statement does not indicate that I copy music, purely that I know it's illegal ;)

Re:Music, Videos, Programs will always be copied. (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413738)

Ya know it's not illegal right?

Seems the education campaigns are already working.

You just made me laugh. (4, Insightful)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413762)

I know that copying music is illegal... I know it's wrong, that's enough for me.

See, that's the difference between the sheeple and informed people. You really don't know it's wrong. You've just been educated to think it's wrong.

As for me, I know that copying music is illegal in some countries, but I know it's NOT wrong - specially if the RIAA engages in monopolistic behavior.

Reality isn't black and white, my friend. And it doesn't have shades of gray either, that would be thinking in 1-D. Reality comes in COLORS. Some nice, some ugly. And there are many viewpoints.

Re:You just made me laugh. (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413832)

Umm, in which countries is it illegal dude?

Seriously. If you know which countries actually arrest people for "copying music", I'd like to hear it.

Re:You just made me laugh. (2, Insightful)

gnick (1211984) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413964)

You really don't know it's wrong.
Would you be more comfortable with "Copying music feels wrong"? Artists deserve to be compensated for their work. I agree that illegally copying music isn't always immoral, but you'd have to be pretty convincing to persuade me that it's never immoral - If you're telling yourself that stealing music is part of your personal stand against the RIAA, I think that you're probably deluding yourself. Hopefully you at least endorse your bands of choice through concerts or merchandising if you refuse to pay for their CDs/MP3s. Does that make me one of your "sheeple"?

Re:You just made me laugh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414062)

I believe the parent was saying exactly what you are, that there are many MANY cases where it is not immoral.

Not that ALL are immoral, hence no black and white or even grayscale.

Re:You just made me laugh. (1)

milsoRgen (1016505) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414074)

"if something is important to me ... and someone takes that away from me"

Whooooaaaa slow down little Johnny, IP by it's very nature can't be taken from you, or stolen, at least not in the sense we're talking about here, downloading and making copies. The problem is we have to many people like you see on Leno's Jaywalking. If they can't remember who the last vice president was, how can you expect them to even begin to grasp the concept of intellectual property and make an informed opinion on the matter. The general populace seems to be less able to sort out 'marketing speak' and loaded questions then ever before.

Re:Music, Videos, Programs will always be copied. (1)

weorthe (666189) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414160)

I know that copying music is illegal, so will the kids before this and after this. We all know copying music is illegal, why try to educate me more on something i care to know little about. I know it's wrong, that's enough for me.

According to a poll on the site, 95% of respondents think they should be allowed to copy a CD they've purchased as many times as they want.

whaddya wanna bet? (1)

bonkeydcow (1186443) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413676)

I bet microsoft ends up owning your content on their website, just like http://www.flickr.com/ [flickr.com] .

Re:whaddya wanna bet? (3, Informative)

Digi-John (692918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413838)

According to the Terms of Service at the bottom of the page, by posting pictures to flickr you give them a license to use said pictures in the promotion of the site. From the ToS: Yahoo! does not claim ownership of Content you submit or make available for inclusion on the Service..
Giving a license != giving ownership.

Silverlight??? (0, Flamebait)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414024)

I have not RTFA and I certainly won't take advantage of MS's education opportunity, but I suspect Silverlight will be part of this mess.

Re:Silverlight??? (1)

milsoRgen (1016505) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414096)

but I suspect Silverlight will be part of this mess.
Actually no. I was surpised to and I recommend checking out the interview section, good for a laugh...

Copyright ringtones (1)

aembleton (324527) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413678)

If I were to upload a track by an RIAA artist to that MyBytes site, and it converts it to a ringtone, then I guess Microsoft will be an accessory to copyright theft/stealing/infringement. It might have some algorithms to help protect from that, but then you could sample other tracks.

RIAA vs Microsoft over shitty ringtones. Watch the sparks fly :)

Re:Copyright ringtones (1)

hardburn (141468) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414498)

IIRC, the RIAA only deals with the copyright on the end recording. Copyrights are held separately for lyrics and actual melody, and are prosecuted by a separate group (though probably with a lot of the same people on both).

