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Internet Pranks in Schools

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the like-putting-electromagnets-on-your-teachers-dell dept.

The Internet 404

Ferante125 writes "An interesting article about online pranks by students and teachers' responses to them. There are some interesting stats that sounded a little hard to believe. My immature side finds it funny and my more mature side is interested in the legal aspects." For the most part it seems like this article thinks pranks are basically just name calling and flaming on websites.

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FP - The first post !!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22545756)

Got it !!!!!!

I wanted to let you know this is the first post ! I hope I make it !

Does defacing websites count as a prank? (5, Interesting)

hsdpa (1049926) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545776)

Hmm, interesting article. The definition of "prank" isn't just name calling and flaming. We have to re-define the term to include modern equivalent actions that corresponds to the term "prank". What is an acceptable on-line prank and what isn't?

Lame (5, Funny)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545836)

Obviously these students need to be indoctrinated in the latest Internet memes:
There were no rickrolls, and not even a single Longcat reference.

Re:Lame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546062)

I remember once seeing a picture of a horizontal longcat which was cut into pieces such that each monitor in the computer lab had one piece, and the picture was taken at such an angle that the edges of the monitors all lined up and it was a long long long looooooong longcat

Re:Does defacing websites count as a prank? (5, Insightful)

markswims2 (1187967) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545864)

The "pranks" in the article sound like flaming and name calling, which don't seem like much of a prank to me. I would consider defacing websites more of a prank. Of course, all the pranks i remember doing always leaned on the wrong side of the law... moving an office to the hallway... decorating and relocating a car... you know, creative pranks that require time, effort, and a little adrenaline.

Re:Does defacing websites count as a prank? (5, Insightful)

Calinous (985536) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546100)

Moving an office or relocating a car a few parking spaces or so (even decorating it if the decorations can easily be washed off) is not jail material - an judge will look at this and think "why do you waste my time".
      Yet, the article contains this:
"Last month, Charlotte became the second North Carolina school district to criminally charge a student for creating a website that accused a teacher of criminal behavior including pedophilia."
      This sets you on the bad side of the law, and if you don't have any proof, a judge won't be amused.

Re:Does defacing websites count as a prank? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22545880)

What is an acceptable on-line prank and what isn't?
Goatsing an ASP or CFM website?

Re:Does defacing websites count as a prank? (1)

hsdpa (1049926) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546586)

I think that has to go under the "amusing pranks and creation of internet history"-category.

Re:Does defacing websites count as a prank? (3, Insightful)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546728)

I think the law and school authorities need to be absent from the net. I can not imagine how flimsy a line of reasoning can be to allow school authorities to regulate students at home. And then after reading the article I find that the idea that a teacher can claim harm over bruised feelings ridiculous. For example the student may have made fun of the teachers fat legs on the net. But the defect is in the teacher not the student. A person who is so locked in to valuing what others think of them is displaying a mental defect and is not suitable to be employed as a teacher. The real answer for the teacher is to develop a personality that is not crippled by a bit of teasing and perhaps taking some lard off of those hams might be a good idea as well.

I guess I dodged a bullet (4, Funny)

spyrochaete (707033) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545780)

In grade 8 mid-last-decade a friend and I wrote a little BASIC program on our class's standalone Apple IIe something like this:

10 ? "Bwahahaha! I am the Michaelangelo virus!";
20 GOTO 10

This caused a bit of a stir in our class for half a day before we fessed up. I suppose I'm fortunate to have escaped without prosecution.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (2, Funny)

shivamib (1034310) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545866)

OH!!! So it was *you*, insensitive clod! Thanks for teaching me the fine arts of BASIC, though.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (3, Funny)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545894)

I wrote one (on the same "platform") that caused the computer to beep and wait. I copied it to all 25+ computers in the typing lab and ran them so it would beep in succession and then repeat.

I thought it was pretty damn funny, even when I got 25 hours of detention for malicious use of the computer system :roll:

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

spyrochaete (707033) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545924)

That's awesome! My shenanigans were never grandiose enough to involve the whole computer lab. Having used nothing but standalone computers all my life I was too busy being astonished by the realtime local chat client on our Unisys Icon QNX systems.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546166)

Amateur. I hacked into my high school AT&T 3B2 computer running AT&T Unix and replaced the 'login' program with my own rendition that automatically emailed me the password that was entered in the keyboard upon each successful login attempt. Heh. The teacher kept wondering why I always seemed to have his password.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546542)

Making the CD drives eject at random intervals (every hour or so, with 30 PCs in the room) was better :-)

Granted, with your UID you probably didn't have CD drives at school (I remember when I was 10 asking permission to use the single PC with a CD drive to use Microsoft Encarta).

Amateurs... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546626)

On my last day at a job, I wrote a little batch file. It would continually send a message to a username. I'd also used a spare PC, logged in as the admin test account - password for which was "test123". Resulted in the guy apparently not being able to work, because a side effect of NET SEND username is that it followed him wherever he logged on... Apparently took the IT guy nearly a whole day to sort out. :D

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546722)

I thought it was pretty damn funny, even when I got 25 hours of detention for malicious use of the computer system :roll:

Amaratures! When I learned the Novel "send" command in 10th grade I used it for a very funny system wide message and didn't get caught.

