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Nanowires Allow For Electricity-Generating Clothing

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the next-step-in-this-direction-is-thermoptic-camoflage dept.

Power 113

lee1 writes "The latest development in the field of 'energy harvesting', which includes such opportunistic technology such as self-winding watches, generators implanted in soldier's boots, and knee brace dynamos, is a cloth that generates electrical power. The cloth is newly developed by scientists in the US, and can produce up to 80 milliwatts per square metre. It is made from brush-like fibres composed of a Kevlar stalk surrounded by zinc oxide nanowire crystals that generate electricity through the piezoelectric effect. They can be grown on any substrate, including hair. The power harnessed from this effect could be used for anything from cosmetic components to the powering of medical devices."

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113 comments

What about... (4, Funny)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423076)

Can it be grown on sharks?
/to power the frickin' laser beams

Re:What about... (1, Insightful)

mh1997 (1065630) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423160)

From the article "The possibility of developing piezoelectric, or energy generating fibres or fabrics has been something that the smart fabrics research community has been speculating about for some time," P>

I guess they are too young to remember wearing a polyester leisure suit and walking across carpeting.

Re:What about... (2)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423298)

Now there's a worry. Would a polyester leisure suit then serve as ECM for devices powered by this nanofabric? Is a polyester suit the new outfit for spies and saboteurs?

A bit dangerous (1)

edsousa (1201831) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423100)

I wouldn't dress it on a rainy day... Bzzzzzzzzt

SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423104)

_0_
\''\
'=o='
.|!|
.| |
give your lover a goatse valentine [goatse.ch]

Re:SLASHDOT SUX0RZ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423416)

If you look deep enough, you can see that he is exposing his heart.

is that the same "up to" my ISP uses? (4, Insightful)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423108)

up to 80 milliwatts ...

Up to 10Mbit/s download speeds

So how much power is that in practice? 5mW PSM? maybe 10 if you're an athlete?

I think I'll stick to batteries, thanks

Re:is that the same "up to" my ISP uses? (1)

badboy_tw2002 (524611) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424172)

How much power is that supposed to have to a team of horses? 20?

Is that when the dang thing works or not? And where do I get the oil from?

You keep your new fangled "combustion engine".

I'll stick to ol' Trigger here, thanks.

Think nuclear (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423110)

I know we all cringe, but nuclear energy really is the future. Small fission devices have the potential to make recharging a thing of the past--we don't even have to wait for fusion. These are good stopgaps until then--they too won't have to be recharged.

Re:Think nuclear (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423186)

I'm holding out for Shipstones(tm) myself :D

Re:Think nuclear (1)

Scruss (1130173) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423362)

I am wondering how this could work with soldiers. Could you possibly harness enough energy to create a coat of armor that could render them invisible. I would like to see some halo armor come from this.

Re:Think nuclear (1)

evilklown (1008863) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424200)

Could you possibly harness enough energy to create a coat of armor that could render them invisible
You forget. This is made of kevlar. For us in the U.S., means that the government won't be able to supply it to soldiers.

Re:Think nuclear (1)

Trails (629752) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424916)

You go to war with the self-powered cloaking armor you have...

I'm with you! (1)

iknownuttin (1099999) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423574)

I'm holding out for Shipstones(tm) myself :D

And nymphomaniac artificial people named after a day in the week.

Re:I'm with you! (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424112)

Friday wasn't a nymphomaniac. True (clinical) nympho's actually don't get any satisfaction from sex.

Shipstones won't help with power (1)

clonan (64380) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425460)

If you recall from "Friday" Shipstones are just extremly good batteries. They provide extremly convinient power storage NOT power creation... ...And I just realized how nerdy I am!

Re:Shipstones won't help with power (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 6 years ago | (#22426170)

Maybe I read it wrong but I coulda swore they used some kind of funky fusion to provide power.

Re:Shipstones won't help with power (1)

clonan (64380) | more than 6 years ago | (#22426226)

They use all sorts of things to power them (like solar from the deserts).

Remeber the orbital subway system from "The moon is a harsh mistress"? They stored the power used to launch the cab in shipstones. They were recharged when the cab was slowed at the destination.

Re:Shipstones won't help with power (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 6 years ago | (#22426336)

The Heinlein Concordance says it was solar power, so yeah I guess it was just a bad-ass battery.

Re:Think nuclear (2, Funny)

robertjw (728654) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424636)

I'm cringing. There is NO WAY I'm wearing nuclear clothes.

