Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Kimchi in Space

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the use-a-pencil dept.

Space 270

rtknox00 writes "For astronauts spending months in space, the smallest touch of home can make a big difference. So when South Korea's first astronaut Ko San boards the International Space Station this April he'll be bringing along a hefty supply of kimchi, the national dish of his native country. While bringing a cherished food on a long journey might seem like a simple act, taking kimchi into space required millions of dollars in research and years of work." Science may never get Thorramatur in orbit.

cancel ×

270 comments

Awesome! (5, Funny)

jimbobborg (128330) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546254)

Yes, it's nice that they are allowing this, however, I suspect that the smell will permeate everything in the station. Just saying.

Re:Awesome! (5, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546398)

Better than the smell burritos make AFTER they have been eaten.... I would hate to be aboard the first ship that stows away something from burrito king....

Re:Awesome! (5, Funny)

UnanimousCoward (9841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546568)

Dude, you know not of what you speak. Being an expert on vernacular-food-related flatulence:

f(kimchi) >> f(buritto)

If you've EVER been on a bus in Korea ... number10 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546846)



If you've EVER been on a bus in Korea you know that this is not a good thing.

Morning breath has nothing on Kimchi breath.

On the other hand, Koreans say the same thing about Beef breath. Number 10 !!

Touche'

Re:Awesome! (4, Informative)

AmaDaden (794446) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546970)

If that's true there is some terrible news at the end of the article...

They say kimchi's short shelf life has made exporting it expensive because the need for refrigeration and rapid transport. That has added to the cost in importing countries, limiting sales.

"During our research, we found a way to slow down the fermentation of kimchi for a month so that it can be shipped around the world at less cost," Mr. Lee said. "This will help globalize kimchi."

Re:Awesome! (5, Interesting)

stuntpope (19736) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547156)

I recently read an article about a famous western chef who spends a lot of time in Korea, who tries to popularize Korean cuisine and use its influences in his cooking.

He was blunt about kimchi, stating that Koreans need to stop touting kimchi as their finest example of cuisine and westerners' first introduction to Korean food. Instead, they should focus on other Korean delicacies that are more likely to be agreeable to western palettes. If kimchi is the first Korean thing westerners eat, many will stop there and won't bother trying Korean food again. I know Koreans really love their kimchi, but it really is a very different taste for Americans. Nothing like a bowl of garlic and onion kimchi for breakfast, yum... Not!

Re:Awesome! (5, Funny)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546824)

You aparently never have eaten Kimchi before.
I dated a half Korean girl, her mom used to make it all the time.
The stuff smells like the ass of a dead dog, tastes great, but leaves you with Montezumas revenge 10x worse than Taco Hell ever thought about doing.

Why in space?
Because in space no one can hear your scream.

Re:Awesome! (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546848)

The hell with kimchi in space...what about BEER?!?!?

Re:Awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546856)

Montezuma's revenge! hahahahaha, that's classic. MOD PARENT UP +1 FUNNY!

Re:Awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22547308)

After living in Korea for four months and eating Kimchi at every meal. (It's served with every meal including breakfast) I would be concerned for the station's plumbing system. Kimchi == Korean Draino

Re:Awesome! (5, Funny)

Translation Error (1176675) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546404)

Just wait until someone wants to bring his beloved durian aboard.

Re:Awesome! (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546660)

Cannibalism could be a problem. Research to get humans into space is already done but I'm thinking that's going to be even less popular with the rest of the crew than durian.

Well, at least... (4, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546406)

it's not durian [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Well, at least... (4, Funny)

raddan (519638) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547206)

Funny story about that. A coworker of mine married a Vietnamese woman, and seeing as how they both love durian, they decided to have a durian wedding cake. Now, since the wedding was held in the US, most of the guests were, shall we say, unfamiliar with the fruit. The highlight of the evening was a small child who took a bite of the cake, and who burst into tears crying, "I can't make the taste go away!". My first experience with durian (in bubble tea) caused my colleagues at the table to start to complain that the restaurant must have seated them next to a trash can-- until they realized the smell was coming from my drink. Ahh, there really is nothing like durian in the West.

