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181 comments

Scott Draker interview about CmdrTaco's faggotry.. (-1, Troll)

News For Turds (580751) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504416)

Perhaps the crime most feared and most under reported is that of male on male rape, says Rob Malda in his new book Male on Male Rape: The CmdrTaco syndrome.

Like most efforts in the incipient victim's rights movement, the book and CmdrTaco's own career as coordinator of Slashdot's Rape Education and Prevention Program got their genesis in someone's own victimization and transformation as a male rape survivor. For CmdrTaco, the events leading up to and surrounding his and many other male rapes are rooted in homosexuality--the sexuality of choice for Slashdot authors.

It started for CmdrTaco in the fall of 1989 when he and his friend
Hemos began their sophomore year at the Slashdot school for the
sexually impaired, sharing a dormitory room at Bradly Hall and
serving as President and Vice President of the Gay and Lesbian
Alliance.

As campus gay leaders they raised questions and initiated dialogue
on issues about which many men on the campus felt uncomfortable,
including all the men on the third floor of Bradly Hall.
As a result, they received anal penetrations, reach arounds,
offers to write for Slashdot, and a daily dirty sanchez from the
other men on their floor. To escape the hostility, Hemos
headed home for the weekend and CmdrTaco visited a gay bar.
CmdrTaco meets a man there who hours later would in CmdrTaco's
dormitory room would rape him. He describes dramatically how he
could not call for help because he loved it too much.

"A culture that encourages and condones sexual violence wielded as
a tool for the control and subordination of those with less power
in our society." Basically, CmdrTaco states that he, and other
flaming homosexuals use male rape as the leverage to gain control of
Slashdot's readers. Slashdot has always been pro-gay, but CmdrTaco
has turned the once "queers are people to" website into a man-sauce
guzzling festival of uninvited anal penetration and reach arounds.

What we actually know about male rape is very little. It is, as
JonKatz describes it, "something like a stack of delicious,
shit crusted pancakes that I can't wait to stick my tongue into!"

His is not the first book on the subject however. Cowboy Neal,
also of Slashdot fame wrote the first book in 1990, Male Rape:
Breaking the Silence on my Favorite Pastime.

CmdrTaco though traverses the 20 studies that have been conducted
in the past 30 years. These are the only studies that have
examined the issue in a non-institutionalized setting, such as
Slashdot. Here is what we do know, from the shards of information
CmdrTaco expertly and exclusively narrates.

* Male rapes constitute about five to 10 percent of all rapes.

* Male rapes account for 100% of all rapes in the Slashdot community.

* Most perpetrators self-identify as "uber geeks".

* Most offenders refer to themselves as a "CmdrTaco."

* Most offenders are Slashdot readers.

* Most offenders rape out of lust or passion or sexual desire.

* Most victims state that they are only trying to "root" a victim's "box."

* When documented at all, Slashdot authors had no preference to heterosexual or homosexual victims.

* Slashdot authors referred to these pack or gang rapings as "lan parties.".

* Stigma and shame are common responses from male rape victims.

* This is followed by the victim's interest in the Linux operating system.

* Contemplation of suicide is fairly common among male rape survivors.

* The most common form of post-male raping suicide attempts is forcing a huge member into the already violated "purple carnation" (Slashdot lingo for a penetrated anus).

Here [goatse.cx] is an example of some of CmdrTaco's brilliant research.

Re:Scott Draker interview about CmdrTaco's faggotr (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506024)

"Most victims state that they are only trying to "root" a victim's "box."
A true lol moment :D

Rural area (4, Interesting)

esocid (946821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504486)

Space Data's business model is to provide low cost platforms for rural and remote data and voice communication applications via its high altitude SkySite network, which basically consists of an array of balloons equipped with a box of transceivers and other gadgets.
This does seem pretty cool, except since they probably have a short lifespan, as well as being manipulated by weather and wind, that these won't be extremely reliable. It's well intentioned but I am just not sure how this will get off the ground (no pun intended).