I might wear nuclear clothers... (1)

clonan (64380) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425524)

...with a lead cup!

Don't hug me bro! (5, Funny)

barocco (1168573) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423120)

Don't hug me bro!

BOO THIS MAN!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423954)

Boo, I say!

Their first attempts were a complete failure (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423132)

The nanowire bath towels were a shocking failure.

Proper marketing will be needed to overcome consumer resistance.

Is that really a good idea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423740)

> The nanowire bath towels were a shocking failure.
> Proper marketing will be needed to overcome consumer resistance.

If they can manage that, I'm sure the results will be electrifying.
People will be shocked by what you can do with them.

Re:Their first attempts were a complete failure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22424094)

The nanowire bath towels were a shocking failure.

Was that because of the mild electric shock or the tumors?

Re:Their first attempts were a complete failure (1)

shawn(at)fsu (447153) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424302)

Towelie: "Don't for get to bring a towel"

Re:Their first attempts were a complete failure (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424546)

I think it is the conductivity of the consumer that is the problem.

forgive my ignorance (4, Insightful)

Bandman (86149) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423140)

Wouldn't harnessing this energy make the material harder to move in?

Re:forgive my ignorance (3, Informative)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423360)

Not necessarily. You waste a lot of energy moving your clothing around as-is; the fabric would likely be a little stiffer, but that's probably about it--they're not making the whole thing out of kevlar, apparently.

Re:forgive my ignorance (1)

mtmra70 (964928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423454)

So you loose weight while you generate electricity!

Re:forgive my ignorance (1)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423488)

At 80 milliwatts per square meter you'd be looking at less than the difference asking for extra starch at the cleaners gives you.

Re:forgive my ignorance (4, Informative)

orclevegam (940336) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423660)

Wouldn't harnessing this energy make the material harder to move in?
Actually, in the case of the knee-brace generator it makes it easier to move. The knee-brace has a clutch mechanism that only engages on the absorption portion of the step (when your knee is flexing to absorb the impact and transfer your weight) so the resistance of the brace actually helps your legs absorb the impact of stepping. The only problem with the current model is that it's rather bulky and heavy so until it's made lighter it makes it harder to move just from the weight of it. There are lots of ways this could be used to actually improve efficiency (much like active-braking generators in cars) rather than decrease it. Remember, all friction heat and to a lesser extent gravity (falling down a gravity well) is wasted energy, recapturing as much as possible helps cut down on entropy.

Re:forgive my ignorance (1)

Noodly Appendage (1174865) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423762)

The energy that surrounds us in even square micrometer is astounding, this is just an attempt to tap it.

Re:forgive my ignorance (1)

Bandman (86149) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425956)

The real coup will be with zero-point energy

Re:forgive my ignorance (1)

berwiki (989827) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423836)

you're right, genius!
force those couch-potatoes to power their own TV's!
everyone will be fit in no time!

Re:forgive my ignorance (5, Funny)

Hillgiant (916436) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424048)

Dude! Just how fat are you to be able to power your TV with 80 milliWatts per m^2?

Re:forgive my ignorance; me, too... (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424482)

Wouldn't use of this material make it harder to travel through airports, train stations and similar in the US or US-co-opted EU nations...?

What will this mean (if anything) for DSDs (data storage devices)?

And, how much juice will be generated and discharged when wearers (become engage in heavily-mechanical, mind-blowing frottage (frotteurism)(consensual or not)? Will it be "shocking" and/or "scentillating"

(captcha: "eagerly")

Re:forgive my ignorance (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424724)

Yes. Unless this cloth produces less sound or heat than normal cloth when moved, you are technically right. If it produces the same sound and heat, the energy MUST come from somewhere.

Funny thing though. (1, Insightful)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423148)

Washing the shirt will ruin it.

can they make it into a sail? (1)

GungaDan (195739) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423168)

How's the power generation scale with size?

What we really need... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423180)

... is a way to generate electricity by masturbation. I could probably power my data center... and maybe yours too!

Re:What we really need... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22425910)

Brings new meaning to the term "Power User"...

Re:What we really need... (1)

kaizokuace (1082079) | more than 6 years ago | (#22427530)

more like power abuser!

Nano-generation Decision Point (4, Insightful)

Phoenix666 (184391) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423208)

Self-winding watches are great, because you don't have to do any extra work to wind them; they wind themselves according to the work you already do raising and lowering your arm (weight of the watch notwithstanding). Knee braces and such, though, break that model, because you have to do more physical work to generate the power.

