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POV-Ray Short Code Animation Winners

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the 512-bytes-is-plenty dept.

Graphics 80

Paul Bourke writes "Every year the POVRay rendering community run a short code competition. The challenge is create an image using a limited number of bytes, normally just 256. This year the competition required the artist to create an animation rather than just an image. The winning entries are now online where you can see what can be created for a meager 512 bytes."

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Already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22445888)

Already slashdotted.

Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (4, Insightful)

augustz (18082) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445902)

If you are going to link to what looks like a single machine that is supposed to serve up loads of videos, a mirror would be nice in the story submission :)

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22445952)

The winning entry (464 bytes):

#local C=clock*pi;#macro B(N,F)sphere{0F/7 1scale 1-pow(I.5)translate-I*F*x rotate y*N*90rotate-N*x*pow(5I)*10*sin(I*2-C*8+i)scale.2+x*.8translate-x}#end#local i=C;#while(itranslate*2rotate x*37pigment{slope y}}#local i=i+pi/8;#end light_source{1spotlight}media{intervals 6scattering{2rgb/99}}

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (5, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445992)

Robot filter
Sorry, some robots are filtered from this site.
You are using Wget/1.10.2
This filtering is not intended to restrict your enjoyment of this site. There is a very large amount of data contained
within and robots who attempt to copy the whole site adversely affect our bandwidth and wallet.

Anyway, here's the winning result:
#local C=clock*pi;#macro B(N,F)sphere{0F/7 1scale 1-pow(I.5)translate-I*F*x rotate y*N*90rotate-N*x*pow(5I)*10*sin(I*2-C*8+i)scale.2+x*.8translate-x}#end#local i=C;#while(itranslate*2rotate x*37pigment{slope y}}#local i=i+pi/8;#end light_source{1spotlight}media{intervals 6scattering{2rgb/99}}
(by Jeff Reifel)

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446310)

Back in the days people looked at timestamps and moderated the first guy up, and the second guy "redundant". What happened to Slashdot? Gotta penalize those who repeat a comment, whether it's plagiarism or not bothering to read the thread.

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (5, Informative)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446368)

I'm going to forgo posting with mod points and actually post a meassge, the reason the first poster did not get modded up was because he posted AC and only posted the solution, whereas xaxa posted the solution, the author and the reason why mirroring the website wouldn't work.

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446544)

Using CoralCDN

Taking advantage of CoralCDN is simple. Just append .nyud.net to the hostname of any URL, and your request for that URL is handled by CoralCDN!

I'm going to forgo posting with mod points and actually post a meassge, the reason the first poster did not get modded up was because he posted AC and only posted the solution, whereas xaxa posted the solution, the author and the reason why mirroring the website wouldn't work.
(by MadnessASAP)

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22447566)

Ah, the irony...

(for idiot mods, I am not the same AC)

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (1)

FeepingCreature (1132265) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447342)

wget http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/exhibition/scc5/final.html [uwa.edu.au] -O- -q -U Mozilla |grep \\.mov |sed -e "s@.*href=.@@" -e "s@mov.*@mov@" |while read e; do echo http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/exhibition/scc5/$e [uwa.edu.au] ; done |xargs wget -U Mozilla --referer="http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/exhibition/scc5/final.html" :) --feep

Windows pov ray 3.6 (1)

aepervius (535155) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447610)

It does not compile. I added a ) after the while(i. It did not compile at the scattering command either. Suppressed rgb. Got a black screen. So... Are those 256/512 byte file somewhere available to download ? Not that I doubt that one could do nifty things in a compact unreadable code (after all I did similar stuff, although not as cool, in assembly and MCGA a long time ago). But I would still like to see it done on my PC , maybe to learn something who knows.

Re:Slashdot + Many Videos = Where is the mirror (5, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446036)

Forget my previous post, the NYUD.net [nyud.net] mirror is working well.

Slashdotted... (0, Redundant)

madcow_bg (969477) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445906)

The poor guys :(.