But basically, yes, I see Microsoft's site getting itself sued by someone over a bunch of "Fergalicious" ringtones.

same old tecniques (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22413682)

Looks like something from the past "Backed by a study that says shopkeepers show more respect for mafia when told of possible accidents for not accepting the insurance, The mafia inc. is launching a new ...."

Someday Microsoft's customer base (1)

FromTheAir (938543) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413698)

Someday Microsoft's customer base will use Microsoft software to organize themselves and exert collective control over Micorosft. The customer bases of most large companies will eventually take over the companies and choose the Board of directors and hire and fire management and set quality standards and profit margins.

The citizens will also take over their governments..

Re:Someday Microsoft's customer base (4, Funny)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413724)

The 19th century called. They want their Communist Manifesto back.

I wanna be copyright! (3, Funny)

quinnanya (1081787) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413704)

When you create a profile, one of the avatars you can pick is a copyright symbol.

Re:I wanna be copyright! (1)

GeekZilla (398185) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413784)

You know, I thought you were kidding. I'm thinking, "hee-hee. That's pretty silly." :-P

Then I went to MyBytes.

You were serious.

I... don't know what to say.

you know (1)

rastoboy29 (807168) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413748)

Why on Earth does Microsoft care about this?

Are their interests so absolutely identical to Hollywood's?  I mean really?

And do they "lose" so much from "piracy" of their software that it warrants this type of douchegaggish behavoir?

Re:you know (1)

Cheesey (70139) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414378)

Surely everyone who makes software should care about IP rights? Even the Free Software Foundation get pissed if you violate one of their IP licenses, e.g. distribute copyrighted software without adhering to the GPLv2 licensing agreement.

Microsoft Miseducation (tm) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22413758)

Microsoft appear to be under impression that copyright applies to ideas,
in which case they would be the worlds most prominent serial copyright
infringer. Lucky for Microsoft then that this isn't the case.

There was a childs film-making competition a few years back organised
by first light in the UK where Microsoft sponsorship came with "ideas
can be copyrighted" nonsense. The other week we saw them repeat the same
bullshit in relation to Canadian copyright legislation. And now this?

The last people qualified to teach anyone about copyright is Microsoft.
From "copyrightable ideas" to stamping all over fair use with DRM,
they've demonstrated that they neither understand or respect copyright
law.

Re:Microsoft Miseducation (tm) (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414376)

...they've demonstrated that they neither understand or respect copyright law.


Oh, they not only respect copyright law, they practically worship it. Of course, that's only when they hold the copyright.

Corporate Cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22413778)

As with all of Microsoft's forays in to the world of "hip" computing, I'm sure this will be a winner. They just need to make an introduction video with a token black guy, homosexual, and two teen girls... and then cripple the service.

"Preserve our business model OR ELSE" 101 (4, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413802)

In the beginning, there were computers... the hardware... the software was free. People were paid to write programs, but the programs weren't sold "as a product without guarantees." Then Bill Gates said "let there be profit where there was none!" And so there was.

And it came to pass that there was wailing and gnashing of teeth while Microsoft made billions upon billions of dollars and a monopoly was built.

And it came to pass that while open source and free software was never really gone, but it has regained popularity as much of the afore mentioned wailing and gnashing goes on. And as open source and industries using it gained popularity, there were flying chairs as well.

There are other ways to get your computers to deliver the results you want and it doesn't have to cost any money. Microsoft doesn't want anyone to know that so they'll frighten kids with fire and brimstone to protect their business model. Brilliant! But should Microsoft be teaching religion in schools? What they SHOULD be teaching is their programmers to write safe and secure code.

Re:"Preserve our business model OR ELSE" 101 (2, Insightful)

Shaterri (253660) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414052)

In the beginning, there were computers... the hardware... the software was free. People were paid to write programs, but the programs weren't sold "as a product without guarantees." Then Bill Gates said "let there be profit where there was none!" And so there was.
...ummm, were you actually coding back then? I hate to break this to you, but by propagating (bit by bit, and admittedly occasionally by accident) the concept of a common computing environment with well-defined, public (and mostly-open) APIs and by encouraging the commoditization of computing, Bill Gates has probably done more to ensure the development of more free software than anyone else in the history of computing...