Of course I used someone else's workstation to do it ;)

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545910)

Mid-90's and the class computer is an apple ][e? wtf?

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546038)

Not that odd. The //e was in production until mid-1993 and some school districts are poor, and there's a certain amount of inertia, especially if the teachers are all used to the old platform.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

spyrochaete (707033) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546060)

My school district, for both elementary and secondary, was incredibly overpopulated and underfunded. In high school our computers classroom had 30 computers all sharing one 14.4 baud modem for internet access. I probably didn't help people do their work any faster by playing web bingo or using ICQ.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

evilklown (1008863) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546114)

Some of us went to public school. My school (small town in the Midwest) had 3 Apple IIe computers and electronic typewriters in our computer lab until the mid 90s when we got a grant to switch over to PCs. I went back to visit, and although the computer lab has newer PCs, each classroom still has one of the PCs they purchased in the mid 90s.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (3, Interesting)

TofuMatt (1105351) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545950)

My 8th-grade pranks involved exploiting a weakness in the regional school board's network and gaining admin access to the entire system, allowing me to make changes to things on a whim, and have access to every teacher's and administrator's e-mail accounts. My father, who was working as a programmer at the time, was simultaneously proud and miffed.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (5, Funny)

Otto95 (1099755) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546640)

In my day we pulled a prank where we changed the number of beads on the Math teachers abacus. Oh man, I'm old!

Re: I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546104)

Back when Windows first came out, I got into my teacher's autoexec file and commented out the win command to run:

"I am now reformatting your hard drive!" She would turn her computer off and try again.
I set it to loop 500 times. She called the school districts computer "guru" and it took him two days to figure it out.

Re: I guess I dodged a bullet (5, Funny)

spyrochaete (707033) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546178)

It's always the low-tech pranks that take people the longest to fix.

I unintentionally freaked out my poor mom when I got smarmy and edited the Win98 logoff screen in mspaint. I changted a W to a T so that it said "It is not safe to turn off your computer." She left it like that for 3 days until I let her in on the joke. Oopsie.

Re: I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

icebrain (944107) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546690)

I replaced the windows logo in the startup/shutdown with a skull and crossbones on a couple machines... was good for a laugh.

The good old "screenshot the desktop and hide all the icons" worked really well too. Ah, those were the days...

Re: I guess I dodged a bullet (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546232)

Just before graduation, I modified my teacher's autoexec so that, starting a few weeks later, would change his desktop's wallpaper to a picture of cindy crawford with his face.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546306)

I had similar fun with the (Novell-based?) netsend command in a batch file. Given that you spam your sysadmin with popup windows, it's surprisingly difficult to stop for a two-liner.

Re:I guess I dodged a bullet (2, Funny)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546694)

Ah, highschool. That was a fun time. Being the only one who was computer literate, I remember editing the batch file for PFS Write to display messages on other students' screens as they booted.

Once that was figured out, the teacher was getting mad so I made it erase itself once they pressed a key, so when they tried to tattle... Nothing.

I had so much fun with that little prank.

First post! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22545788)

First post!

schools, the net and the generation gap (5, Insightful)

jacquesm (154384) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545790)

If the gap between teachers and pupils is as large as the one between parents and children then it is no surprise that todays teachers really don't know what to do with the technology savvy generation that is about to supplant them.

Schools haven't got a clue about the internet, how to use it and what it could bring them. Pupils are running circles around their supposed betters and are showing earlier in life a degree of independence that teachers wished they had had when they were young. Todays youth are so connected using cellphones, the net and social networking that they are as alien from the previous generation as any that has ever been.

Just wait until it's your turn (4, Insightful)

Silver Sloth (770927) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545868)

With the rate of growth of technology being greater than exponential this gap is just going to increase. We are running into a major revolution in society where the old paradigms simply won't work. The only problem is that those with the authority to make the changes, almost by definition, don't have the understanding.

But then, back in the 60's we thought that we were the misunderstood generation who were going to sweep away all the old farts and bring in the dawning of the age of Aquarius so some things don't change.

Re:schools, the net and the generation gap (5, Insightful)

Atlantis-Rising (857278) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545934)

I really wonder what schools you are talking about.

Yes, there are always a handful of individuals at the cutting edge, not only of technology but of culture. These people existed in previous generations, and they will always exist; in many ways, they operate very similarly across multiple generations, just with a change of medium.

But the vast majority of today's youth also have no clue about the Internet, how to use it, and what it could bring them. They show exceptionally limited independent action and little to no independent thought.

Today's youth may be connected- but there's no real information passing between them.

There will always be a... cutting edge, a group of individuals both as students and as adults, who will find ways to use everything they have available in the best ways possible. This has always been true, and as a rule, people have never really known what to do about them.

Unfortunately, as a student, I have far less confidence in my peers than you seem to.

Re:schools, the net and the generation gap (4, Insightful)

Calinous (985536) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546224)

I've already posted, so I can't moderate - yet, I'd like to bow to the parent and say:
Every generation had its stars, and every generation will have them. And the new generations have higher possibilities (mainly in access to information and possibilities of training), so they can do things the stars of the previous generations could only dream about. All the while, all this new technology makes it easier to work less for those inclined to do so, so the gap between the stars and the rest might even get wider.