Re:Slashdotted... (1)

Large Green Mallard (31462) | more than 6 years ago | (#22456686)

You don't know the half of it, they're paying AU$38/gb for inbound traffic :)

Animated GIFs? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22445916)

And of course, it didn't occur to anyone to provide previews in the form of animated GIFs (or MNGs, although thanks to the Mozilla guys' continuing idiocy, hardly anyone would actually be able to view those).

I wonder (4, Interesting)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445918)

Seeing these submissions for their artistic value, and knowing they were produced entirely from code, I wonder if there is any correlation between artistry and programming.
I know that programming is very creative in the first place, but some of these submissions go beyond, especially when you take into account they are less than a k.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446074)

Ever heard of demos, intros etc? :-\

Re:I wonder (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446270)

http://scene.org/ [scene.org]

Re:I wonder (2, Interesting)

Nazlfrag (1035012) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448556)

I'd like to throw in www.256b.com [256b.com] to the mix.

Re:I wonder (2, Interesting)

dousette (562546) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446592)

So how on earth does one come up with the trig functions necessary to do these transformations by hand without a modeller? Look at the complexity of the winner [uwa.edu.au] .

I am not artistic by any stretch of the imagination, but I do enjoy math and programming and downloaded POV-Ray and the related documentation hoping to learn more about art through programming. So far, I made a sphere on a checkered floor, and POV-Ray handled all of the trig for me there.

Any tutorials out there on mathematic transformations and how they apply to a 3d rendering?

Re:I wonder (1)

kramulous (977841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22451788)

The site where the results of this competition are held is an excellent place to start. Paul Bourke, who also posted the article, creates a lot of this stuff. I *strongly* suggest you spend some time on that site. To start with, try: http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/surfaces_curves/ [uwa.edu.au]

Re:I wonder (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446688)

Interesting? Perhaps, insightful, not at all.

Art is programming, isn't it? A canvas(). paints[]. brush.setColor(...) - brush.stroke(canvas). A painting is a process, derived from inputs, filters, intelligence and our own inputs and memory.

What I cannot understand is how little of 'creativity' humanity understands. What inpresses me about these images is how close to the entropy of the image the code reflects.

You can make a very detailed, colorful image in a few bytes, but it will be a fractal, mandlebrot or some itterative process. Looking at the work created in context free , you also get a feeling that you are describing the imagery.

You can say:

Apple.

Or you can describe it in a thousand words, or show a picture. These are encodings of the final image, a way of compressing the output into a common language that can represent it again.

Certainly, if POV has an apple, or rosy-apple command, you could make a very lifelike apple in one command, but the language would be universal (and you would have to then vary it to be more specific).

The fact that visual imagery is being transmitted in this way reflects what I wrote about in my thesis (waaay back) - how we can describe a more common language to computers, to allow for higher compression.

I studied fractal compression, and various compression techniques (wavelet, various block based transforms, all frequency based) and tried to look at image analysis, an interesting but oft discarded element of image processing. Rather than say 'sky... trees... house' the processing could at least abstract gradients and noise patterns and apply them via a BSP style tree structure to the image, a little like feature labelling algorithms.

The idea being you can succinctly describe enough properties of the image, that the 'error' you can to then encode has sufficiently small entropy so that it was a big win in compression.

So, I love these images for really riding the entropy line, and creating works in an almost 1:1 language (it *is* a 1:1 language, but I mean, with flexibility and dexterity)

Re:I wonder (1)

FLEB (312391) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448902)

Would this be something similar to vector-autotracing, perhaps with the ability to recognize a set of graphic elements-- noise, gradients, repeating patterns. It's not so much "apple", "tree", as curve and point information, (as that's more what computers would "know"), but it's still abstracting raster data into a description with fewer described attributes (essentially, an abstraction).

As for your question, I think the creative element is still well in play, it's just not in an existing conventional expression. The vision is still there, it's just the craft and expression that changes. Instead of being expressed by a pen against paper, the vision of the artist is expressed by explicit instructions to a computer. Perhaps it's less "right brain" than other creative arts, but that aspect is often more about the ability to reproduce forms than creativity-- the ability to generate ideas.