Re:"Preserve our business model OR ELSE" 101 (4, Insightful)

pipatron (966506) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414116)

Bill Gates has probably done more to ensure the development of more free software than anyone else

Well, what would the Bible be without the Devil...

Re:"Preserve our business model OR ELSE" 101 (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414130)

...which is why more people are running insecure OSes and apps than anyone could have predicted 20 years ago and why those who are trying to escape B.Gate's unified utopia is moving as far away from Microsoft as possible?

If you think anyone other than IBM had anything to do with commoditization of computing, I'd say you're over-estimating what Microsoft actually does and what they actually did. I think if people dig into what Microsoft has contributed, you'd be hard pressed to find even a SINGLE thing they originally conceived or created... and they even initially dismissed many critical and important technologies that are at the core of computing technology today. I'd argue they do more to retard development than encourage it.

Re:"Preserve our business model OR ELSE" 101 (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414608)

Microsoft doesn't want anyone to know that so they'll frighten kids with fire and brimstone to protect their business model. Brilliant!

If they, or anyone else, do make inroads, I expect much of their success will go the way of the Just Say No or abstinence programs, but not before bits of it start infiltrating the educational system.

Maybe what they need to is start earlier. Instead of allowing kindergarten teachers to instruct little Jimmy that sharing is A Good Thing, and that people who don't share are rude and bad people, teachers can be mandated to offer pedagogical instruction on the various licensing alternatives available so little Jimmy can protect his toys from little Susie and little Bobby, and that nutty sandal-wearing kids who insists on giving stuff to everyone that asks.

Reminding or otherwise educating people of your "in the beginning" points would go a long way, but then you'd still be faced with general ignorance of the "in the beginning" principles of copyright law (not to mention the apathy that comes with identifying oneself as a "consumer"). You'd also have to stave off the content industry from confusing the issues or otherwise mucking things up for everyone while they struggle for relevance and control.

It's an uphill battle, but in the end, we tend to get what we deserve. That's a cynic's way of saying that educating is probably the only answer. When a politician stands up and says "IP infringment is the single greatest threat to our economy", I don't blame Microsoft, or those lining the politician's pockets, but the ordinary folks who, by not knowing any better, allowed this to happen.

What makes a man turn neutral? (1)

delorean79 (1096429) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413814)

What makes a man turn neutral? Lust for gold? Power? Or were you just born with a heart full of neutrality?... If I die while writing this reply, tell my wife...hello.

re- (1)

ihatethetv (935399) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413844)

I think they mean re-education ("therapy" a la A Clockwork Orange). BTW: I hope none of the ringtones they "create" sound too much like anything hollywood puts out. They might then get a first-hand lesson in IP (like the Verve with Bittersweet Symphony). -g

Doing things to escape punishment (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413848)

I have never found mere escape of punishment to be a good reason to do anything. I admit it can be motivation, but not a reason.

Meanwhile, in other news ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413852)

... MyBytes site users elect to release their content under the GPL.

Re:Meanwhile, in other news ... (1)

space_biker (229319) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414218)

What they're saying is: "We won't share our stuff with you, but you should share your stuff with us." What kind of double standard is that?

User Poll (5, Informative)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413854)

Hey all, the current poll available on mybytes [mybytes.com] is:

How many times should you be allowed to burn a copy of a CD that you purchased?
Zero
One or two
Three to seven
As many as I like; I own it.
I think you know what to do...

Re:User Poll (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414156)

Mod parent up!

It's working! 95% of the votes so far are for "As many as I like; I own it."

And I think we can safely say we now pwn that poll.