     

Re:schools, the net and the generation gap (5, Interesting)

Atlantis-Rising (857278) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546348)

I think this is very true. As a rule, the general 'trend' of knowledge and capability is increasing- we see the percentage of 25 year olds who have undergraduate degrees today is the same as the percentage of 25 year olds who had high school diplomas forty or fifty years ago.

But the maximum, the possibilities, have increased immensely- in 50 years, we've developed in every field, from metallurgy to medicine to computers in ways that would never have been dreamed possible seventy-five years ago.

And, as you posit, our transition to a knowledge-based economy has made it possible for those who aren't interested in self-development to essentially stagnate, comfortably, at an unusual lack of development, especially compared to those who DO focus on development and continue to advance.

The financial gap between the rich and the poor continues to increase; and yes, so does the knowledge gap.

Essentially, I think, you are starting to see a striation into class-like bands in our society- between those who want to develop and advance for advancement's sake and those who merely want to live their lives.

Re:schools, the net and the generation gap (2, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546194)

That's a very positive view but not what I'm observing.

The only generation gap I can see is a dynamic one. These barely literate retards with their social networking sites and mobile phone connectivity , which can hardly be classes as communication, leave school and realise that they "cnt wrt their CV n sms lang", then promptly grow up.

Fundamentally I don't think that technology changes the rules of engagement that much.

internet Pranks vs Internet Pranks (1, Funny)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545794)

Well thank god these aren't Internet Pranks and are instead internet Pranks. Lord knows what teachers would do if they really used the Internet to pull this shit off!

Re:internet Pranks vs Internet Pranks (1)

shivamib (1034310) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545930)

Eh? Sir, could you please be more specific as to what are they pulling off? Thank you.

This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavior! (5, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545858)

In the so-called "Teacher Sux" case in Pennsylvania, for example, a high school student put up a website about a teacher with threats and comments such as "she shows off her fat ... legs."

Critics, however, contend that words like "annoy" and "embarrass" are too broad and may infringe upon First Amendment protections of parody.


Honestly, if she had fat legs and someone pointed it out to her in person would they have criminal/civil court documents filed over it? No, they would get detention/short-term suspension and move on with their lives. The recent rise in people being upset that a co-worker won't speak to them and is "threatening" because they dress in all black and wear sunglasses or that someone doesn't like them is created by this trend in secondary education that teaches people to behave like this.

I just can't understand why a grown adult would not be able to leave the house because some little fucking bastard said she had fat legs on the Internet. Both the adult and the student need to grow up -- fast.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (5, Insightful)

Rampantbaboon (946107) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545926)

Exactly. What do you think is going to happen when you willingly put yourself in posistion of authority over adolecents. I really don't get why labelling things as "online" makes them new and edgy. Making fun of the teachers is going to happen in middle and high schools. It will/has happen(ed) by whatever means of communication kids use. A teacher claiming she can't work because she got made fun of is like a firefighter complaining he can't work because fires are hot.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546284)

... I really don't get why labelling things as "online" makes them new and edgy ...

Because in most people's mind "the intertube[sic]" is like that bit on a map that says "here be dragons".

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (4, Insightful)

joto (134244) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546298)

I really don't get why labelling things as "online" makes them new and edgy.

Because things on the Internet have the potential to (a) be seen by a lot more people, and (b) last almost forever. There's a difference between calling someone a fatass in the classroom or schoolyard, and doing it on youtube.

It will/has happen(ed) by whatever means of communication kids use.

Yes it will happen, but no, it shouldn't happen. There's a difference between descriptive and normative ethics. For example, I have never heard of teachers were the pupils posted posters all over town describing how much they disliked them. And if it happened, I'm sure it would involve a criminal case. Kids need to learn that with greater power (the Internet) comes greater responsibility. If they can't handle that responsibility, they shouldn't use the Internet. Lots of people probably shouldn't (and now I'm talking about posting stuff, not using Internet banking or similar things that everybody needs to do).

A teacher claiming she can't work because she got made fun of is like a firefighter complaining he can't work because fires are hot.

Actually, firefighters do that all the time. Going into a burning building is a very high-risk operation, and you need to carefully examine many factors, including temperature, before you decide to enter. Similarly, school-teachers are, like most people, emotional beings, and if the abuse is to large, they can't continue teaching.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546752)

Because things on the Internet have the potential to (a) be seen by a lot more people, and (b) last almost forever. There's a difference between calling someone a fatass in the classroom or schoolyard, and doing it on youtube.


I don't care if some student calls a teacher a "fatass" on network news, and that clip becomes part of the trailer for the news for the next 50 years. It still cannot be a crime as long as the First Amendment stands. It doesn't even reach the level of defamation; it's just a juvenile insult.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (1)

garett_spencley (193892) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546070)

I just can't understand why a grown adult would not be able to leave the house because some little fucking bastard said she had fat legs on the Internet. Both the adult and the student need to grow up -- fast.

What I don't understand is the complete lack of common sense that these "education professionals" employ.