There is a lot of passive mechanical energy in our environment that can be harvested to generate power. But it has to make economical sense. If you can coat your house in nano piezoelectric filaments that generate twice the current that they cost, then good. Otherwise, why bother?

Re:Self-winding watches (2, Informative)

InterGuru (50986) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423474)

Self winding watches do take extra energy. Every time you move your wrist you expend energy to set the winding mechanism going.

The amount of energy is so small as to be trivial and unnoticeable.

I suspect that 80 milliwatt per square meter is also unnoticeable, as we expend several hundred watts in ordinary motion.

When we worship philosophers, simply because they are philosophers, and denigrate plumbers simply because they are plumbers, we will soon find that neither our theories nor our pipes hold water.

Re:Nano-generation Decision Point (0, Offtopic)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423522)

Why bother? Because cost doesn't seem to be an issue with the ecofriendly crowd that want alternative energy in use. If it costs 5 cents per kilowatt over 10 years or $5.00, it doesn't matter because they said it needs to happen and you will pay for it anyways if it is the only thing available.

And if there are people too cheap to pay the extra, then demonize them, complain and cause the cost of regular energy to increase to a point there is a trade off with regulations and such then get mad at the government for a failing economy when energy costs are sucking all the extra money out of it.

Re:Nano-generation Decision Point (4, Insightful)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424082)

Why bother? Because cost doesn't seem to be an issue with the ecofriendly crowd that want alternative energy in use. If it costs 5 cents per kilowatt over 10 years or $5.00, it doesn't matter because they said it needs to happen and you will pay for it anyways if it is the only thing available.

And if there are people too cheap to pay the extra, then demonize them, complain and cause the cost of regular energy to increase to a point there is a trade off with regulations and such then get mad at the government for a failing economy when energy costs are sucking all the extra money out of it.
I strongly suspect this is less about "green" energy than it is generating energy in out-of-the-way places. The knee brace article mentions soldiers using it to charge/power their equipment in the field - where they'd typically be carrying around piles of batteries, or solar cells, or hauling around a generator. Being able to generate some electricity from simply walking sounds like a pretty nice trade-off. Similarly if you could make the soldier's uniforms out of this material, or make tents out of it, you could again reduce all the batteries and crap that they have to carry around.

Or you could use these technologies in camping/hiking gear. Charge up your phone/laptop/radio while simply walking through the countryside.

Or they could be used to create tech-friendly apparel. A jacket, perhaps, that keeps your iPod charged up at all times.

Or they could be used to supply power where the local infrastructure is damaged or outright missing. Throw up some tents/shelters made out of this cloth and generate electricity for lighting.

Or maybe something to throw into a survival kit. A little radio beacon sending out a constant SOS that's powered by your movement, or the clothes you wear.

I mean, there are literally tons of non-green reasons to look into technology like this. It may never be an economically viable way to generate large-scale electricity... You may never power your house with it... But there are also plenty of places/situations where economics are not the most important factor.

Re:Nano-generation Decision Point (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#22427940)

Well, I was dealing with the GP's comment

But it has to make economical sense. If you can coat your house in nano piezoelectric filaments that generate twice the current that they cost, then good. Otherwise, why bother?
When addressing the point of using it like that. I probably should have been more clear by quoting his words. You can make the case that using it for the reasons you mentions pretty good unless they cost 5 million a swipe and that it could only charge an Ipod nano in which case it would be more beneficial just using chemical batteries.

But as far as coating your house with these, it is just like the reasons people stack solar and other technologies that are only available to rich people who know employing them is an exercise in philanthropy. And of course I made the connection that some people don't care and want to force that onto people without regard to costs and then wonder what the hell happened to the econemy.

Re:Nano-generation Decision Point (2, Informative)

orclevegam (940336) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423722)

Knee braces and such, though, break that model, because you have to do more physical work to generate the power.
Another article talks more about the knee-brace. It actually helps you walk because it's got a clutch that only engages when your knee is flexing to absorb shock. It adds zero (more or less) resistance when lifting and adds resistance when bracing, so you end up recapturing a lot of the energy wasted on the down step. It's really the same principle as the active-braking systems in electric cars that allow them to recapture a lot of the energy used in accelerating the car when it's braking.

Re:Nano-generation Decision Point (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423734)

Self-winding watches are great, because you don't have to do any extra work to wind them; they wind themselves according to the work you already do raising and lowering your arm (weight of the watch notwithstanding).