Alternative Methods? (1)

dasunst3r (947970) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413862)

Instead of talking about the possible punishments, I would rather use arguments like:
1. "How would YOU like it if..." (fairness)
2. "Paying for ___ is exercising your dollar votes. By paying, you are establishing that ___ is good and is worthy of your support." (respect)

Re:Alternative Methods? (2, Interesting)

emjay88 (1178161) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414530)

1. "How would YOU like it if..." (fairness)
MyBytes lets you choose whether the songs you create are "free" or "restricted". This has no effect on whether other users can download/remix/use your song. You can then see how many people are paying for (or not) the use of your song.
From http://www.mybytes.com/help.html [mybytes.com]

All users have the choice to either pay or not pay credits for songs they take, just like in real life. You'll get to see if other users like your tracks, and if they're giving you credit for using your creation.
That sounds like "How would YOU like it if..."

COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS KILLING PC GAMING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22413868)

We pulled some disturbing numbers this past week about the amount of PC players currently playing CoD4 Multiplayer (which was fantastic). What wasn't fantastic was the percentage of those numbers who were playing on stolen copies of the game on stolen / cracked CD keys of pirated copies (and that was only people playing online).

Not sure if I can share the exact numbers or percentage of PC players with you, but I'll check and see; if I can I'll update with them. As the amount of people who pirate PC games is astounding. It blows me away at the amount of people willing to steal games (or anything) simply because it's not physical or it's on the safety of the internet to do.

Re:COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS KILLING PC GAMING (1)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414240)

Bullshit, its not doing anything to gaming, certainly not killing it...you even said it yourself...

"...amount of PC players currently playing CoD4 Multiplayer (which was fantastic)."

What it may be doing is reducing the size of the large gaming developement studios... and in many cases thats no real loss, its not like creating a video game costs much money ($300 for a Desktop at DEll or whatever, done), you can get hundreds of people to Beta test "just for fun", and distribution is essentially free with the internet, if its a successful enough game, you could sell it (as in the right to distirbute) to gaming magazines and even make back profit, not to mention donations, and awards/grants etc.

Re:COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS KILLING PC GAMING (1)

ewhac (5844) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414394)

So, let me get this straight: Your über-133t h4xor-pr00f crypto-strength CD keys are being cracked or reverse-engineered, and your very expensive authentication server farms with very expensive redundant bandwidth are accepting them and allowing people to play the unsanctioned copies online? In other words, are you telling me that the CD authentication key, as a concept in itself, was a complete and utter waste of your time?

Sympathy, why dost thou elude me?

Not sure if I can share the exact numbers or percentage of PC players with you,

Hmm. Gee. Why is it that, every time we seem to get within spitting distance of actual, verifiable numbers, all the publishers suddenly clam up and say, "Ooo, uh, gosh, we can't share that with you."

Look, if you have a case to make, make it. Screw your "confidentiality agreements" and present the data. Allow it to be inspected, torn apart, and verified. And then, once actual hard data is in play (as opposed to shrill histrionics), we can work on solving the actual problem, as it actually presents itself.

Schwab

The alternatives... (1)

D-Cypell (446534) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413880)

I wonder how much of this Microsoft sponsered curriculum with cover public licensing.

Unfortunately, as a true slashdotter I am single with no kids, but if it were one of my kids that were being put through this indoctrination, I will give them a quick overview of the creative commons license and suggest that they applied it to all their uploaded content. Wouldn't that be interesting!

and so... (1)

mugnyte (203225) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413890)

Children are thus raised to squeal and squawk whenever anyone seems to be "stealing IP" - which not only implies they dont copy games, music, etc. but in that they report infringement whenever they see it (parents, schools, comrades, jobs).

  Years later, when every copy of every commercial product is dutifully paid for, more people than ever will be clamoring for alternatives to the expensive world of vendor-dictated pricing, feature and upgrade schedules.

  And so, this generation will adopt FOSS earlier, knowing that their new laptop cannot handle [MS OS du jour] and they cannot buy new hardware, and [now] they dont want to "steal" some IP. "No! I would never steal IP! Thats why I use free stuff - its legal."

  This can been seen a welcome thing for FOSS, as it really nails home that commercial software is gonna cost ya.