Most people know that children cross the line at some point in their youth. Making mistakes is part of growing up. It's part of being human. I would think that teachers would realize this better than anyone else. Yet expulsions and getting the law involved for what amount to 21st century versions of what children have been doing for centuries seems to indicate the converse.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (1)

jpbelang (79439) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546090)

Honestly, if she had fat legs and someone pointed it out to her in person would they have criminal/civil court documents filed over it? No, they would get detention/short-term suspension and move on with their lives.
Quite true. But I know of certain circumstances where the teacher has absolutely no authority on anything that happens off school grounds. So the school can't back them up.

It's actually management that's behind.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (5, Interesting)

david@ecsd.com (45841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546344)

Hell, teachers today have little authority on anything that happens on school grounds. My wife teaches elementary music, and even at that age it's a little less than Lord of the Flies because the teachers can do little about behavior and the kids know it.

What is there to do when the kids keep upping the ante and there's no recourse on the school ground? Hit 'em were it hurts. Maybe if parents have to pay for a lawyer for mommy's little bastard's behavior, some parents will start, you know, parenting...

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (4, Insightful)

jandersen (462034) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546216)

Honestly, if she had fat legs and someone pointed it out to her in person would they have criminal/civil court documents filed over it? No, they would get detention/short-term suspension and move on with their lives. The recent rise in people being upset that a co-worker won't speak to them and is "threatening" because they dress in all black and wear sunglasses or that someone doesn't like them is created by this trend in secondary education that teaches people to behave like this.

I just can't understand why a grown adult would not be able to leave the house because some little fucking bastard said she had fat legs on the Internet. Both the adult and the student need to grow up -- fast.
You have a point there - but there is a difference. As the amount of SPAM in most people's inboxes shows, the internet provides us with a terrifyingly efficient way of reaching large numbers of people. If you insult somebody face to face, that is between you and that person, and possibly a couple of people nearby, but what you put n the internet is visible to the whole world. This can easily be an overwhelming prospect for the victim of cyber-bullying. You know, even adults in high positions are just humans, and vulnerable.

Re:This is all ridiculous and breeds future behavi (1, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546438)

You know, even adults in high positions are just humans, and vulnerable.

Oh fuck that. I put up with and shelled out a ton of grief (I still do) in secondary school. You didn't see me hiding inside my house because assholes insisted that because I swam and shaved once a year that I was gay and that was before I was an adult... I expect that an adult be able to handle criticism, especially if it's fucking true.

Hell, just a few months ago I was tipping the scales at 260 lbs and got poked fun at by my buddies, co-workers and people who didn't know me. Did I fucking hide out in my house and cry and say, "woe is me"? No, I fucking did something about it and lost 80 lbs -- sadly now I'm thinner than those bastards who thought it was funny to poke fun and they instead tell me I'm too thin.

You can't win.

Does she have fat legs? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546428)

Does the teacher have fat legs? No harm done then.

If she was afraid to go out of the house, it's the fat legs doing it, not somebody pointing it out. Use some common sense!

Yet another case made for homeschooling... (0, Flamebait)

Notquitecajun (1073646) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545920)

Yet another reason that if/when I have kids, I'm homeschooling. They don't have to put up with juvenile behavior, learn how to socialize from adults and kids I get to choose, and generally stay ahead of the mediocrity known as public education.

No thanks, I'll opt out.

Re:Yet another case made for homeschooling... (3, Insightful)

esocid (946821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546092)

Yet another reason that if/when I have kids, I'm homeschooling. They don't have to put up with juvenile behavior, learn how to socialize from adults and kids I get to choose, and generally stay ahead of the mediocrity known as public education.
Damn that mediocre public education. All it got me was a college degree.
Homeschooling just segregates them even more and inhibits their socialization. The fact that you want to choose with whom they socialize is kind of disturbing. They aren't some sort of pet that you get to train. You should allow children to grow and develop with guidance, rather than follow some sort of path that you want to vicariously travel. In my opinion it's homeschooling that will hinder your potential child's socialization, rather than public schools.

Re:Yet another case made for homeschooling... (1)

John3 (85454) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546144)

Yet another reason that if/when I have kids, I'm homeschooling. They don't have to put up with juvenile behavior, learn how to socialize from adults and kids I get to choose, and generally stay ahead of the mediocrity known as public education.

No thanks, I'll opt out.
Are the public schools in your area really that bad? Are you that concerned about how much influence you will have on your children?

I have two daughters (ages 17 and 14) that are moving through the local public school system. The vast majority of students are well adjusted, doing the usual high school pranks, learning to interact with friends and enemies, girls and boys, teachers and administrators. Occasionally someone at the school does something stupid like posting a compromising video on YouTube or rude comments on Facebook. In the past it might have been graffiti on the bathroom wall, or in notes passed around in class. The Internet has changed the game quite a bit since the students seem to forget how easily their prank can spread to others. We've given children powerful tools that they understand technically but don't fully grasp the effects, and we've got teachers (and other adults) that see the full effects but don't understand the tools.

Getting back to the home schooling idea, I've always wondered how those children will adjust socially once they get to college or the business world. I'm not saying that home schooling is inherently bad, but you certainly face challenges that are as daunting (if not more so) then the challenges you face by sending your children to the public schools. It all depends on the quality of your local school district, and if you're paying taxes then you should get involved to improve the schools anyway.