As already pointed out, you do have to do extra work to wind them. (And elevating and lowering the weight of the watch does not wind it. Moving the balance wheel requires some extra energy input.)

Otherwise Nobel Prize anybody?

The point is, the energy needed to move the balance wheel is not very large.

obligatory (1)

Izabael_DaJinn (1231856) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423218)

"The ability to generate power for personal electronics using the clothing we wear would be a breakthrough in smart and interactive garments." -- Dianne Jones But will they run Linux?

Flicker Cladding! (1)

swm (171547) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423236)

Props to Rudy Rucker...

Grown on hair? (5, Funny)

LaRoach (968977) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423242)

They can be grown on any substrate, including hair

Then my back is gonna run the whole house!

Re:Grown on hair? (1)

sckeener (137243) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423510)

They can be grown on any substrate, including hair

Then my back is gonna run the whole house!


Nah...balding men are going to have artificial hair plugs that power their pace makers.

Re:Grown on hair? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423580)

Yea, I'm betting my ass alone could supply energy to one of the neighbors less fortunate then I am.

Powering medical devices? (2, Funny)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423250)

I can see it now:

"Grandpa, why won't you stop running?"

"Can't Junior. If I stop, my pacemaker will shut down. I shouldn't even stop to talk to y-... *urk*"

*thud*

Electric forest? (1)

romango (632756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423254)

Wonder if they could make synthetic trees out of this stuff and harvest wind power?

Re:Electric forest? (1)

oddaddresstrap (702574) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423452)

And if a tree fell in said forest and there was noone there to see it, would it still make sparks?

Re:Electric forest? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22426736)

Some blogger probably got a shot of it on his web cam. So ya.

Prior art (1)

Enlarged to Show Tex (911413) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423286)

What about the static electricity generated by wool, fleece, and other types of clothing? Shoot, in these parts just about anything can generate static, and there's no feeling quite as electric as getting bit by 20,000 volts on the end of your finger whenever you step out of the car...

Re:Prior art (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423606)

there's no feeling quite as electric as getting bit by 20,000 volts on the end of your finger whenever you step out of the car...
Yeah, it's amazing they don't shut down gas stations in winter what with the irrational fear of people using a cell phone there igniting gas fumes.

Re:Prior art (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424994)

They must not have watched [wikipedia.org] Mythbusters [wikipedia.org]

Re:Prior art (1)

Dmala (752610) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425280)

...and there's no feeling quite as electric as getting bit by 20,000 volts on the end of your finger whenever you step out of the car...

Actually, there is. Let's just say that you should make damn sure that you and your partner are both grounded before attempting to have sex on a dry, winter day.

Wheat.. (1)

bigattichouse (527527) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423288)

well.. a field of "wheat" gathering energy from the wind might be prettier than a windmill. until them aliens start making their crop circles.

Re:Wheat.. (1)

sjwaste (780063) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423798)

Windmills do not work that way! Goodnight.

How silly (3, Interesting)

hyc (241590) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423334)

They should just weave this stuff in with silk or wool and channel off the electricity from static buildup. Simple.

The Matrix (1)

mlwmohawk (801821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423378)

Years from now, when we are all feeding the huge network of computers that run our lives and the world with power generated by mere movement in the cloths we are forced to wear, we will remember that this news item did not alarm us at all.

Doh!

Re:The Matrix (2, Funny)

Surt (22457) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424728)

Years from now we aren't remembering it, because we think it wasn't thousands of years in the past, thanks to the matrix.

An interesting application (3, Funny)

Charcharodon (611187) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423412)

Make the bed sheets out of them....

"Damn it woman, leave me alone and go to sleep. Don't give me that "my iPod needs charging", I already checked it, it's full.

Re:An interesting application (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22423664)

"Damn it you horny bastard, I have a headache! Leave me alone and go to sleep. Don't give me that "my iPod needs charging", I already checked it, it's full.

There, fixed it for you.

Re:An interesting application (0, Troll)

Charcharodon (611187) | more than 6 years ago | (#22426308)

Haha, yeah I was thinking along those lines too when I was writing it.

Of course having a full charge on your cell phone when she calls you while you are "out with the boys" could get you in a lot of trouble.

" WTF?! Your cell phone battery isn't about to die, YOU'RE CHEATING ON ME! Don't try to tell me you put it on the car charger because took the cable out of your car when I got suspicious.

Nano-predictions? (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423428)

This new material will help make some shocking fashion statements, with the magnetic-like catwalk attracting Wired magazine to cover the gadget couture.