Balloon-borne transceivers are launched every 8 to 12 hours and last for about 24 hours before bursting and floating gently back down to earth. Each box of tricks carries a $100 reward for whoever finds it and returns it safely.
So they are sending out a constant stream of weather balloons that may or may not cause concerns with air traffic (I'm not sure how high these go) that will end up just sitting in remote areas when they crash. It kind of seems like a pipe dream to me.

Re:Rural area (4, Interesting)

apdyck (1010443) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504598)

I can't help but wonder about the costs. If they are paying $100 per baloon found, that's a huge chunk of change - for every baloon, 36,500/year (100/day, 24 hour float time). I would think that having tethered baloons would be a better idea, as they would not have to try to find them. Of course, you're still looking at occupying air space, and real estate on top of it if you secure them. Perhaps a better model would be to pay individuals $100/month to have a baloon tied out in their back yard, or some such.

Re:Rural area (4, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505008)

Yea, it seems like it should be a lot easier to get more endurance out of these things than they're getting...The balloon idea is mainly interesting as a jump off for some basically autonomous station keeping signal platforms...A small blimp covered with solar cells or powered by a large betavoltaic [wikipedia.org] battery or something...

As long as they're just spamming platforms that last for a day or two, the idea is pretty much doomed. The loss rate is going to be astronomical, and sending guys out in a truck to pick 'em up is in no way cost efficient.

Re:Rural area (2, Insightful)

Thansal (999464) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505028)

wait, I got it!

Why don't we set up these polls that will have the hardware on top!

We just need to space them out nice and evenly, and we wouldn't have to worry (as much) about weather effects. Heck, why limit our selves to just just traditional internet access. I bet I could rig up some sort of portable radio that could make use of these polls.

I could call them PollRadios!

Yah! I am going to make MILLIONS!

So, seriously, what is the point of these balloons? I mean, I could see usages for it where you need to saturate an area with radio for a temporary time (for an always on type thing this just sounds way to cost prohibitive). Something like when if you have a manhunt (lost person/criminal/I don't care) going on in a wilderness area you could set up some sort of network with these things so that searchers could be in constant contact, and such.

Re:Rural area (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22505146)

I would have modded you up, but you misspelled pole.

Re:Rural area (1)

tinkerghost (944862) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505708)

Why don't we set up these polls that will have the hardware on top!
We just need to space them out nice and evenly, and we wouldn't have to worry (as much) about weather effects. Heck, why limit our selves to just just traditional internet access. I bet I could rig up some sort of portable radio that could make use of these polls.

Yep indeedee, that would be a Paula Bean Brillant idea, why it wouldn't take more than a pole every 20 miles in wide open spaces to handle that - how many square miles is Texas?. Every mile in rough terrain if you don't mind dead spots in the low points.

Or you can pop a balloon up into the atmosphere, get better coverage over a larger area and not pay rent. The balloons are cheap, the hardware is expensive. If you can replace the equipment on 4 towers with 1 piece that's twice as expensive, you still have a lot of cash on hand to buy & maintain balloons. There are companies that already do this with blimps for special events that lack adequate coverage, so I can certainly see the potential to be cost effective.

Terrible idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22506328)

These polls don't have a Cowboy Neal option.

Re:Rural area (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505488)

better still, they charge you 100$ a month, and install a tethered balloon in your backyard to relay internet service to you. Then, they add receivers for your neighbor, and you get a price reduction for each customer that comes on via your balloon. with a minimum of 20$ a month. so, if you and 4 of your neighbors get on the service, you got a 20$ balloon in your back yard, and internet. THEN the company would make money, and not be a pipe dream.

Re:Rural area (1)

Yez70 (924200) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506342)

So what happens when a local crop duster or life flight helicopter flies through this tethered balloon? It's definitely not a batter model.

Re:Rural area (1)

Rampantbaboon (946107) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505260)

I think it would be a fun thing to do for whenever I go back home to visit my folks. Get the boots on and go baloon hunting, it's more profitable than coyote pelts.

Re:Rural area (1)

anexkahn (935249) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505448)

This thing would be perfect for emergency situations....for example:

During the fires last year in San Diego the emergency personnel used cell phones, but had trouble getting reception. These balloons could help with that issue.

The main problem about that situation was the Wind. You would have to tether the balloon to keep it in the area where you need it to be.