Re:Yet another case made for homeschooling... (1)

s_mencer (239965) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546436)

No joke. Homeschooled people are not socially adept. I see the faults in public schools, but I will never send my children to private schools or homeschool them. The way I see it, you're trying to control the environment with homeschooling... keeping your kids away from outside influences. But someday, they will have to enter the real world. They will not be prepared.

Re:Yet another case made for homeschooling... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546654)

Some of us were home schooled AND were not that juvenile. I never called my teachers names, or posted insulting information on the web (not that there was much of a "web" in the 80s). If you teach your kids right from wrong, and punish them when they do wrong, and I actually mean punish... then chances are they'll be alright.

The problem really is with each and every passing year we collectively become more and more afraid of saying no to our children. Everything they do is "special," and we'll be damned if we expect more of them. While I was attending class during the day, I was studying piano in the evening (and doing RCM exams), going to Air Cadets, and working a part-time job. Even then most other students at most worked a part-time job, but most just lazed around after class. I even saw 17 and 18 year olds still getting an allowance!!!

For another ex., when I started HS in 96, you could actually fail a class. By time I grad'ed in 2000 (with my OAC and OSSD) you couldn't fail a class unless you really tried hard at it. They changed policies so that students "close to 50%" would get bumped up to pass.

There will always be kids who taunt their teachers, but posting such bs on the Internet exposes the victim to a larger pool of people who may show them contempt or whatever the goal is. I think the punishments for such abuse, especially over the Internet should be severe. For example, getting in fight is bad, bringing a knife or gun to the fight is worse. Insulting your teacher in class is bad, posting their private information and defamatory content on the web is worse.

Getting back to your post though... home schooling is not the answer. Just expect more of your kids as a parent and they'll turn out ok. I mean even if you home school your kid and don't expect them to study something else (music, art, engineering, whatever) they'll still turn out as pretty much a useless tool.

hacking servers (3, Interesting)

musikit (716987) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545922)

i taught for a couple of years as a volunteer teacher for C++ while with a company that was nice enough to give me time off to do this.

one student disliked me so much he hacked AOL's IM database to disable my IM account.

i had evidence it was him as well as people telling me he was bragging about it. at the end of the day i just tossed it up and said "hey he's still a kid making mistakes he'll learn" maybe not the best choice but presenting my evidence to superiors would have ended in blank stares.

Re:hacking servers (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546072)

You're a pussy. This fucking kid messes up with you and you take it like a cock up your ass? Nice, loserboy. Shows how much of a fucking loser you are.

The manly thing to do would have been to confront him away from the school grounds and beat the shit out of him. Fracture his legs with a tire iron. Break his arms in two points. Smash his teeth in. And should the little shit be still moving, stick a switchblade in his kidneys and liver.

Then take a dump on his face. The only way to deal with little shits is to shit back.

But you're a born loser.

Re:hacking servers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546354)

Wow, you just accurately described what your own mother should have done to you as soon as your deformed head squeezed disgustingly from her pulsating, AIDS-ridden twat.

Re:hacking servers (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546346)

"he hacked AOL's IM database"

My ten bucks says you had an easily-guessed password. Most of those little snots talk a big game but can't handle doing anything more advanced than double-clicking the script.

Re:hacking servers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546360)

or he just watched you type in your password at a terminal.

what would you tell your friends... you did something badass, or you blatantly violated someone's physical trust.

Re:hacking servers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546624)

Sorry about that. I have having a bad day.

Re:hacking servers (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546688)

hey he's still a kid making mistakes he'll learn
Not without consequences he won't. That's where the whole "kids will be kids" approach sort of falls on its face and shatters its whole skull.

Depends on the prank... (5, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545936)

Having taught computers to students before, I found quite a few of them.

If it was something dumb and non-harmful, it was good for a laugh... this is where most teachers fail it.

If it damaged an OS install, I'd make the kid stay after school the entire week and re-load every workstation image in the classroom each day.

If it escaped the local network and damaged something else (fortunately I never saw that happen), then the kid gets to face the consequences full-on, and I would've been stuck with preparing a forensics report to show how it happened and what I would do to prevent it in the future.

The point is to make this clear up-front, and if it isn't harmful, use it as a teaching aid. It also helps to know, as a techer, WTF you're doing around the machinery (unlike one Texas teacher who IIRC had a kid arrested for "hacking" because he used Windows Messenger to pass notes in class... can't remember the specifics, but it was a dumb overreaction to say the least).

/P

Re:Depends on the prank... (1)

Pebble (99243) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546476)

The 'pranks' you are talking about have nothing to do with what is described in the article.

Oh sorry, this is Slashdot never mind.

Unlikely Statistic (1)

netpixie (155816) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545940)

".. as many as one-third of American teens regularly post inappropriate language or manipulated images on the Web"

What the hell are the other two thirds doing?

Re:Unlikely Statistic (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546020)

Dating.