Sure to be a winner in Paris is the Jarvik pacemaker clothing line, followed with a grammy for the iJacket from Apple.

It's predicted that by the 2010 games, an additional $200 Billion will be spent on security scanners due to increased requirements from nano-clothing.

The **AA have jointly endorsed scanners at concerts and other creative media events to prevent clothing recorders from illegally observing the events.

In related news, Symantec has issued a code red bulletin for _myNAN-oh.A worm. This virus is spreading by contact with USB thumb drives and infected nano-clothing.

For more on this story and others, turn your tv-jacket inside out and press play, after this word from our sponsor: NanoSoft

Clothing Giveth... (0, Offtopic)

webword (82711) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423468)

Beat me again! (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423590)

I submitted this yesterday, it was probably already in the firehose. I saw it at New Scientist [newscientist.com] , where I followed some links to Professor Wang's press release [nsf.gov] .

Yes, that's really his name. Here [gatech.edu] is his research group's home page.

-mcgrew [slashdot.org]

Re:Beat me again! (1)

Electrawn (321224) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424450)

Not everyone emulates Butthead's laugh when hearing Wang in the computing world. Most slashdot folks should know about Wang Labs, until it was absorbed by Kodak in '97. The joke died in the '70s, man.

Re:Beat me again! (2, Funny)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424976)

The joke died in the '70s, man.

No it didn't, I've been keeping it on life support.

The place I worked at had a Wang minicomputer as late as 1995, and even bough Wang PCs. The secretaries all loved Wangs!

WOW!!! A great idea!! (2, Interesting)

mlwmohawk (801821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423718)

If the clothing can produce power, it must transfer energy. Movement must overcome the load. Energy is not free.

This is now the basis for programmable exercise clothing, electrically adjust how hard it is to walk or run to increase load. A small computer controlled load can be applied.

It's mine, and if any of you IP mofos steal it, I'll sue!!!

Re:WOW!!! A great idea!! (1)

spydabyte (1032538) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424050)

So now we have to worry about people hacking our clothing?

"Honest officer, the pimple-face kid in my neighbor's basement made me grab her ass"

Re:WOW!!! A great idea!! (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425366)

It was yours, until you made a public revelation. Now you're screwed unless you already filed the patent.

Re:WOW!!! A great idea!! (1)

mlwmohawk (801821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425454)

It was yours, until you made a public revelation. Now you're screwed unless you already filed the patent.

This post is prior art.

Re:WOW!!! A great idea!! (1)

untouchableForce (927584) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425954)

Not true actually. He has 1 year to file the patent from this date. At least that's how it's supposed to work. With the patent system the way it is today who the hell knows.

Like the Seinfeld one? (1)

Gman14msu (993012) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423748)

JERRY: George! Nice duds!

GEORGE: You're telling me. So, what do you think?

JERRY: Did you hear something?

ELAINE: Yeah, like a swoosh.

JERRY: Yeah.

ELAINE: It must be the fabric. It's rubbing between you thighs when you walk. That's what's making that swooshy sound.

GEORGE: I probably didn't hear it on the way over because of the street noise. This is no good! I got to meet these guys from MacKenzie for lunch in half an hour!

JERRY: So you think you're not gonna get the job because your pants make a noise?

GEORGE: Let's say it comes down to me and one other guy. He's got a nice quiet suit, and I'm whooshing all over the place! Who do you think he's gonna hire?

Needless to say no one at "Mackenzie" will be wearing this stuff.

Dancing all night! (1)

loftwyr (36717) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423766)

So if I mix this with the SurfaceSound Material [slashdot.org] then I could have clothes that generate power for my MP3 player and also plays the sound back.

Just think of the people dancing down the street blasting music and generating the power from their own dancing! Non-stop music!

Dangerous in so many ways! ... (1, Troll)

Elvish2012 (1239558) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423808)

What happens when you wrap a very low voltage electro-chemical system in a material that generates electricity (at likely a much higher voltage!)?? ... Cancer? ... significant health problems?? ... disruptions to brain activity???