The Internet as a Mesh Network (4, Interesting)

DigitalisAkujin (846133) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504488)

The beginning of the end for ISPs.

The internet will eventually become a self propagating mesh network. (Case and point: One laptop per child)

Re:The Internet as a Mesh Network (1)

emilper (826945) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505626)

great ... I want to download the Debian CDs, can I route the traffic through your laptop, please ? :-P

Re:The Internet as a Mesh Network (1)

swimin (828756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505714)

It's case in point.

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-cas1.htm [worldwidewords.org]

Re:The Internet as a Mesh Network (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506356)

I wonted to point that out two. It's so dafty cult trying to police every in-edu catered person on the internets throw. While I'd lie cthu pick every one of their dirty malaproprism-ing asses into bolivian, I'm war heed that one of them mite act tooly be burger then me and I'll get my ass picked in-spread. Be carefool, it's a doggy-dog world out there pee-poll.

The begining of the end of nice ping rates (4, Insightful)

headbulb (534102) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505760)

Mesh networks are interesting, but a wireless one that would be required would have way too many hops. Then the congestion on each hop would be high too.

Ping rates would go down the tubes.

Dear Google (5, Funny)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504498)

I have a BB Gun.

Re:Dear Google (1)

corychristison (951993) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504562)

Dunno if that would wreak as much havoc as a missile launcher would.

;-)

Re:Dear Google (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504712)

As the Military "proved" that they can hit a fuel tank that's in space.

Sorta like shooting swamp rats back on Dagoba, yeah?

Re:Dear Google (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504916)

Sorta like shooting swamp rats back on Dagoba, yeah?

I was going to correct you but realized that being a pedantic Star Wars nerd is more embarrassing than being an inaccurate one.

Re:Dear Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22505092)

Wow, it's like everything I know and love about Slashdot was just blown to pieces by an intrepid adventurer firing through an impossible to hit vent leading to the core of the...

Yeah.

Re:Dear Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22505370)

How pedantic is it to use the word pedantic?

Re:Dear Google (1)

kat_skan (5219) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504714)

Holy crap! What kind of BB gun do you have that you aren't sure whether a BB gun would wreak as much havoc as a missile launcher?

Re:Dear Google (3, Funny)

trollboy (46578) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504986)

This has been done before. When there wasn't enough coverage you got a verbal warning msg.
"Spawn more overlords"

Why? (4, Interesting)

ShadowsHawk (916454) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504502)

I love Google as much as the next slashdotter, but I have to wonder where they're going with this. Android, the dark fiber, Wifi balloons, etc. It doesn't really tie into advertising.

Re:Why? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504608)

i have to admit it seems like the idea of a stoner... "dude... we're going to send people wireless internet from a balloon... "

Re:Why? (3, Insightful)

the4thdimension (1151939) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504622)

Possibly just a publicity stunt? We know that google shot themselves into the limelight and now they must try to stay there. Creative ideas to bring internet access to rural areas keep your good name alive among many. I believe they are attempting to continue to be seen as the "good" company where as many tech-oriented folks look at Microsoft as the "bad" company. Image is everything and I think they are trying to keep it together. However, I agree that this seems to be a bit out there.

It's a Niche Business Model (2, Interesting)

StaticEngine (135635) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504704)

When people's Android cellphones are reporting their every move via a network of wi-fi weather baloons, Google will have totally cornered the market of Paranoid Schitzophrenic consumers.

Re:It's a Niche Business Model (2, Funny)

rootofevil (188401) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504836)

cornering paranoid schizophrenics?

that doesnt sound like a good idea to me.

at least not if you want to live.

Re:Why? (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505136)

The connection is obvious - people can't see Google's ads if they can't get to Google. Whether this is all worth it is something we will all shortly see.

Re:Why? (2, Interesting)

peacefinder (469349) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505696)

Google bidding in the FCC bandwidth auction in progress + balloon-based cell transceivers + dark fiber = cheap new national cell network for Android.

Of course, there remain one or two technical obstacles...

Re:Why? (1)

recharged95 (782975) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506360)

But it does tie into a bunch of nerdy, rich, smart guys, looking to make money and to "be cool" in solving world problems.