Re:and so... (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413942)

ya dreaming. What would happen if all this IP propaganda was actually effective is that eventually this generation would discover FOSS and think it is "just wrong" because it "doesn't reward artists" and all sorts of other clap-trap that they have been taught. Some of this generation might become congressmen and happily pass laws that make FOSS impractical or impossible.

Re:and so... (1)

nexuspal (720736) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413996)

Nice, the more the push for the profits, the more attractive open source is. How can you keep growing at 10% a year without increasing prices, and as they increase the prices the "alternative" (free open source) becomes that much more attractive. Microsoft's strategy now is, get everyone to pay a little and often (which will come into frutition within the next 5 or 6 years)... OR/AND get rid of the competition! Which they have already alluded to through IP litigation.

Not in public schools, please (5, Interesting)

LoadWB (592248) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413922)

Just keep this crap away from public schools. This is the type of corporate propaganda that belongs in marketing, advertisements, and sponsored events. NOT in a tax-supported educational system.

And screw them all:

1) I not only make digital copies of software media, but I will happily provide a replacement to friends, family, or customers who lose theirs. Why? Because its the PRODUCT KEY which makes the magic, NOT the CD.

1a) I am sensitive, however, to certain products which just require media from a previous version to qualify for an upgrade. I do not just "hand out" copies; you have to prove to me that you legitimately own the product. And I am quite fond of saying "NO."

2) I make copies of my CDs in VBR MP3 format for use on my portable devices and home computers.

3) I rip and convert my DVDs for use on my portable devices.

Oh, and I do not always put caps back on pens, fold or hang my laundry, and every once in a while I also use the last of the toilet paper without replacing it.

I also do not use a single bit of pirated or unpaid software (I would say "unregistered," but there are a few free packages like RealPlayer I refuse to register due to spam issues.) No, really. But sometimes I wish I did, as it seems the pirates have fewer hurdles through which to jump and are able to spend more time enjoying software than dealing with licensing issues.

Re:Not in public schools, please (1)

LoadWB (592248) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413968)

Oh, and I forgot, "Don't Copy That Floppy" and "Home Taping is Killing Music."

Re:Not in public schools, please (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414046)

You refuse to help friends and family?

Is your loyalty to the copyright holder and the copyright system really worth betraying your Mom?

You sicken me.

Re:Not in public schools, please (1)

Shadolite (966823) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414380)

I also do not use a single bit of pirated or unpaid software (I would say "unregistered," but there are a few free packages like RealPlayer I refuse to register due to spam issues.) No, really. But sometimes I wish I did, as it seems the pirates have fewer hurdles through which to jump and are able to spend more time enjoying software than dealing with licensing issues.
So pay for the software, and then jump through the pirate hurdles.

Re:Not in public schools, please (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414386)

3) I rip and convert my DVDs for use on my portable devices.

...

I also do not use a single bit of pirated or unpaid software (I would say "unregistered," but there are a few free packages like RealPlayer I refuse to register due to spam issues.) No, really.

Then you may be splitting hairs on your definition of "pirated". You're certainly using the DVDs outside of the terms of your license. Are you ready to tell kids, without qualifying any of your statements, that they should thumb their noses at the DMCA, regardless of the consequences?

Re:Not in public schools, please (1)

JonathanR (852748) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414574)

You're certainly using the DVDs outside of the terms of your license.
Since when was there a licence agreement when you purchase a DVD? I would have thought when buying a DVD, that you've purchased a copy of the work through a licenced distribution network. Thus you are bound only by the restrictions imposed by copyright law. You have no contractual relationship with the copyright holder, only an obligation to be law-abiding.

Irony (2, Interesting)

Alcoholic Synonymous (990318) | more than 6 years ago | (#22413952)

MS pushing copyright education (and the whole WGA thing) is somewhat ironic when you consider MS owes their monopoly almost entirely to piracy. And buy pushing this agenda, they actually are more at risk of pushing the install base to "get legal" with more economical alternatives (i.e. Linux).