Re:Unlikely Statistic (1)

Calinous (985536) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546296)

They only irregularly post inappropriate language or manipulated images on the Web.
      By the way, I manipulate my photos too - red eyes removal, white level change, crop pictures... Even changing resolution could be considered manipulation.
      As for inappropriate language, people that use it in real life will use it on the internet.

Re:Unlikely Statistic (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546572)

As for inappropriate language, people that use it in real life will use it on the internet.
Actually, I'd guess that it's a lot more prevalent online. I very rarely swear at work because, in my work environment, it would look very unprofessional. I very rarely swear at home because (besides almost never finding an occasion that would warrant it), I don't want to get phone calls from my youngsters' school that would require me to explain my stances on profanity to some uptight principal.

But, on /., who gives a shit?

In the old days (1)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545948)

Back in the old days when computers were only just starting to make an appearance in schools, it was a good time for students who rapidly learnt how to use the computers better than their teachers. Changing easy guess passwords was seen to be cool if utterly pointless.

DISCLAIMER: I disavow all knowledge of how it was done.

Weak (1, Insightful)

Eddi3 (1046882) | more than 6 years ago | (#22545968)

According to TFA, one teacher felt hurt because a student wrote, in a personal blog, that the teacher's legs were fat. She felt like she couldn't leave the house.

What a crock of shit. The kids would be gossiping about the teachers in the same way, even if the internet didn't exist. If the teacher cares this much about what her students think, she needs to get a different job. Even the article notes that in most of these cases, it's "incompetent staff members" that can't take it.

If you ask me, the idea of cyber-bullying is ridiculous, except in the most extreme cases (where it's generally against the law anyway, ie, hacking a webcam/phone for observation).

People need to toughen up, IMHO.

Re:Weak (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546502)

Cyber-bullying can be almost as hurtful to a child as verbal face-to-face bullying, IMO, and should be treated in the same way. I think the problem is that much of it occurs outside of school, and it's harder for teachers to see it -- a kid crying in front of his PC at home because 15 others have written that he's a loser on MSN or MySpace or whatever won't be seen by the teacher, but 10 years ago the same kid would have been in the corner of the playground crying because the other kids said the same things verbally -- a good teacher would see this, and watch closely for who's responsible.

Re:Weak (1)

Kamots (321174) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546786)

"Cyber-bullying can be almost as hurtful to a child as verbal face-to-face bullying, IMO, and should be treated in the same way"

You mean completely and utterly ignored?

Strike back! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546042)

From TFA: "But there's been teachers that have left the profession or lost their jobs because of lies that have been told about them".

So the problem are people stupid enough to believe whatever they read on the Intarweb. Well... the solution is obvious! The teachers should post comments about how great they are, the many Nobel prizes and beauty contests they have won, and so on.

Re:Strike back! (1)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546598)

But there's been teachers that have left the profession or lost their jobs because of lies that have been told about them
I know people who have had that done to them (not on the internet, in real life), and it's a pretty serious thing. When an allegation of molestation or child abuse comes out, there's no going back, even if the person was innocent. There's always going to be a group of people that will believe the allegations no matter what. There's also the factor that people only spread the bad news, so twice as many people will hear about the accusations than will hear about the innocence. If they're lucky, they can get a pretty good start by selling their house and moving to another city where people haven't heard the gossip yet.

The unfortunate fact of the matter is that, when child abuse is involved, the authorities take the "guilty until proven innocent, and then only sometimes" approach exemplified by Law and Order: SVU. People have babies taken away for a year because child services doesn't take 15 minutes to see if the parents' story checks out.

Wait 'till they need a job (5, Insightful)

alapbj (1242530) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546064)

Can you imagine the digital trail these kids are unknowingly leaving about their behavior on the net? Even now it's not unheard of to have employers google/myspace their applicants, on top of all the info aggregation services that are running wild out there.

It's going to be a hard lesson to learn (for those that commit serious enough 'offenses') but I strongly suspect that the next generation of kids will know the risks as they get pummeled by their school with "Cyber Bullying awareness" classes and such along with all the other becoming an adult type sex education classes.

Pranks? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546088)

I wouldn't call the things in that article pranks. I'd call them nothing more than bullying or teasing. Granted they're using the internet to push that bullying/teasing to a much bigger audience, but that's all it really is.

Back when I was in high school (gawd I'm feeling really old all of a sudden) back before Windows 3.0 existed, before most people knew what the internet was, I pulled some real pranks. The school had a demerit system that was managed on the same computer system that they used to teach COBOL programming. (Yeah, that's the language they taught us way back then) So one day I hacked into the demerit system and gave a bunch of teachers and the headmaster demerits. Two days later an updated list was posted in the hallway and the whole school saw that the faculty were now getting demerits as well. Now THAT is a prank. While I was there I also did other things like launch fireworks in the middle of the campus on the headmasters birthday, helped move a VW Beetle into the dining room, and launched a helium-filled farewell sign to all the seniors when I graduated. Those are pranks. This article isn't about pranks.

Informative Article (1)

amplt1337 (707922) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546102)

Apparently it turns out that people say mean things on the Internet! And teenagers are not immune to this tendency!

This article has given me a new understanding of the world.

Only American kids pull pranks (1)

CheeseEatingBulldog (703915) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546128)

FTA "Kids have been pulling pranks on teachers and principals since there have been schools in the US, but now there's an edge to it.. And kids in school before the discovery of the US never pulled pranks. Ever.

