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Gaffes That Keep IT Geeks From the Boardroom

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the to-say-nothing-of-the-pocket-protector dept.

It's funny.  Laugh. 652

buzzardsbay writes "Yes, it's all in good fun to point out the mismatched belt and shoes and the atrocious hairstyles, but honestly, I'm committing three of these errors right now! Is that why I can't get a key to the executive washroom? Or is it my rebellious attitude and pungent man-scent that's keeping me down? The shocker in here was pigtails on women... I love pigtails on women!"

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Slashdot (5, Insightful)

youthoftoday (975074) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570446)

Trying to get first post is a classic sign

Re:Slashdot (1)

snowful (1231472) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570452)

Yes, but are you aware of your Fashion Feng Shui?

Re:Slashdot (5, Funny)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570504)

But in I.T. I'm only concerned with Feng Shui when I'm trying to make my code look like a landscape painting when rotated 90 degrees or when printed in my boss's continuous feed printer.

Re:Slashdot (1)

snowful (1231472) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570578)

It's that rebellious attitude that is keeping you down. Work on it. You might try taking a shower, as well.

Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (5, Insightful)

ThomasHoward (925022) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570480)

Who cares about the pay, once you are earning above a certain amount, being happy with what you do is far more important than earning more money. programming sounds far more fun than managing things and people. Give me t-shirts and jeans, screw wearing shirts, ties, suits and overpriced uncomfortable stuff like that.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (5, Interesting)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570536)

Wow, a lot of that list was written by MBA jerks jealous over what IT staff does. I never thought of it that way before. It never bothered me in my jobs as "what" I was wearing. But as ThomasHoward says, "being happy with what you do is far more important than earning more money".

T-shirts and jeans!

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

Garridan (597129) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570704)

Best job I've had; I wore t-shirts, jeans with holes (sometimes more holes than jeans), and never wore shoes when the sun was out. Best paying, too -- life was grand in the dot-com bubble. Now I'm back in school, and I still don't wear shoes when I don't feel like it. I was happy then, and I'm happy now -- I've got less money now, but I enjoy what I do (math) more than I ever liked that web dev gig.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (5, Insightful)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570866)

Wow, a lot of that list was written by MBA jerks jealous over what IT staff does.

No, as an MBA jerk, I can assure you I have no jealousy of IT whatsoever.

That list was written by a hack journo with no intent to reflect anyone's real world attitudes and every intent of boosting ad impressions by getting it posted to Slashdot and Reddit.

It's a shallow swipe at some IT stereotypes, nothing more. It should be in some internet scrapheap, not the front page.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (5, Insightful)

jotok (728554) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570546)

That is a really good attitude to have. I, on the other hand, look really good in suits, and I like consulting more than I like programming. To each his own.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

neumayr (819083) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571010)

I [...] look really good in suits [...].
Who doesn't? They're made to make people look good...

Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (4, Interesting)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570638)

If being a respectably-paid techie means I can wear a Hawaiian shirt and shorts on a hot sticky summer day, I'll take that over some high-paid exec sweating bullets in his black suit when its 90+ degrees out. Hell, if it's 100+ I'll go Kilting because I can. That's the kind of freedom over stuffy board rooms and sweating suits, and plust the fact that I love the work I do I'll keep that "lower" position thankyouverymuch.

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570764)

So you'd rather be a geek than an exec because the mandatory underwear isn't appealing?

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570822)

Who says regimental is bad when your boss is dying of heat in his oven-suit?

Seriously though, fashion isn't the main reason I'd rather be a geek than an executive. I love working hands-on with projects, on a nitty gritty level you can only get by being a techie. That's the kind of work I perfer, and I just don't see that kind of thing in management.

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (1)

Bartab (233395) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570792)

Suggestion: Use air conditioning.

The universe won't noticeably survive entropy any longer if you avoid being comfortable.

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (5, Insightful)

Angostura (703910) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571116)

That's right. Why adjust the dress code slightly when you can install expensive refrigeration and hike up the energy bills.

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570960)

So, uh, "Bananatree," you like to wear kilts to work and keep your "lower" positioned? There's a reason people don't want you above them on the corporate ladder. Especially on a windy day.