Had MS not been the required platform for gaming through the 90s, users would have been less likely to become familiar and congregate around it. Since home users constantly needed the new whiz-bang DirectX or 32-bit OS support to keep gaming, and the shear ease by which your average person lost the OEM install disc, the number of pirated systems grew. When it came time for the hardware upgrade, they got another copy of Windows with the box, and then a year later, pirated another version of Windows over it to keep up with the new gaming features again. For every $5 lost OEM install (C'mon, who really goes out and buys a copy of Windows?), they made a few $50 sales of Age of Empires or Halo, or a $300 (never actually priced it) sale of Office. So MS owes perhaps the majority of its install base to pirate upgrades.

Had Vista not been such ass to deal with, almost certainly no one would be using XP today regardless of how awful it is. In one sense, it would just be a lot more logical for MS to declare Windows Home editions free for home use and keep that install base not looking over their shoulders and not learning about alternatives.

Do they tell you how to work the OEM / CAL / coa / (2, Interesting)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414000)

Do they tell you how to work the OEM / CAL / coa / ETC rules that some IT people have a hard time working them selfs?

I'm all for it (4, Funny)

bgfay (5362) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414010)

As a high school teacher I'm all for this program.

That's why I downloaded it over bittorrent, made fifty copies and am selling the curriculum to other teachers for $50 a copy (digital). I'm so glad that Microsoft has found a way for me to make some money.

Thank you MS. You guys are the greatest!

not my kid, thank you (1)

wardk (3037) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414032)

Microsoft can leave it's grubby slime-caked mitts off my child.

MS education

what an oxymoron

So, the king of IP thieves... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414044)

Is now playing IP defender/educator.

I guess it would have a ring of reality to it if Microsoft had changed its ways. However, it hasn't so this is farcical.

What about FOSS (1)

EEPROMS (889169) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414094)

Education isnt just about teaching people about the law but also showing them solutions that fit their lifestyle. What would you bet that the Microsoft rep never mentions to the students that rather than breaking the law and stealing proprietary software they could download a FOSS solution and avoid all legal entanglements.

guaranteed to increase infringement (3, Insightful)

owlnation (858981) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414106)

So...

When a grown-up told you that something was naughty what was the first thing you did when their back was turned?

Exactly. Expect copyright infringement to grow exponentially as a direct result of this MS program.

But who will teach them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414120)

History is rife with Microsoft's violations of others' IP. I am not even going to start a list of incidents - Google it!

The whole point is: do as I do, not as I say. The single biggest thing Microsoft could do if they want IP respected is to lead by example. A short century or two of exemplary behavior should be enough to undo their past.

maybe not so bad, but probably is (1)

qw0ntum (831414) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414154)

I wouldn't be so quick to judge this MyBytes site. I'd first give it some thought, before I recognize it as the typical media industry propaganda. It's interesting, however, to look at their model. Kids can "release" their tracks under "Free" licenses, even if they require people to pay for them. They also get to select what "rules" they believe media should be distributed under, with it looks like choices running the whole spectrum of "I bought it, it's mine and I can do what I want with it" to "It's wrong (morally) to share CD's".

While I hear the infernal tune [youtube.com] in the background of this site, this site could be an interesting experiment. It keeps track of how many people download the songs without paying for them (with site credits, not money), and how many people pay for "free" tracks (among other things). I'm going to laugh real hard when their "anti-piracy" curriculum winds up teaching the media industry that people will actually pay for music that they're able to use as they desire.

I'd really like to play with this site some more, but it seems like you need IE to create a login or do downloads. Maybe my version of Flash is just out of date...

Sadly, this works (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414164)

Look at the laws we have about our roads today. Things like jaywalking now exist because the automotive industry wanted to educate children that the street is a place for cars and not for playing.