According to Hollywood recent flicks, that's like being sort of a hero.

Google's day of reckoning coming soon (2, Interesting)

peter303 (12292) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504506)

The stock market has stopped believing Google's undisciplined business model will be that profitable and driven the stock price down considerably.

Be sure not to paint 'em red (4, Funny)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504510)

We all know what happens when 99 red balloons are floating in the summer sky.

If they're carrying data, well, so much the worse...

Whatever colour, we're screwed (3, Informative)

TheEmptySet (1060334) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505668)

The colour of the balloons is just an artefact of the translation from the song's original German where they were just "99 Luftballons" (actually the German lyrics tell a much better story as the translation changes a lot). So the world is over whatever colour they make them.

Only a 24-hour lifespan? (4, Insightful)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504526)

From the article:

Balloon-borne transceivers are launched every 8 to 12 hours and last for about 24 hours before bursting and floating gently back down to earth. Each box of tricks carries a $100 reward for whoever finds it and returns it safely.

That's an awful waste of resources not to mention what happens if someone is transmitting a signal when the balloon in your area pops? How much does all this constant launching and recovering cost compared to just putting in a tower despite the remoteness?

I can see using these balloons for limited times, such as emergencies, or battlefield conditions where there are no cell towers (as the article intimates) but for every day use? I don't think so.

And what is this 'floating gently back down to earth' stuff? Unless they have a parachute, the tranceiver will not be floating gently back down to earth when the balloon pops. It will be plummeting.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (2, Insightful)

bugs2squash (1132591) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504604)

I think this is why HALE (High-Altitude Long-Endurance) Aircraft have been proposed as a more reasonable solution

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (2, Informative)

redxxx (1194349) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505528)

well, that and the whole being able to keep a HALE on station. Balloons get pushed around by the wind, so even if they stayed afloat, they would end up where they were you didn't need them.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (4, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504782)

Weather balloons do not 'pop' like common toy balloons.

If you make a tear in balloons fabric - it will slowly descend as the helium inside the balloon leaks.

Of course, if you tear balloon apart - it will fall lake a lead weight. But it's rather hard to do.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (3, Informative)

dargaud (518470) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506252)

If you make a tear in balloons fabric - it will slowly descend as the helium inside the balloon leaks.
No.

I spent a year launching weather balloons from Antarctica [gdargaud.net]. They take about one hour to reach 20~30km altitude, then the latex tears up (remember, as the pressure decreases, the volume increases) and the plummet to the ground in less then 10 minutes. In rare cases what's left of the latex will form a parachute shape and they will drop slower.

If you fill them more, they go up faster and blow up earlier (as the latex reaches its maximum thinness earlier). If you underfill them, you get less buoyancy [wikipedia.org], and they can float for a long time if they don't go up to where they'll pop, which is probably what you want here.

But I have to remind you that:

  • latex is expensive (at least for daily balloon launches, you are OK with your S&M fantasies).
  • helium is very expensive and world quantities are limited and will run out before petroleum does.
  • a standard weather balloon can lift only about 200 grams, which pretty much limits the quantity of battery and thus the wifi power range you can carry.
All that being said I think it's a neat idea, but not as much as solar powered ultra-light drones.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504784)

thanks for your 0.02. we never bothered to consider any of your concerns and after some rethinking we see your point. what a bunch of idiots we are. you'd think after we had built one of the best planned and best executed models in business today that we would consider these simpleton concepts.

thanks again. we must be a bunch of dumb asses. how could we possibly not consider the same aspects of this problem that you pointed out to us?

your friends,

the google people

btw: stfu. you're a moron.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (1)

robertjw (728654) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505364)

That's an awful waste of resources not to mention what happens if someone is transmitting a signal when the balloon in your area pops? How much does all this constant launching and recovering cost compared to just putting in a tower despite the remoteness?

I can see using these balloons for limited times, such as emergencies, or battlefield conditions where there are no cell towers (as the article intimates) but for every day use? I don't think so.
Well, let's speculate on costs a bit.

It's safe to assume that these cost more than $100, or it wouldn't be worth paying a $100 reward for their return, so let's assume $200 per balloon.