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (1)

carpe_noctem (457178) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571036)

If being a respectably-paid techie means I can wear a Hawaiian shirt and shorts on a hot sticky summer day

I assume on said days, you just wear your sandals without socks?

Re:Stuffed Shirts and Suits in summer (2, Funny)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571120)

Isn't that why they made sandals in the first place? Yes, without socks.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

Rakishi (759894) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570686)

Everyone is different, why do people seem to never realize this. Personally I like thinking and coming up with ideas, programing is amusing to me but gets really boring after a while.

That aside, to me money is security and time. I can pay someone else to do things I don't enjoy doing and if the shit hits the fan I have something to rely on. To be honest the later is much more important, society does not care about the little guy and I have no desire to be stepped on.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

YttriumOxide (837412) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570740)

Personally I like thinking and coming up with ideas, programing is amusing to me but gets really boring after a while.
And that's why I do both... I get requests for the general outline of a project, but the main design decisions are up to me, and I write all the code. I honestly can't imagine a MORE creative job than mine, and I love it. (and I haven't worn a tie since I started this job, and couldn't care less whether my shoes and belt match). Plus it's higher paying than the management position that I turned down before I was offered this job!

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (5, Interesting)

tgd (2822) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570714)

The difference between t-shirts and jeans and suits and ties is one of corporate culture, not management vs grunt.

That sort of elitist thinking ("programming sounds far more fun than managing things and people") is part of the culture that keeps IT and engineering staff out of decision making positions. You're looking at the business from your perpective and yours only, and announcing it to everyone.

Building a business, building a team, management -- they're all forms of creative problem solving every bit as "fun" or creative as programming is. In fact, imaging programming for a CPU whose instructions have unpredictable execution speeds and results.

Management isn't generally a bunch of PHB's who flail around with no idea what they're doing. Just as there are good engineers and bad engineers, the same is true of people who build and run businesses, but good or bad they're doing the same thing you're doing -- they're engineering teams or a business just as you are engineering classes or applications.

Recognizing that will get you a long ways towards getting into the sort of position in a company where you can do what you find fun *and* have the influence needed to ensure decisions that impact areas of your responsibility are made correctly. Ignoring it will leave you forever being the monkey who has to jump when asked.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (3, Insightful)

uberchicken (121048) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570892)

One of the most interesting posts I ever read. You made me think about my attitudes.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570980)

Sure, but when you're the monkey with all the knowledge, you get asked very politely.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (4, Insightful)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570982)

In fact, imaging programming for a CPU whose instructions have unpredictable execution speeds and results.

Then it wouldn't be programming anymore, it would be guessing. Sure, you can make best guesses, but that's it. Management is trying to make "best guesses" so that the company will flourish.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (4, Interesting)

aug24 (38229) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571070)

Speaking as a contractor who has worked in dozens of companies, led and built teams and generally blurred the line between geek and management, I would say that:

Management isn't generally a bunch of PHB's who flail around with no idea what they're doing.

is basically wrong. Generally they are exactly that.

Maybe not in a bricks and mortar business, but in IT that's pretty much exactly what they are. IMHO, of course.

Cheers,
Justin

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

Angostura (703910) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571128)

Darwinian management would suggest that if that were the case, then those businesses would have been outcompeted financially long ago by the businesses run by geeks.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22571104)

Building a business, building a team, management -- they're all forms of creative problem solving every bit as "fun" or creative as programming is. In fact, imaging programming for a CPU whose instructions have unpredictable execution speeds and results.

You mean like programming for previous versions of Windows, with no memory protection or anything, where even thinking about opening paintbrush and notepad at the same time would make the system hehave *unpredictably*? Forget it.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22571134)

I suspect the reason geeks assume all management are PHBs is that the competent bosses end up getting promoted, whereas the idiots are left at a lower level where geeks have to work with them everyday.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (2, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570772)

Everything else aside, earning more money has some serious advantages. Early retirement, better vacations, and being able to ride out a depression with some help from your savings are all things that more money helps. Add a wife and family into the mix and more money's a verifiably good thing. I'm not saying that you should have that same opinion, but for me, I'd take the peace of mind that comes from more money over day-to-day happiness.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (4, Insightful)

houghi (78078) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570798)

I have done both and unless you are an asshole pointy haired boss, being a manager can be very satisfying. You can not only hack at the code, but also steer the company in a direction that you think is good.

e.g. you can start using the OS and/or programs you think (and know from experience) are better for the company in the mid and long term.