Re:Awesome! (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546596)

The people who modded this funny obviously never were in a room where kimchi had been opened.

Re:Awesome! (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546768)

Heh - I just hope they have some really, really good methane filters in the station's HVAC system.

It won't be the food that'll stink up the place so bad, but the unholy farts that can be generated afterwards.

(The stuff tastes great when it's done right --especially the hotter Winter stuff-- but it damned sure reeks to high Heaven on both ends of the digestive tract...)

/P

Re:Awesome! (1)

stuntpope (19736) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546986)

Not only does it permeate the surroundings, the over-powering garlic smell emanates from the eater of it as if seeping from their pores. Plus, it's not for nothing that there is the term "kimchi fart". Having it sit around on the plate or opened jar is not so noticeable, it's the eating of it, or worse, heating it up, that is so smelly. As for anything else in the refrigerator, well, how about a nice glass of oniony-tasting milk?

Millions of dollars? Years of research? (3, Funny)

monomania (595068) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546258)

...there goes my haggis.

Re:Millions of dollars? Years of research? (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546288)

More haggis for us, then.

Re:Millions of dollars? Years of research? (4, Funny)

aproposofwhat (1019098) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546540)

But you can't take a haggis into space - what if yon beastie escapes and runs round and round in wee circles, because everyone knows that the legs on one side are shorter than the other, what with them living in the hills...

kimchi (0)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546262)

is cabbage

Re:kimchi (3, Informative)

Drathos (1092) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546328)

Not always. I've had several kinds of Kimchi with no cabbage in them whatsoever.

Re:kimchi (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546668)

I know. "kimchi is cabbage" was a cd title I saw in a used cd store once. Years ago, in Chicago. Whenever anyone mentions kimchi, I am completely controlled by an irresistible urge to blurt it out. There are all kinds of kimchi, though I believe cabbage is the most common.

Re:kimchi (1)

Eddi3 (1046882) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546358)

Actually, it's pickled cabbage. And it has a... *strong* smell.

Re:kimchi (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546574)

So, it's essentially sauerkraut?

Re:kimchi (5, Funny)

crazyeddie740 (785275) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546720)

Yes, and World War II was essentially a frank exchange of opinion.

Re:kimchi (4, Informative)

jafiwam (310805) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546906)

Yes, if you are looking for a "Western Food" analog that would get everybody to understand quickly.

There's one HUGE difference though, kimchee is not typically cooked when it's made, whereas sauerkraut is cooked. Both are fermented I think it's the same micro-biology that does it though. And kimchee has at least garlic, usually hot spices, ginger and FISH SAUCE (fermented juice from preserved fish) in it. I use the purified form of the latter, along with usually one or two cans of drained and crushed anchovies for flavor.

The cool part is that the vitamins in the kimchee stay intact, so you get the vitamin C that was in there along with what is created during fermentation. So if you are in an agrarian society and need a supply of vitamins for the winter, kimchee works well. If you have gut problems it will overwhelm whatever bugs are ailing you, and it gets a slow moving gut running like a well-oiled shotgun if you need that.

For the uninitiated, kimchee is rather offensive stuff. But properly made home-made kimchee is a comfort food that does wonders. I go from cranky and anxious to happy and relaxed with a few mouth fulls of the stuff. I need to make another batch, am on my last jar come to think of it.

Re:kimchi (3, Informative)

Yokaze (70883) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547056)

> There's one HUGE difference though, kimchee is not typically cooked when it's made, whereas sauerkraut is cooked.

Sauerkraut is not cooked, when it is made, for exactly the reasons you cited in kimchi.

Re:kimchi (1)

jafiwam (310805) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547168)

I stand corrected.

Is it cooked when it's canned? It always seems to me like it's "dead", where as kimchee will bubble and froth if you had the jar closed because the microbes are still alive doing their stuff.