Re:I wonder (4, Interesting)

Grard Menfin (1178135) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447248)

It's been traditional for POV-Ray users to create images entirely by code. That was the case for instance of this image [povcomp.com] that won the POVCOMP competition in 2004: most objects, including very complex ones, were made using isosurfaces, that are basically function-based objects. Scenes like this one [oyonale.com] and this one [oyonale.com] were also written in POV-Ray code, and the source is available.

bad summary? (2, Insightful)

friedman101 (618627) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445920)

Seems to me like the challenge is to create a script for "POV-ray" that is less than 512 bytes to create a cool animation. Title lead me to believe that some of those animations were under 512 bytes which would have been totally amazing.

Re:bad summary? (2, Informative)

TheSunborn (68004) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445934)

If you think of powray as an animation player, and have a REALLY fast computer, then the animation is only 512 bytes :}

Re:bad summary? (1)

ThinkingInBinary (899485) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445938)

Er, it mentioned it was a "short code competition". How would that lead you to believe the output was short?

Re:bad summary? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446098)

i had figured it was a 512 byte asm pov renderer- but that didn't quite make sense either.

Re:bad summary? (1)

caffeinemessiah (918089) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448408)

Title lead me to believe that some of those animations were under 512 bytes which would have been totally amazing.

How about some neat animations as 256-byte executables -- 256b.com [256b.com] .

I think... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22445926)

...the second animation pretty much shows what happened to their server.

512B pov-ray? Screw that! (5, Insightful)

Xtense (1075847) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445928)

POV-Ray? Screw that, see what can be made in a 256B EXECUTABLE. Just to give some popular examples, tube/3SC [pouet.net] , PHOBIA/ind [pouet.net] . Yup, the demoscene was there a long time before, and still it churns out some beautiful code that boggles the mind. Nothing impressive to see here though, just a fat-ass raytracer with a small input file.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

Xtense (1075847) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445958)

Oh, wait, copy-paste screwup.

tube/3SC [pouet.net]

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

neumayr (819083) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446012)

While those demos might be more impressive from a technical standpoint, the Povray animations look a lot better.

Anyways, it's not a competition between demos and animation, those two can't compare. Totally different things.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (4, Informative)

Xtense (1075847) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446092)

True that, but every time i see some size-coding competitions, I can't help but feel like they are some form of geeks' penis-measurement competitions. Thus, to satisfy my inner asshole, i like to point them to those demoscene productions, which, to the best of my knowledge, are indeed one of the smallest coded animations in the world. And the 256B limit is just traditional, there are animated moire patterns in 15B down there and four-kilobyte demos utilizing OpenGL and DirectX. Some of the OpenGL ones are for linux, too, with source.

Oh, and these renders might be prettier, but these are still just input files for a huge raytracer, so IMO, there's nothing really to cheer about. Make a 'tracer in 512 bytes, then I'll be impressed :) .

And yes, this post is really inflammatory, get off my lawn, you insensitive clod, etc. etc.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (4, Insightful)

neumayr (819083) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446242)

Heh, yeah, let's keep the fire going:
Utilizing OpenGL/DirectX you say? So, the code's 15 or whatever bytes long, but dynamically linked to a huge library. That's not so far removed from interfacing with a raytracer, at least it's a lot closer to it than the demos you originally posted.

I personally never did anything for Povray - honestly I didn't know it could do animation before this story. But given the range of quality of the animations in this contest, getting anything done in a 512 bytes Povray files seems to be a noteworthy achievement.
So, let them cheer :)

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (5, Informative)

Xtense (1075847) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446418)

Oh no, the 15B moire pattern is pure assembler, no libs attached. I had a link somewhere, let me find it in a moment (crap internet connections suck!). You could say that it's cheating, using the MCGA 13h 320x200 256color mode (or for the pros out there - raping text mode's charset to produce something weird), but that's one step from declaring that the true form of demomaking is building your own hardware and coding effects for it with your own assembly. Which in itself would be immensely cool, but a bit overkill. As for the OpenGL/DirectX 4K stuff, it's just moving on with the times - every normally used computer out there has at least DirectX 8 and OpenGL 1.1 with compatible hardware on it, so it would be a shame not to use natural-environment libraries.