Most of the scientific community seems to hold tightly to the notion that the human body is electrically neutral, ignoring that a human being is really an electro-chemical battery! Acupuncture deals with minute changes in the electrical potential of specific areas of the body, which are connected in "meridians" and correspond to all major organ systems. The electrical polarity varies in each part of the body, switching back and forth from slightly positive to slightly negative. These channels or meridians are DC analog. (citation: Robert O. Becker)

Moreover, all electrical fields produce magnetic fields. There are considerable studies which link low EMF (Electro-Magnetic Fields) with cancers and numerous health problems - even though these results have been suppressed and derided by the cell phone manufacturing companies. AC magnetic fields as low as 2.5 milligauss have been linked to childhood leukemia. Pulsed DC is even worse than AC. (citation: B. Blake Levitt)

Lastly there is the polarity issue of the magnetic fields that will be created. So called "South Pole" energy is dangerous and unpredictable - even as a Direct Current source. Energies from both poles are created. (citation: Albert Roy Davis Labs)

Re:Dangerous in so many ways! ... (1)

orclevegam (940336) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424110)

Wow, who let the crackpot in. Why don't you go enlighten one of those flat-earth guys. Better run, I think I hear some black helicopters headed this way.

Re:Dangerous in so many ways! ... (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424514)

I prefer to only belive the considerable studies that say there are links between disease and EMF and South Pole fields.

You ignore one side, I'll ignore the other. Then we can all get together and whine about global warming too!!!

Re:Dangerous in so many ways! ... (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425004)

Most of the scientific community seems to hold tightly to the notion that the human body is electrically neutral, ignoring that a human being is really an electro-chemical battery!

I know! That's why the machines want to use us as a power source!

Forget your silly EMF cancers, the real danger is that instead of plugging our bodies into their big generators while our brains are allowed to run free in a computer-generated utopia where we can all do super kung-fu, they'll keep us awake so we can run on treadmills generating power with our clothes!

I wanna be a battery, not a hamster!

Rain (2, Insightful)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423866)

What happens when it rains or snows?
What happens when you touch someone else who is "charged"?

Yes, but... (1)

wilder_card (774631) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423912)

Will it generate enough power to recharge the Tasers in my super-suit? Somehow I doubt it. Hard to fight crime when you're trailing an extension cord!

Alarm Sensors (5, Interesting)

sciop101 (583286) | more than 6 years ago | (#22423972)

This would make outstanding surface alarm matrix.

Woven into carpet, or embedded into a concrete/asphalt surface, with proper processing, this system could discriminate footsteps, vehicles, even seismic activity.

It's electric! (1)

San-LC (1104027) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424032)

What we need to do is distribute these to people attending weddings. Then, once they perform the "electric slide," they could harness enough power to replace all coal refining plants in the world! It's electric, boogie woogie woogie.

Prior Art... my wool sweater (1)

RexDevious (321791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424080)

Though I haven't been able really "power" anything with it yet, unless you count my finger tips which it transforms into magnetic media "encrypters".

As for the idea of putting in hair, my cat has prior art on that. But she's too lazy to even be a patent troll, so I wouldn't worry about it.

However this shakes out, lets just hope they avoid using the new fabrics in rain coats, swim wear, or lingerie. Hmm, or anything you'd eventually want to put in a washing machine.

clothing (1)

rpillala (583965) | more than 6 years ago | (#22424238)

I heard about this on NPR yesterday you can't wash the fabric yet because of the material's reaction with water. Get ready for funk.

Restless Leg Syndrome (1)

chazd (1037362) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425664)

Perhaps RLS is a throw-forward for mobile computing and that problematic power source? I know that I could have created a megawatt over my lifetime.

Conversion? (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425716)

can produce up to 80 milliwatts per square metre

Can I get that in Ergs / Library of Congresses or perhaps something related to an Automobile?

Laser weapons in the future... (1)

OshEcho (971542) | more than 6 years ago | (#22425726)

Imagine, war in the future...

Your fission generator just died and your batteries drain quickly. The enemies are closing in. Your laser rifle is useless now. You are ready to die. They caught up to you. Many bullets where fired at you. And then you say, "Hahahah, thanks for recharging my batteries. Now I can use my laser rifle. Die!!" :)

Throw in some EL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22426286)

Then you'll have a bitchin' Tron outfit!

How bout bra's? (2, Funny)

ShiNoKaze (1097629) | more than 6 years ago | (#22426412)

So a large breasted woman could power all kind of devices right? And the "power" captured would be taking stress away from the skin. So they would be less inclined to sag in the future right? You could prolly even tell who was natural and who wasn't by the power output, as the fake one's tend to be more.. solid. This should be done for the good of mankind!

nanopower - used to be flower power (1)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 6 years ago | (#22426888)

that paisley polyester under the home dyed wool vest could generate 10000 volts...
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