Re:kimchi (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22547234)

Ahh, that's the problem. You're getting the canned stuff. Avoid canned kraut and get the stuff in bags. Much much higher quality.

soylent green (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546400)

is people!

Re:kimchi (1)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546498)

kimchi is rotten cabbage with fermented garlic. Or maybe fermented cabbage with rotten garlic. Regardless, it smells horrible and your breath smells horrible.

The Japanese have long called the Koreans garlic eaters as a derogatory name. (There's no love lost between the Koreans and the Japanese. Their mutual animosity goes back at least a thousand years.)

Re:kimchi (2, Interesting)

gnick (1211984) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546680)

The Japanese have long called the Koreans garlic eaters as a derogatory name. (There's no love lost between the Koreans and the Japanese. Their mutual animosity goes back at least a thousand years.)
That's true. But, from what I've seen, the Japanese call most people who are not Japanese derogatory names [wikipedia.org] ...

Re:kimchi (1)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546748)

Don't most cultures? Look at the 'immigrant' debate in the US....

Anyway, the standing joke in Japan was that when you first arrive, and you don't know anything, you're a baka na gaijin (stupid foreginer). Once you've been there a while, and you learn the customs and language, you're a henna gaijin (strange foreigner). As always, best to be taken with a dose of humor.

Re:kimchi (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22547020)

Don't most cultures? Look at the 'immigrant' debate in the US....

You mean the illegal immigrant debate?

I haven't heard much debate about legal immigrants.

Coca-Cola (1)

pipatron (966506) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546264)

What about Coca-Cola? No geek can go without it.

Re:Coca-Cola (5, Informative)

hakubi (666291) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546314)

They tried this awhile ago. You can't have carbonated beverages in a near-weightless environment because belching would result in vomiting up your food. As a result, the Coke had to be flat. Basically, it tasted really nasty and they've not tried it since that I know of.

Re:Coca-Cola (1)

MosesJones (55544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546340)

Coca-Cola? Hand in your geek card now.

Valid answers are the likes of Red Bull and other energy drinks that are banned in some countries because of the amount of stimulants in them. Also acceptable are amounts of coffee that are either measured in gallons or espresso and Turkish coffees.

The basic rule is that a geek drink should contain so much caffeine or other stimulants that your heart stops, thus requiring another mouthful to get it started again.

Coke? Hell even Arts Majors drink that.

Re:Coca-Cola (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546514)

There's a new one here in Ireland call "burn", dunno if it's elsewhere. In addition to the usual caffeine and taurine, it is laden with theobromine [wikipedia.org] (the chemical in chocolate that kills dogs, though humans can metabolise it in moderate quantities). The buzz from it is quite nice (like drinking 10 mochas I guess), but it carries a warning "not for pregnant or lactating women"...

Re:Coca-Cola (1)

Albert Sandberg (315235) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546972)

... which is from the coca cola company, they just want in on the energy drink action... but it tastes quite ok though :)

Re:Coca-Cola (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546860)

You should perhaps look at the Mana Potion on Thinkgeek. Twice the caffeine of a Red Bull, and 1/6th of the size.
Pop a couple penguin mints, down them with one of these, and Barry Allen (Wally for the younger crowd, Jay for all the older folks) will resign his job to you.

Some advice chief (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22547058)

You're not funny.

No, seriously, I'm not trolling you, you're just not funny.

NO NO NO, don't think of some stupid reply, YOU ARE NOT FUNNY. It's not up for debate, you aren't funny, end of discussion.

I'm sure you're a bright guy, so stick to posting information and not joke, because YOU ARE NOT FUNNY.

If someone told you otherwise, they're wrong.

Re:Coca-Cola (1)

Higaran (835598) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546384)

Yea, coke what are you thinking, you must have never tried Jolt or Bawls those are geek drinks.

Uh (1, Insightful)

afidel (530433) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546266)

Millions? How many scientist man years does it take at ~$300K/year to study a single food item?