One every 8-12 hours is about 2.5/day.

2.5/day * $200 * 365 days = $182,500/year

High altitude balloons should be able to cover significantly more territory than a ground based cell tower. I have no idea of exact range, but let's be conservative and say a balloon could cover the territory of 10 towers.

Looks like there are no good numbers for costs on towers, but some estimates I found say 250K to put one up and around $700/month to lease a piece of property in a rural area.

In the same 1 year time frame 10 towers would cost $250,000 * 10 + $700 * 12 * 10 = $2,584,000

Over 10 years, the cost of the towers, assuming no equipment upgrades, would be $250,000 * 10 + $700 * 12 * 10 * 10 = $3,340,000 or $334,000/year

Of course, this is all speculation, but it is quite possible the weather balloon idea is significantly cheaper than building and maintaining a large number of cell towers.

Cost Analysis (3, Interesting)

maokh (781515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505428)

Every 8 hours means 3 launches a day, or 1095 launches a year.

With even the cheapest base station hardware, helium, balloon (at say, $5000 per unit), costs would exceed $14.6M/year per site.

This does not include the labor to continuously manufacturer, transport, and launch equipment.

At a rate of $50/month per subscriber, you would need about 25,000 to break even on base station--hardware alone. This does not include the uplink facility, bandwidth costs, and business administration costs.

I have seen quite a few telemetry balloon launches and return of balloon hardware has never happened even once. Balloons seem fall in the most remote areas, getting caught in trees, landing in the ocean, etc. If a human ever encounters the hardware, they certainly are not very honest about returning it. Even at a modest recovery rate of 1%-5%, it wouldnt be worth the trouble. This sounds like a major environmental hazard too.

Whoever wrote this business plan is on crack. $15 million a year for the equivalent of 14 base stations?! In a rural area? Instead of using grain silos?

And what is this 'floating gently back down to earth' stuff? Unless they have a parachute, the tranceiver will not be floating gently back down to earth when the balloon pops. It will be plummeting

The FAA has quite a few requirements for balloons, including a) payload to have a parachute apon balloon failure b) radar reflectors so ground controllers and aircraft can see them c) remote "self destruct system" to release balloon, among others.

Sounds unpossible (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505434)

Each box of tricks carries a $100 reward for whoever finds it and returns it safely.


Hmm. I can't help wondering how something that's worth $100 per day to google isn't worth the finder keeping forever.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (2, Informative)

Zach978 (98911) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505938)

Wall Street Journal has a much more complete article [wsj.com] about these balloons, and a video.

According to the article:

The electronic gear they carry, encased in a small Styrofoam box, then drifts gently back to earth on tiny parachutes.
[..]
While the balloons are cheap and disposable at $50 a pop, the transceivers they carry are worth about $1,500. Once a transceiver is released from its balloon to parachute back to earth, there's no way to predict where it will land. So Space Data has hired 20 hobbyists with GPS devices to track them down.

Re:Only a 24-hour lifespan? (3, Insightful)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506254)

And what is this 'floating gently back down to earth' stuff?

How many of the packages can they realistically expect to recover?

"Rural and remote" suggests difficult terrain, dense cover, lakes and ponds, and very few people. I don't think we are talking about the cornfields in Nebraska.

What most puzzles me is why Google wants to enter a market difficult and expensive to service, and with so little prospect of a significant return.

Why not tethered? (4, Interesting)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504646)

It seems that if this company simply tethered their balloons to the ground, they could minimize losses, and thus could afford to deploy far more robust balloons, which could last significantly longer than 24 hours. If a balloon exceeds its life span, sustains damage, or requires maintenance or updates to its payload, it could simply be reeled in as a replacement is reeled out.

Re:Why not tethered? (1)

esocid (946821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504750)

Then you would have to worry about how to keep them afloat for such a long period of time and how high to let them float to send an optimal signal over distance. Plus putting lights on it for night visibility for low-flying aircraft. Just letting them go seems more practical, yet impractical in other areas, such as cost like you mention, as well as balloons that crash in remote areas that no one will ever find. That's an awful lot of equipment to just send up in the air and hope to get it returned.