Couldn't find the 15B one, so here's a one-byte bigger thing: fr-016: bytes/Farbrausch [pouet.net] .

I remember doing school stuff in POV-Ray, simple things like cubes, spheres, intersecting cones and whatnot for my math geometry/stereometry classes. While not having heaps of experience like these guys, i think i can safely assume that, while requiring creativity and effort, these aren't truly that hard to make, since this is mostly 3d math, fractals and quadrics sprinkled a bit with randomness on the top. But i guess i just get my boner from creative software hacks (which, in turn, are too 3d/2d math, just hacked up beyond all recognition), not scripts. Oh well, different fetishes ;) .

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 6 years ago | (#22455402)

It's atually 15B but COMPILED. Try this with uncompiled code. Povray doesn't have compiled code, only source, so 512B IS admirable, when some of your instructions have 15B in length.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | more than 6 years ago | (#22458648)

It may be 15 bytes, but they're cheating because they are using CISC processors. Try using a RISC for real demo studliness. :-/

Eventually, you get to the point where it is silly. Setting a particular limit forces people to be creative and efficient, something that most software companies forgot decades ago.

Whether it's 512B animations in POV, 256B images, 4K demos using OpenGL, 4k assembly hacks, or whatever, they are all exercises in creativity and cleverness, and just really cool nerd-fu.

By the way, POV-Ray totally rocks. Some of those animations are amazing... coming from source code you could write on a Post-It note. I've been using it since 0.5, and it's an incredibly fun tool that can do some amazing things.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 6 years ago | (#22462644)

It may be 15 bytes, but they're cheating because they are using CISC processors. Try using a RISC for real demo studliness. :-/
You're right. It looks like for every purity lover, it is possible to find another, who is even more of a code puritan.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447064)

Oh, and these renders might be prettier, but these are still just input files for a huge raytracer, so IMO, there's nothing really to cheer about. Make a 'tracer in 512 bytes, then I'll be impressed :) .

Does that really matter?

A lot of demos use software interrupts. Should those be considered invalid too?

It helps to think of the tracer as a platform-independent machine, and we're writing code for that machine.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446062)

512 bytes ought to be enough for everyone!

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (5, Funny)

Cctoide (923843) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446176)

No, mine's smaller!

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (2, Interesting)

Trogre (513942) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447024)

Look I'm as keen on the oldskool demoscene as the next guy. I've seen pretty much every noteworthy 256b, 512b, 4k etc demo there is. But you know what? In this age of multi-tasking pre-emptive multitasking operating systems, I miss that scene. I really do. That drive to create, given a constrained framework, something unexpected and impressive. And these POV demos bring back that same feeling (probably nostalgia) for me. More than that though, they seem like a logical evolutionary step in that scene. So the framework used to be an i386 or an Amiga. Today it's POV-Ray. So what if this platform is a fat-ass raytracer? Are Amiga demos unimpressive because they're linking to big gfx/sound libraries implemented in hardware?

Let the demos roll, I say.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22447348)

Are Amiga demos unimpressive because they're linking to big gfx/sound libraries implemented in hardware?
Yes.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

doti (966971) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447626)

Nothing impressive to see here though, just a fat-ass raytracer with a small input file.
These are pre-rendered animation.

POV-Ray is not intended to render in real time, and there's no such thing as a fast-ass ray-tracer yet.

Re:512B pov-ray? Screw that! (1)

xouumalperxe (815707) | more than 6 years ago | (#22463766)

there's no such thing as a fast-ass ray-tracer yet.

No, but there are several fat-ass raytracers about.