Re:Uh (1)

contraba55 (1217056) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546420)

Guess cabbage is pretty complicated... Can only hack it with a knife

Re:Uh (1)

MrMr (219533) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546452)

About 0.1.
But they also needed:
a project manager with secretarial staff at 600K/year
at least two IP lawyers with secretarial staff at 1000K/year
a PR department fully staffed at 1000K/year
a HR department to make sure the right people are hired at 300K/year
an IT department for all of the above at 600K/year
a building with sufficient parking space at 200K/year
a pound of cabbage.

Have you smelled Kimchi? (1)

Sgt_Jake (659140) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546522)

It smells nasty. I don't know what the research was, but I bet it started with "Dude - how long has this $*t been in the fridge?". The other scientist said "back off man, that's my lunch. I'm taking to the international space station." An argument amongst scientists ensues, research grants are approved, and the dude with the Kimchi won. And if he doesn't eat it in the air lock, the others are going to kill him.

Re:Have you smelled Kimchi? (1)

ksheff (2406) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546998)

No kidding. Some guys at college ate that stuff and it would stink up the entire floor. Anyone that gets on the ISS in the next year or so will be muttering "F@#$#%@#$ Koreans" due to the stench.

Re:Have you smelled Kimchi? (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547312)

LMAO- If only I hadn't already RTA & posted on this, I've got mod points...
Actually I think the existing air purification must be one of the seven wonders of the modern world, and if it ain't, I don't think you could give me a ticket up there.

Re:Uh (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546548)

Scientists working with no equipment or supplies could take a very long time to make much progress at all.

Creating or purchasing custom equipment and infrastructure is a huge expense. (Guys in their basements have lower infrastructure costs, but much worse success rates.)

Re:What country? (4, Insightful)

TheMeuge (645043) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546600)

Where do scientists earn $300k/year?

In the U.S., you have to be a tenured department chair, with a Howard Hughes fellowship or the likes of it... in order to make $300k/year as a scientist. I figure about 0.001% of all scientists fit that bill.

Graduate Students: $0 - $25k/year ($40-60k/year in the industry, as a technician)
Post Docs: $25k-35k/year ($40-100k/year in the industry, as a junior scientist, i.e. technician)
Fellows: $35-50k/year
Assistant/Associate professors: $50-60k/year
Full Professors w/o fellowships, etc: $60-150k/year

The vast majority of all scientists in the U.S. have trouble making ends meet... not earning $300k/year... and I am talking about the BIOMEDICAL scientists, who are the HIGHEST PAID.

Re:What country? (1)

thefear (1011449) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546782)

I wish I could mod you insightful....

Re:What country? (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546980)

A scientist making $150K/year probably has a total cost to their employer close to $300K/year once all the ancillaries including retirement are factored in.

Re:What country? (1)

vajaradakini (1209944) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547288)

Actually, as an astronomy grad student I get paid more than biology grad students at my school. Even the ones with some external funding (i.e. NSERC) which I don't have. I doubt that physics and astronomy graduate students are the highest paid either.

Re:Uh (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546702)

Well, because it is extremely expensive to put anything into orbit. You want to make sure that it won't cause problems.

For example:

- Will the air filters handle the aromatic chemicals given off? You can't just open the windows.
- Will it survive the g-forces of liftoff?
- What is the shelf life? How perishable is it?
- Does it break down easily for the sanitation system?
- Will it react with other things?
- Is it easy to prepare and eat in microgravity?
- Does the smell annoy other astronauts and reduce their productivity?

When it costs millions (billions?) to send things into orbit, these aren't trivial questions.

Taste (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547070)

I am not a Korean, so I guess I'm just talking out of my ass: If you've been eating a lot of live kimchi for your whole life, maybe it would take a lot of research to invent an acceptable tasting dead version. Real kimchi, or at least what I've seen, is a pretty lively brew. Definitely too exciting for space travel. I imagine this program will actually match some of the hype as far as promoting commercial kimchi. I suspect if they only counted irradiation-based processes the research cost would have been far less.

mm.. (5, Funny)

newbie56k (1245896) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546286)

So thats where our tax money went... researching the fluid mechanics of kimchi in 0 g..

reminds me (1)

arabagast (462679) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546318)

of this [wikipedia.org] little "delicacy". mm, boiled sheep head.