Re:Why not tethered? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504948)

Nope - tethering is a non-starter.

If you tether the balloon, the altitude has to be very low or else the cable would be a hazard to aircraft. The whole idea is to put these up so high that they are well out of the way of air traffic. Also, the higher you go, the bigger the area you can cover.

Think of these as cheap, low altitude satellites.

Re:Why not tethered? (1)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505078)

You know, it is possible to route aircraft around areas... Aircraft generally don't fly hither and yon, wherever they please...they adhere to approved flight plans.

Re:Why not tethered? (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505300)

Well, they're talking about remote areas so you'll have things like cropdusters, potentially, amongst other possibilities.

Truthfully, I dunno. I live in the city.

Re:Why not tethered? (3, Informative)

Yarrr (1243698) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506038)

Aircraft under VFR flight rules do fly hither and yon, where ever they want (in class G airspace) and flight plans are not always required or even need to be approved. Thats just how SAR finds you when you have an "unplanned landing". There is no requirement for contact with ATC, and you can fly as low as 500 feet AGL, and even lower if the weather is closing in. Sending up 2-3 balloons a day would not be a big deal but making a mesh network of weather balloons, say 20 a day would cause a hazard. Maybe going as far as switching a large area to restricted airspace. Which would require printing of new maps/NOTAMS.

Re:Why not tethered? (1)

The-Perl-CD-Bookshel (631252) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505550)

That adds the additional cost of leasing space from landowners (read: farmers) who are accustomed to getting at least $5,000/year for a small footprint land lease agreement.

Re:Why not tethered? (1)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505592)

True, but that's $5,000/year vs. $36,500/year ($100/day) with their existing model. Even with paying landowners a premium, they still would come out ahead.

no imagination. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504648)

My mind is sorta tripping over how something like this could work, but I gotta admit that the idea is really cool.

I think you have very little imagination

It almost seemed like a good idea... (1)

Damocles the Elder (1133333) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504650)

I could see this working if you run, say, a WAP up with a balloon and use an ethernet cable as a balloon string, but floating them around and having them "float" (ha ha) back down to earth every 24 hours and trusting that someone'll actually see them (as compared to running them over with a tractor in a huge field of what-have-you), AND return them, seems unworkable.

Re:It almost seemed like a good idea... (1)

dohzer (867770) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504908)

Who cares about someone "running them over with a tractor".
I'd be more worried about someone running into it with an aircraft.

Stratellite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504672)

The article describes using short-term balloons:

Balloon-borne transceivers are launched every 8 to 12 hours and last for about 24 hours before bursting and floating gently back down to earth. Each box of tricks carries a $100 reward for whoever finds it and returns it safely.
I wonder if they considered stratellites [wikipedia.org] (stratospheric satellite) or similar technology. The idea there is to have a very-high altitude automated airship that has solar panels on the topside and wireless relays on the underside. It hovers over a given location, providing wireless coverage. The company claims [globetel.net] that they can cover an entire city with a single one. They are intended to stay aloft for months or years (and be reusable). As far as I know it's still more concept than reality, unfortunately. It sounds like a cool idea.

Sorry for the offtopic (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504680)

...but it's for a good cause. You see, scientology has an orginization called OSA and some OSA people's job is to whitewash the internet:

The OSA posters each have a Stat. The stats work
something like this.

+5 point for a an anti psych post
+5 points for a post that slams the critics
+5 points for a post that gets the C of S " line" in.
+10 points for a response.

Bonus Points

+100 points for outing a critic
+100 points for getting the critics fighting among themselves
+500 points for getting a critic to stop posting

Minus points

-5 for degrading posts about LRH
-10 for degrading posts about DM ( Davey is now more important than LRH)
- 5 for degrading posts about the OT levels or mentioning the word Xenu.
-25 for a newly posting critic.

and the biggest of all?

-400 points for an "attack" on upper management (oh, man the IRS thing must have them shitting their pants!!)

The high holy stat week of Scientology is Thursday at 2am to Thursday at 2PM. Posts made on Thursday morning drive them nuckin futz, and posts made after 2pm Thursday starts their week off in the hole.