And somewhere in Australia... (0, Redundant)

sugarman (33437) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445946)

a server does an amazing impression of the second-place winner. [uwa.edu.au]

Re:And somewhere in Australia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22445964)

I don't think you thought your cunning plan all the way through.

Re:And somewhere in Australia... (1)

kramulous (977841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22449444)

I don't think you thought your cunning plan all the way through.
Thanks for that. Got a good giggle out of it.

Mirror (1, Informative)

jrwr00 (1035020) | more than 6 years ago | (#22445974)

http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au.nyud.net/~pbourke/exhibition/scc5/final.html [nyud.net]

Note to Editors, Next time you see a site that is on a 486 hosted on ISDN

Please at lest link to some kind of mirror

Re:Mirror (1)

macs4all (973270) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446038)

...and next time you put up a mirror, make sure that someone can actually ACCESS it.

Sheesh, the quality of /. subscribers is really going downhill...

Re:Mirror (1)

jrwr00 (1035020) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448708)

Don't blame me, Blame Coral Content Distribution Network

Videos of first 4 prizes (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446240)

Re:Videos of first 4 prizes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22446302)

It is somehow not being listed. Check the profile.

Maybe 512 bytes was too high of a limit... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446138)

Considering the slashdot effect of people trying to view just these tiny files was enough to bring a server at an Australian University to its knees...

Latest FLOSS weekly about POV Ray (4, Informative)

Zarniwoot (979457) | more than 6 years ago | (#22446164)

Incidentally, the most recent FLOSS Weekly podcast (with Randal PERL Schwartz) is about POV-Ray. As usual interesting:
http://www.twit.tv/floss24 [www.twit.tv]

Re:Latest FLOSS weekly about POV Ray (3, Insightful)

pthisis (27352) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447008)

Incidentally, the most recent FLOSS Weekly podcast (with Randal PERL Schwartz) is about POV-Ray. As usual interesting:
http://www.twit.tv/floss24 [www.twit.tv]


That's pretty odd considering that the POV-Ray license, while quite liberal, is not open-source. The podcast erroneously lists it as such, and the podcast doesn't correct that (at least in the first few minutes). The POV-Ray license in particular prohibits much commercial distribution (in violation of OSD/DFSG term 6) and allows a revocation list of people/distributions who are not allowed to distribute at all (in violation of OSD/DFSG term 5).

I don't want to give the impression that the POV-Ray team is against open-source/free software. There is a lot of thought towards a GPL'd rewrite by the POV-Ray team, and the main reason it's not open-source is that the license predates any real definition of open-source or free software in the modern sense and there are too many contributors to relicense easily.

I just want to point out that the POV-Ray license is not currently open-source, that's a known issue that the developers are trying to address, and it's odd for a podcast dedicated to FLOSS not to mention that up front (and indeed to erroneously list it as open-source on the intro page).

Re:Latest FLOSS weekly about POV Ray (1)

Zarniwoot (979457) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448068)

They discuss this in the podcast. And they discuss the current transition to GPL. It makes perfect sense to have this in FLOSS weekly! These people part of the open source community and deserve to be recognized for there work, despite any historic legal leftovers..

Re:Latest FLOSS weekly about POV Ray (1)

pthisis (27352) | more than 6 years ago | (#22453860)

Awesome, I listened to about the first 10 minutes (give or take) and didn't hear any mention of it. Yes they absolutely deserve to be recognized for their work, I've been using POV-ray since 1993 and it's tremendous. I was just surprised that the license status wasn't prominently mentioned and that they repeatedly referred to it as open-source, when it's a significant topic of discussion on the POV-Ray mailing lists.

video compression standard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22447042)

Seems like this POVRAY thingie could be a decent video CODEC, much smaller downloads than H264 at far better quality.
Several nature documentaries may fit on a single-sided floppy disk.

Didn't find the compressor to try though, only the decompresser???? .j

Re:video compression standard? (1)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447764)

i'm not sure you understand the concept

Re:video compression standard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22448650)

WOOOOOOOOSHHHHH!!!!!