The Kimchi has gotten loose! (4, Funny)

the_skywise (189793) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546336)

The spice! It's in my eyes! AUUUGHH! It burns!! The goggles... they do nothing!

Well, I guess... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546368)

in space no one can hear you fart.

Re:Well, I guess... (5, Funny)

catdevnull (531283) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546396)

If I had mod points, I'd promote this to +5 funny. I laughed so hard I farted myself.

"Prepare to experience chaos" (3, Funny)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546758)

Might actually be useful in space.

Re:"Prepare to experience chaos" (2, Funny)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546850)

Might actually be useful in space.

In space, it's denoted by its proper and full title: Fermentation Augmented Rectal Transport System.

(wait for it...)

/P

Re:"Prepare to experience chaos" (4, Funny)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547192)

At this point I'm forced to ask where you got your nickname...

dangerous precedent (1)

OglinTatas (710589) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546376)

I thought they banned "Mexican night" on the ISS because of the limited air supply, but they are letting this guy take his spicy sauerkraut? This kimchi thing sets a dangerous precedent.

Fresh Kimchi? (4, Informative)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546408)

I see they were taking it already canned, but why not get it freshly fermented? The hard part about Kimchi is the fermentation step. Since you can't bury it in the ground as tradition requires, they've fortunately come up with a patented fermentation system [freepatentsonline.com] :

A Kimchi fermentation or cool storage apparatus comprises a chamber for either fermenting or coolly storing Kimchi, the chamber being formed of a hollow barrel with opened upper end; a cover for either entering or enclosing the chamber; a thermoelectric module for heating or cooling the chamber, the thermoelectric module being mounted on the outside of the bottom wall of the chamber; a power supplying section for supplying electric power with the thermoelectric module; a temperature sensing section for sensing the interior temperature of the chamber; and, a microprocessor for receiving the temperature signal from the temperature sensing section, for controlling the power supplying section to keep the chamber at a reference fermentation temperature for a predetermined time duration while fermenting Kimchi, and keep the chamber at a reference storage temperature while coolly storing Kimchi.
I know people complain about the high costs of our space program, but the spin-off technologies make our lives so much better.

Re:Fresh Kimchi? (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546532)

You know... I have a big (gallon) jar that I just stick in the fridge for a few weeks. Works fine!

Re:Fresh Kimchi? (3, Interesting)

wodgy7 (850851) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546634)

Believe it or not, those kind of high-tech kimchi refrigerators are *huge* in Korea now. They're pretty much the #1 "must have" home appliance in Korea. There's a good Wikipedia article: Kimchi fridge [wikipedia.org]

Re:Fresh Kimchi? (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546756)

I see they were taking it already canned, but why not get it freshly fermented?
Yes, I can see it now: A kimchi jar in the corner... Perfict. NASA could spend millions on the technology, but Hyundi will bring it in for $7599.99...

Ehe Future (3, Interesting)

pizzach (1011925) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546418)

I can't wait until we see kimchi commercialized in this new form. Maybe it will be something like instant ramen noodle is to us now?

Only one 'r' in 'óramat' (1)

BadDoggie (145310) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546474)

And it's not a "comfort food" by any stretch of the imagination. It's pretty much eaten only out of respect for one's ancestors.

Re:Only one 'r' in 'óramat' (1)

UnanimousCoward (9841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546672)

Okay, I'll bite on this troll-of-a-msg. You're kidding, right? I know lots of NON-Koreans who consider it comfort food.

And it's not a "comfort food" by any stretch of the imagination. It's pretty much eaten only out of respect for one's ancestors.

Great idea (1, Flamebait)

Stanislav_J (947290) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546480)

Bad enough any space station eventually ends up smelling like a men's room in Jersey City after a while.....they really want to add kimchi to the mix?

I encountered kimchi once. Imagine, if you will, the stinkiest, foulest, most gag-inducing fart you have ever smelled. Kimchi is worse.