Fines are just as bad. (1)

Besna (1175279) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414204)

In jail you have health care, for example.

let MS waste their money (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414236)

it won't do any good.

the cat is already out of the bag. kids today KNOW about ip rights. you think they don't? ha! really - HA! they know far more than you do, you cigar smoking fat old useless overpaid mafiaa guy.

the 'just say no to drugs' also had a real laugh of an impact on youth. they still do as they wish, just like when I was growing up all those decades ago. we were smart enough to know when we were being fed a line of bull and kids today are smarter, not dumber. at least street smarter; and that's what detects MS and the riaa/mpaa bullshit.

they saw my generation buy LP (well, they heard about it) and they saw us re-buy CD and then be told to re-buy the MP3. they can SEE, you idiots, they can see this all. and they have decided, apparently, to snub their noses at the fat cats.

I actually LIKE the fact that the youth are seen as 'lawless' toward IP. good! IP theory is stupid anyway and needs to be totally rethought.

imaginary property that you must pay for over and over again. farking absurd - and kids today know it.

have fun MS. throw money around. it means you have less left over. and that's certainly a good thing, isn't it?

A new trend? (1)

Bipedal Shark (1210600) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414250)

Oh boy, corporate-sponsored propaganda taught in schools! I wonder who's going to jump at the opportunity to teach students which soft drink is best? Oh wait, I think that's whoever buys ad time on Channel 1.

Mr Garrison says... (1)

S1mmo+61 (1125433) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414272)

Copying software is bad, mmmkay?

Important Type (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414274)

Microsoft has launched MyBytes,

It's supposed to read MS Bytes

Poll #8 is missing an option (1)

kindbud (90044) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414288)

http://www.mybytes.com/polls.html [mybytes.com]

You're stranded on a desert island. Which device couldn't you live without?

  1. Computer
  2. Cell phone
  3. MP3 player
  4. Video camera



Ummm, if I were stranded on a desert island, the one device I'd wish to have was a 406Mhz PLB or EPIRB. I mean, come on.

MYBYTES Terms & Conditions (1)

TheDreadedGMan (1122791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414312)

More FUD from the TOU document:

What about fair use?

In limited situations, you can use copyrighted works without permission from the copyright holder. It can be difficult to figure out whether use of copyrighted works without permission is legal, though, because the laws in this area are often vague and vary from country to country.

The copyright law in the United States has a doctrine called "fair use". Fair use provides a defense to copyright infringement in some circumstances. For example, fair use allows documentary filmmakers to use very short clips of copyrighted movies, music and news footage without permission from the copyright owner. Fair use is a difficult concept because determining whether something is a fair use involves weighing four factors. Unfortunately, weighing the fair use factors rarely results in a clear-cut answer.

Rather than applying a fair use test, many other countries have specific exceptions to copyright infringement. The number and type of exceptions vary by country, but they frequently allow copyrighted materials to be used without permission from the copyright holder for activities such as nonprofit research, teaching, news reporting, or private study.

If you incorrectly decide that something is a fair use or falls into an exception to copyright infringement, you could be held criminally and civilly liable and have to pay damages. We suggest you talk to a lawyer if you have questions regarding fair uses of copyrighted works.

Yeah, it could happen! (3, Insightful)

sizzzzlerz (714878) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414382)

Backed by a study that says teens show more respect for copyrights when told of possible jail time for infringement

These are the same teens who are having unprotected sex, smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, driving cars at unsafe speeds, and continuing to indulge in drugs. Maybe if we told them about the consequences of those behaviours, they'd stop doing them as well.

The really annoying and underappreciated angle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22414480)

Is that Microsoft probably wouldn't even have this monopoly (and the all of its attendant benefits) if it weren't for the ease w/ which their software can be pirated. I'd doubt that even half of the home users w/ aftermarket Windows installations actually paid for each copy of it.

Microsoft thinks "freedom" is profanity? (1)

phantomOmega (1226496) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414636)

I tried to register so that I could vote in polls. For my security question, I supplied "freedom" as the answer. Oddly enough, the site returns an error: "Answer contains Profanity!" Is this really just a bug? Note: This answer appears with all of the security questions...

Makes sense (3, Insightful)

Stanislav_J (947290) | more than 6 years ago | (#22414650)

Just like teens will stop using pot when told of possible jail time for toking. How could this possibly not work?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?