Re:video compression standard? (1)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448818)

lol okay im glad that was a joke :)

Where's the code? (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447080)

Maybe I'm missing something obvious, but I can't find the source for the animations...

Re:Where's the code? (1)

l_bratch (865693) | more than 6 years ago | (#22447120)

My thoughts exactly - it even says "the source code provided".

Re:Where's the code? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22447234)

It's right there - look for "Short version" just under the image. "Long version" is with comments and formatted to be readable.

Need the ini.txt file, too (2, Informative)

ODBOL (197239) | more than 6 years ago | (#22450326)

Well, I was troubled when I ran povray on the winning program, and got only a still picture. After some muddling around, I noticed that the contest rules specified an "ini.txt" file, to wit:

Output_File_Type=N
Width=400
Height=300
Quality=9
Antialias=on
Antialias_Threshold=0.01
Initial_Frame = 0
Final_Frame = 99
Initial_Clock = 0
Final_Clock = 1

Now I'm Sad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22447636)

It's like watching porn for a geek.

I mean, I've played around with POV-Ray before, and know the mechanics of how it is supposed to work, but watching the professionals at work and comparing it to my own past performances - it makes me feel ...

... inadequate.

Well thats one figure of speech down the drain. (1)

mach1980 (1114097) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448106)

Well, here's definite truth that a picture does not tell a thousand words but less than 512 bytes.

So much for poetry!

POV ray (1)

jagdish (981925) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448194)

When fired, the Point-of-view ray causes the target to experience the point of view of the wielder.

Re:POV ray (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 6 years ago | (#22454832)

Warning: firing the Point-of-View ray at a mirror at yourself might cause recursion problems..

Just like to say (1)

C_Kode (102755) | more than 6 years ago | (#22448876)

Gorgeous, in every sense of the accomplishment in making these animations.

Tips hat.

Archive of old contest results? (1)

ODBOL (197239) | more than 6 years ago | (#22449914)

I love this stuff, and want to look at all of it. I found SCC3 at http://ozviz.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/exhibition/scc3/final/ [uwa.edu.au]
but I can't find contests number 1, 2, nor 4. I tried the Wayback machine, with no luck. Maybe I didn't search right. Anybody know where to find 'em?

Found SCC4 (1)

ODBOL (197239) | more than 6 years ago | (#22450270)

http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/exhibition/scc4/final/ [uwa.edu.au]

But still can't find 1 & 2.

Re:Found SCC4 (1)

kramulous (977841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22451918)

Another: http://ozviz.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/exhibition/povfrac/final/ [uwa.edu.au]
Not sure which year and can't find any others.

Re:Found SCC4 (1)

penguin king (673171) | more than 6 years ago | (#22451948)

OT re: sig linux user, used space in username purely because it was a novelty.

April 2004 --- what number? (1)

ODBOL (197239) | more than 6 years ago | (#22453608)

Thanks very much. The "fractal" round that you found is different from the 3, 4, and 5 that I had already, so I grabbed it eagerly.

The contest explanation says that it concluded in April 2004. They don't seem to be going on any clear annual schedule. Since round 3 was at the end of 2004, I think this is probably SCC2.

Re:April 2004 --- what number? (1)

kramulous (977841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22472792)

I'm sure if you emailed Paul, he'd let you know what happened to the previous contests (probably hiding under the data mat at Swinburne. He'd a very down to earth guy and would help you out if possible. His email address is at the top of his home page: http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/index.html [uwa.edu.au]

Quicktime, oh god why!? (1)

enoz (1181117) | more than 6 years ago | (#22453100)

Am I not the only one to think Quicktime was not exactly the most intelligent choice for a "a movie format that will supported by all hardware and OS combinations"?

The videos I tried crashed Media Player Classic using Quicktime Alternative codecs. But I guess I only have myself to blame for not installing that highly functional brushed silver "Quicktime Player".
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