Re:Great idea (0, Flamebait)

kamapuaa (555446) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546696)

Kimchi is pretty good. I'm not Korean but it's pretty common in Hawai'i, it obviously has a smell but I've never heard anyone complain about it. I can't imagine what kind of white-bread Twinkie-eating motherfucker you must be, to have only tried it once, and thought it was so revolting.

Re:Great idea (3, Funny)

Stanislav_J (947290) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546900)

...what kind of white-bread Twinkie-eating motherfucker you must be...

Hey -- how did you find out about both my diet and my sexual habits? See -- this is why we need protection of our personal data....

I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546494)

Kimchi stinks when you cook it. It just does. Especially in a microwave. Ye gods, the stench.

At least if the Korean's gastronomy is used to it, he won't foul the air twice.

But the Westerners had better lay off the stuff, or there will be hell to pay.

Re:I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546560)

Dude... you're not supposed to cook kimchi.

Re:I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

UnanimousCoward (9841) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546632)

Dude, you CAN cook kimchi. It is the essential ingredient in one of my wife's favorite dishes [wikipedia.org] ...

Dude... you're not supposed to cook kimchi.

Re:I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546706)

Well I'll be damned. Looks tasty ^__^

Dude -- ever been to Korea? (1)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546698)

They cook it. The boil it, stew it, and bake it; they put it in salads, sandwiches, and snack trays.

But I'll grant you that it doesn't smell bad unless you cook it, so I'd certainly agree that it's something best not done.

Re:Dude -- ever been to Korea? (1)

jafiwam (310805) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546938)

If you shake the juice off and pat it dry, it makes a pretty damn good gin martini garnish too.

Re:I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

stuntpope (19736) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547350)

Kimchi soup, anyone? My wife often spoons the kimchi out of the jar and into a saucepan, then boils it. This makes my eyes water and the entire house will smell. Love may be blind, for me, it must be olfactory dysfunctional.

Re:I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

Schmendr1ck (658453) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546744)

I'm a caucasian American who has been to Korea twice, and I love kimchi. And I don't recall fouling the air too badly, or at least nobody told me if I did. The smell and taste seem to vary, probably depending on how long it has fermented before you eat it. Kimchi isn't normally cooked, but I've eaten it grilled once and it didn't stink at all (though that kimchi was relatively mild to begin with).

If you RTFA, you'll find that the "space kimchi" has been irradiated to stop the fermentation process, and has been treated in some way to significantly reduce the smell. Those steps should produce a kimchi that is milder and potentially less offensive to the non-Koreans on board.

Re:I pity the poor astronauts. (1)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547088)

Ditto. I've been to Korea twice. The Kimchi varied, was never too offensive and I have no memory of it smelling too bad. It didn't make me fart. I think people are making this stuff up.

However there is nothing to compare in nastiness to the icky, squishy, fishy stuff I had to eat at some super classy Seoul restaurant, except maybe the silkworm lavae they sell on the street to kids.

 

Ugh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22546500)

Just flying from NYC to Seoul on Korean Air is bad enough. Can't imagine being stuck in a confined space with all of the pre- and post- digestive smells associated with kimchi and the astronaut consuming it.

Kimchi and alpha-galactosidase (2, Funny)

BStorm (107974) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546520)

The space stations is a small enclosed space with air recirculating. The other astronaunts will thank South Korea for spending the millons of dollars ensuring that Kimchi is safe for space. Without the addition of alpha-galactosidase things could potentially get really nasty the day after eating Kimchi. The thought of the astronauts moving around the cabin being "jet propelled", leaves a silly grin on my face.

But what about Greep? (1)

Borealis (84417) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546554)

I think the subject says it all.

Kimchi (1)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546606)

Love it, but only with a lot, a lot of beer.
The problem with Kimchi is the farts.
Those farts can kill rats at a hundred yards.

Re:Kimchi (1)

Is0m0rph (819726) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546834)

I've worked in South Korea quite a bit and have eaten tons of Kimchi, even as low as eating it at the cafeteria of the plant I was working at. And I can attest that arizwebfoot does not lie and I would not want to be abort a sealed station with a hefty supply on board. They better have some top notch air scrubbers.