Also, the reason I spell out the proper names of David Miscavige and L. Ron Hubbard at least once in a post is so that they will be counted. Nicknames for these con-men are often entertaining and fun, but they don't count against OSA stats unless you say exactly WHO you are talking about.



So. OH HAI GUISE I'm a new critic for scientology and I think hubbard was a fraud who lied about everything in his life, David Miscavige is scam artist and liar, OSA is a criminal orginization, Scientology is a crazy UFO cult with the Xenu story, and thier tax status should be revoked.

Posting anonymously for obvious reasons, (since the orginization is criminal), and again sorry for the off topic, and please copypasta or mod up for great justice.

Helium Shortage (3, Informative)

Ilan Volow (539597) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504718)

I wonder how Google plans to deal with the rising cost of helium?

http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/01/14/0219246&from=rss [slashdot.org]

Re:Helium Shortage (1)

KublaiKhan (522918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504802)

Just call it "Project Hindenberg" and announce a commitment to the creation of a hydrogen-based infrastructure.

You'll be all set.

Re:Helium Shortage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22506234)

rising cost of helium Get it...? Rising... Helium...

Liability (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504792)

I would think that there is too much liability involved. Think of the lawsuits after one of these things comes down on a house / car / animal / small child... Or what if a plane slams into one killing a few 100 people. And, who's responsible for the ecological damage of this trash landing in the oceans / lakes / rivers / forest?

From a cute sci-fi sort of view it's "neat-o", but wildly unpractical.

Re:Liability (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22505182)

I would think that there is too much liability involved. Think of the lawsuits after one of these things comes down on a house / car / animal / small child... Or what if a plane slams into one killing a few 100 people. And, who's responsible for the ecological damage of this trash landing in the oceans / lakes / rivers / forest?

I sort of agree with you, but then I think guns/beer/cars...there are lots of other much more dangerous things out there, and there'll always be idjits.

A GPS device makes finding downed bits easier. And I'd bet beer cans, shell casings, cheap lead shot, and air pollution do more wilderness damage in a few hours than this'll ever contribute.

Packets flying through the air (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22504826)

This reminds me of RFC 1149 [faqs.org].

Time for another FOX UFO Special (1)

Vampyre_Dark (630787) | more than 6 years ago | (#22504882)

Featuring an entire small town wearing tinfoil coated trucker caps to hide from those evil, thought reading, transceivers. Cue those blurry night vision shots and man in the rubber Grey mask.

Google has to earn more money (1)

backslashdot (95548) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505106)

Google's stock price is inflated so they need to do stuff like this to satisfy the high forward P/E ratio.

Soon, they'll probably have to get into the hardware biz and compete with companies like Sun, IBM, Apple.

Hmm that brings up the prospect of high end linux laptops, mp3 players, gaming devices, and HDTV's from Google to compete. It could happen. They'll need a top dog designer though.

SEX wiTH A COCK (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22505710)

S5ANCTIONS, AND say I'm packing out how to make the

kinda sorta gotta find a cluebat (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#22505726)

My mind is sorta tripping over how something like this could work, but I gotta admit that the idea is really cool.

Yo! You be trippin' about dis sheeit, but you not be unnerstandin' how fuckin' moronic it make you be lookin', foo. Word.

I speak redneck fluently, too, y'all. It ain't gonna make nobody thank I'm booklarned neither.

The summary was so, shall we say, "unlearned" that I doubt far too seriously that if someone with the lack of communication skills exhibited by the anonymous submitter submitted it, then it can't be worth reading. Did this fellow ever make it past the 8th grade?

The harder you try to be cool, the more uncool you look. Cool people don't try. Just submit the damned story in the English you learned in school, or risk being thought not only a fool but a poser as well.

-mcgrew

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22506004)

Microsoft announces the acquisition of Daisy Outdoor Products (BB guns) in order to head off Google.

Missing the point (1)

spydum (828400) | more than 6 years ago | (#22506150)

If the business model was completely viable, they would already be out there taking over the market, making money. Google isn't interested because its a viable option they can immediately turn around and profit. They are interested because its a non-traditional approach to a common problem. That is what google is about -- thinking differently (sorry Apple!).
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