Obviously nowadays teachers aren't smart enough... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546162)

Back in my day, when the teachers figured out I had basically unrestricted access to the school LAN and could send messages and such, they didn't call the law on me. They simply called me down to the office and told me that they would look the other way and make it worth my while if I would abuse my access to keep an eye on all the other little demons (and show them how to send messages). I learned that work means pay. We didn't even have to get to the threatening phase, and it was fun watching the other kids try to hack the teacher only to learn that they first had to go through me (but they didn't know it was me).

ok seriously people (1)

wondersparrow (685210) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546168)

At what point is society going to get fed up and say "deal with it"? All this bullying and harassment protection crap has gone too far. When i was in school, pranks happened, you dealt with it. Now days people run to the police or courts every time someone calls them a name. I am not saying bullying and harassment are not bad and shouldn't be discouraged, but should it be a legal issue at all. Was i ever expelled when i wrote ~ teacher sux on the wall? whats so different about the internet. suck it up and deal with it. we are breeding whole generations of whiners and complainers. I dread to see what society is going to look like if this keeps up.

Blacksnake? (1)

neoform (551705) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546188)

Dunno, our comp sci classes were pretty low brow, usually, when someone would step away from their computer in class, we'd open a web browser to something dirty like hardcore gay porn, then when they'd return act shocked and horrified as to what he/she was looking at in class.

Re:Blacksnake? (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546590)

Are you at my university? Only last April when I was in the library revising, every time I left my computer unlocked I'd come back to find a zillion windows of meatspin.com on it (I didn't learn).

pranks ONLY in the U.S. (1)

speedy.carr (878612) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546214)

According to the article,

"Kids have been pulling pranks on teachers and principals since there have been schools in the US..."
I didn't realize that the U.S. educational system pre-dated pranks. I bet Plato would disagree...

Sounds Familiar.. (1)

Eddy Luten (1166889) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546230)

This kind of thing got me kicked out of school some 7-8 years ago (not in the US though). And even though the site was created with only "good humor" in mind, teachers tend to disagree. Only after you do it you find out that the joke was on you.

If I could advise any of those kids from personal experience, I'd say: don't f-ing do it, think about it (specially in the CS/IT/ICT field).

When you're 16 this stuff is funny, but when you get older you realize that your future relies on this teacher, regardless of how much of an idiot he/she might seem to be.

my wife is a teacher, and it sucks (5, Insightful)

cornercuttin (1199799) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546248)

this article vastly undermines the severity of this situation.

my wife is a teacher, and believe me, it is bad out there. she teaches 6th grade mathematics, and she is dealing with the internet, bullying, and humiliation on a weekly basis because of it. fortunately, the kids at her school aren't really old enough to know how to create proper websites yet, or dont have the money to sneak small webcams into the classroom, but their internet usage definitely affects the school environment.

with the prevalence of myspace, many kids are threatening each other and bullying each other over the internet (i still dont see how cyber-bullying is possible, since you can always just "not go to that site", but whatever...). they get caught up in the "he said, she said" game, and say some very awful things. teachers are all advised not to have myspace pages or facebook pages, for if they post pictures of them at the beach, at the bar, or even at home, children can and will spin them so that the teacher somehow comes across in a bad light. and the kids are so resourceful that they dont even take into account what a teacher says about themselves. one of my wife's coworkers had a friend sign her "wall" or whatever in myspace, and the comment left made a reference to a stripper or stripping (something along the lines of "you looked like a stipper that night"), and the kids in her class saw the comment and started telling people around the school that one of the teachers was a stripper. of course, this made it all the way to the parents, and they began calling the school. the kids spun something that someone else said, not even what the teacher said.

they are threatening each other, and posting inappropriate material about each other, which is creating fodder for the classrooms. 5th and 6th grade girls are posting pictures of themselves wearing little clothing, talking about their sexual experiences and knowledge online, and are basically begging to be preyed upon. what is worse is that the parents don't know and don't care. people can dismiss it as much as they want, and believe that it doesn't happen or that it is just a small percentage of kids. well, believe me, it is not. it is much worse than you think.

it is a parent's responsibility to know what their child is doing on the internet. those who say that it is "too much work" and that their kid is "smarter than i am" are full of it, because we often do meet the parents who put in the work, who monitor their children properly, and who properly look after their children and prevent this kind of behavior. we know that parents can handle it because there is still a small percentage out there who do it right. the rest of them need to look at themselves, and not their children, and certainly not the teachers.

teachers get paid a small amount of money to do a ton of work. my wife works 10 hour days, gets a 15 minute lunch, and is not only expected to be the one to educate them with the material that the school board deems appropriate (which grows larger every year), but yet she is expected to be their moral educator as well; a job she gladly does. most of them take pride in their work, and believe me, they hate giving out bad grades and low test scores because it makes them look bad. the problem with education these days is not the school, nor the teachers, nor the funding (believe it or not). it is the parents. parents have stopped being accountable. they have stopped checking their kids homework, monitoring their activity, and disciplining their children. they make excuses for their children (ADD, ODD, ADHD...), and often laugh at the behavior that their child is displaying. parenting in america has become a dismal affair.