Troubleshooting (2, Funny)

snowful (1231472) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546658)

"Just a moment. Just a moment. I've just picked up a fault in the AE-35 unit. It's going to go 100% failure in 72 hours."

Dak-Ho, would you suit up and go check that out, please?

What about his fellow travelers? (4, Funny)

jht (5006) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546674)

Taking kimchi up in space - man, the smell of that stuff is brutal - and in space, you can't exactly crack the windows when he starts farting now, can you? Seriously, just because you _can_ take a smelly, nasty food up in space because people of your ethnicity eat it doesn't mean you _should_ take it up. There's the "bringing home with you so you don't get so lonely" deal but there's also the "having to live in a confined space with several other people that have nothing in common with you" deal. And bringing food that has a >0 chance of really bugging your fellow astronauts isn't the greatest idea. What's next, having an Icelandic astronaut bring some håkarl up, too?

oblig. south park (1)

holywarrior21c (933929) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546812)

hope the astronauts kept themselves ouf of PF Chang's. Wait to see biggest poop in space in April!

Better Bring Some For Everyone (1)

aquatone282 (905179) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546870)

Ever been in an elevator in Seoul in the summertime? My advice to his fellow astronauts is to dig in so your, um, aromas blend together. . .

Reminds me of the M*A*SH episode. . . . (3, Interesting)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546898)

where the ever diligent Frank Burns saw some Koreans burying mines or bombs in a field near their base. He went out with metal detectors and a few helpers to find and remove these nefarious devices. Hawkeye and B.J. tagged along to see how things went.

Needless to say, Frank finds one of these bombs and uncovers it. As he's standing there practically gloating to Hawkeye about being right, Hawkeye promptly opens the top, to Frank's evident distress, at which point a pungent odor wafts into the air. Hawkeye then lets Frank in on what's been happening and explains these are kim-chi pots the villagers are burying.

Funny what one can learn from watching t.v.

Food. What you are used to eating (5, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546952)

In my own experience, if you live in a place long enough you adapt to the food such that you feel just as weird going "back in the other direction". I remember walking around a western supermarket for the first time in years and thinking "Ok, what the hell am I supposed to eat here".

Time to adapt for me personally; 2-3 years, and 3 years tops. After that, no craving for food that you were previously used to eating. You get totally localized.

I guess my point is, instead of packaging food that is obviously unsuitable for the purpose (because it fucking stinks for one), why not train to live on food that is especially suitable for space flight.

How Ironic will it be (1)

Phoenix666 (184391) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546992)

when you can get Kimchi in orbit, but not on the Upper East Side? My Korean girlfriend and I once went on a quest to find kimchi at a store near her apartment on 72nd and Lexington. The response from every store (Gristedes, D'Ag, etc.) was "Kim-what?"

The durian lobby is en route to JSC as we speak... (1)

jpellino (202698) | more than 6 years ago | (#22546996)

The space program has started down a slippery - and stinky - slope.

kimchi isn't much of a problem (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547008)

the problem will be when the first astronaut from lichtenstein insists on bringing his limburger cheese

ugggh

try living in a tin can with the permeating odor of certain cheeses and millions of dollars will be needed to spent on suicide prevention measures

as it is, i believe astronauts have a problem with fungus and foot odor already

hmmm... on the other hand, maybe that actually prepares them well for limburger cheese, and it will be well tolerated?

just wait until the first indonesian or thai or filipino (a malaysian already went up) in space insists on bringing durian [wikipedia.org]

A family project (1)

engineerofsorts (692517) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547106)

In my mixed=heritage family, whenever we serve kimchi, everyone in the house eats if for defensive/non-offensive reasons. If everyone has a mouth full, the odor is no problem.

Little small (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#22547118)

Can we make it bigger next time?

Wait? Kimchi not Katamari? Aww. I thought they finally put a PS2 in the space station...
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...