Re:my wife is a teacher, and it sucks (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546730)

America? Apart from the "nth Grade" references instead of "Year n", I thought you were describing the UK education system and family structure.

Believe me, as an IT Tech in a Secondary school, it's no better over here. I would write a rant, but i'll only end up quiting my job if I get too hyped about it.

Re:my wife is a teacher, and it sucks (2, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546746)

I think you could get cyber-bullying through instant messaging or email. And WWW: even if the victim doesn't visit a page about them (or a picture "of" them) it still exists, and the bullies will still talk about it. Also bullying through exclusion -- I remember the one kid at my school (around 2000) that everyone blocked on MSN Messenger.

If teachers canb't handle it, pull ther computers (0)

Zombie Ryushu (803103) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546252)

If the teachers can't handle it, pull the computers from the K-12 system. Introduce computers at the college level. Since I don't think at the K-12 level, there's anything useful the teachers can teach.

Re:If teachers canb't handle it, pull ther compute (1)

the4thdimension (1151939) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546334)

On the contrary, I began learning computers on my own at about 10 years old but schooling in the field at the 9-12 level really helped me develop into the field I wanted. I was exposed to computer science in high school and now I am nearly done with a degree in it. Holding off on computers until the college level could be HIGHLY detrimental to students, especially those that do not intend to go to college.

If teachers can't handle it, pull the teachers. (1)

onkelonkel (560274) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546564)

Disagree. Computers are just tools. Kids are doing what kids have always done. If the teachers are insufficiently robust to operate in this environment, they should be replaced.

Time to go back to the three R's? (1)

core_dump_0 (317484) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546390)

Nothing new - this has been going on for quite some time. I remember when I was in high school (~10 yrs ago) there were "(school district)sucks.com" sites set up which included defaced pictures of the faculty. I know I used to get the teachers angry by playing "Word 97 Pinball." [eeggs.com] Others got in trouble for hacking the school's networks, or viewing online pornography.

Perhaps these problems mean it's time to get rid of the computers and concentrate on the three R's again?

My pranks (0)

edmicman (830206) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546510)

Back in early HS we had a BASIC programming class....it was the only programming class offered and was braindead easy. We've get our work done and then play Quake on the network....but caused some mischief, too.

The PCs were Win95, and one of my friends had a co-op thing where he'd be home while I was in class. I'd send him the IPs of the different workstations in the lab (come to think of it, why were they public IPs?) and he'd WinNuke them from his house. It was great watching the teacher's computer BSOD and she'd have no idea why it was doing what it was doing. As soon as she got it back up and going, it would happen again. We'd do it to some other student's PCs and they'd lose their work, too. Heh.

Also, we had Novell DOS logins to log in to. I made a BASIC program that looked similar to the login, even approximated the Novell red color. I'd load this up to run on startup, and when someone "logged in" it would display random graphics and sounds, making them think they'd broke something.

Sigh....it's sad that things like that today would probably get me expelled or worse....

It's Kinda Scary (1)

six6un (1175773) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546518)

I saw some of you talking about hacking teachers e-mails and so on. I work at a local school district. If the kids could get some of the teachers passwords... well lets say it will be job security for me. All the grades and attendance are done on web based programs. If a student got their teachers password they could change all the grades and attendance records. And I know some of the old school teachers may keep a hard copy of all the grades but some of the younger ones maybe not. So yeah, the whole hacking thing could be bad thing now. But at least we try to keep a couple steps ahead of them and only allow so much access under their own logins.

net send (1)

Digi-John (692918) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546648)

Back in high school, I used to ssh to my on-campus Linux box (I was running a cluster in the computer lab) and use smbclient to send those Windows popup messages; I think it's called "net send" under Windows. The best part was that you could specify who it should appear to be from, so I could send stuff as God or whoever. That's a prank. If I had used it to send a message to the teacher saying, "You have fat legs", that would be more on-par with the article.
Kids these days, I tell ya. In my day, we had to chisel the bits onto stone tablets and push them uphill both ways to the server room, and we were happy to have it!

Tech-savvy Teenagers? (1)

Cytlid (95255) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546700)

I stopped right there. Um, harassing people on a website doesn't exactly make you "tech-savvy". Also, calling teachers names, passing notes, etc, has probably gone on for centuries. This is nothing new. I didn't care for the tech-savvy label, since places like MySpace make it so easy to throw up a website even a braindead monkey could do it.

I think the teachers should up their knowledge on the subject, and confront the kids themselves. Teach them a little bit about the real world.

I woulda Been tossed from E. Bridgewater Schools (0, Troll)

haplo21112 (184264) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546710)

Its a damn good thing we didn't have the Web back when I was in school.

The things I would have had to say about Good-Old East Bridgewater High School, MA would have probably gotten me locked up!

I had the privilege to attend school taught by the most incompetent collection of Idiots, Bitches, and Assholes that ever staffed a school. There were a few rare exceptions, a couple good teachers here or there. For the most part that school owes me for wasted time attending that Jungle Gym, and the IQ points that they shaved off due to me my having to mix with those worthless assmonkeys.
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