Instead of you just doing your one job, you can achieve more then just what one person can do. You can motivate people to do it. You can do much more that way.

Imagine that they would 'just' be coding. No, there is nothing shamefull in being a manager. There is something wrong of being an asshole, but they do not need to go together. I have worked for assholes who were not managers and managers who were not assholes.

Also a suit is not uncomfortable and the fact that they are overpriced depends on where you buy them. Obviously, if you only want to wear t-shirts to every ocasion, including your wedding, then you will not be managament material anyway.

The fact that you think your dresscode is more importand then the job you do, means you are not interested in people. Hence: not management material.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

MBC1977 (978793) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570864)

"...being happy with what you do is far more important than earning more money." And this is the mindset which keeps most programmers and engineers out of the board room. You care about being happy doing what you do. They care more about the money -- and for some of them they are happy when chasing that big paycheck. As always, it pays to keep life in perspective, you will accomplish as much (or as little) as you choose to.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (5, Funny)

Simon Brooke (45012) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570916)

Who cares about the pay, once you are earning above a certain amount, being happy with what you do is far more important than earning more money. programming sounds far more fun than managing things and people. Give me t-shirts and jeans, screw wearing shirts, ties, suits and overpriced uncomfortable stuff like that.

H'mmm... Having been either a technical director or managing director of IT companies for fifteen years, I'm back being just a software engineer. Why? Mostly because I enjoy it more. But I'm sitting here at my desk about to start work, with my long hair and my beard and wearing a cycling jersey. Idiocy about corporate uniform makes me tired; it's just so old. If you don't enjoy what you're doing, stop now. If you don't feel comfortable in what you're wearing, wear something different. Life is too short, and money is frankly just not worth it.

But as a quick aside, the business suit is worn these days by lawyers, politicians, salesmen and the financial services industry - in other words, it's the uniform of the professionally dishonest. Is that really how you want people to see you?

Don't let them in on the secret (2, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571062)

You gave it away! (as another ex technical director and general manager now back doing systems development). If _everybody_ goes back to doing useful work, projects will get finished on time and the whole basis of the industry will collapse.

Seriously, why is it that if an artist dresses like a tramp and snarls at anyone who tries to distract him (or her) while working, that's just how talent operates, but when it's engineers or programmers, that just shows how dysfunctional they are? I think Toby Young had a handle on it in an article last weekend. "Management types" are often not too bright, therefore they want people to perceive factors other than intelligence as important in the workplace. You can be as thick as two bricks, but given enough money you can wear expensive suits and haircuts and drive a Porsche. So hey, suits and haircuts and expensive cars are evidence of managerial talent. Of course, you can have all those things and be a good manager, but the correlation, to my mind, does not imply causation.

Re:Why would I even want to be in the Boardroom (1)

priandoyo (1247048) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570922)

Who cares about the pay? your family? wife or children maybe? such dependent sometimes more substantial to your 'happiness life' Anjar Priandoyo http://securityprocedure.com/ [securityprocedure.com]

Re: Makes no difference anyway... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570944)

I've never been guilty of any of those...and I'm still just a code monkey after 32 years of experience programming! What you wear does not have as much bearing on getting into the boardroom as having an MBA does. I think I would prefer suicide over being surrounded by the scumbags and morons in business school.

Who's been following me around? (2, Interesting)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570492)

I am embarrassed to say a couple of those got me - but since I work at a university, it's pretty obvious I gave up on the corporate ladder long ago...

But seriously - do corporate IT folks really wear ties at all? Or is it just the managers (the "I like to pretend I'm a tech guy, but really I'm clueless" folks)?

Re:Who's been following me around? (4, Insightful)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570656)

I've seen both: ties are a safety hazard if you have to put your head inside server racks or do lifting to get equipment into the right place. But they're a dress standard in many corporate cultures, just as a tidy desk is. Like doctors wearing scrubs in the hospital, they identify you as professional staff rather than as service staff, even though we often are service staff.

Well yes. And no. (5, Interesting)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570826)

First of, wearing a tie or not has nothing to do with your actual competence. Neither is all of IT about tech. Corporate IT is far more then "just" the programmers and the managers. Some of the best people I have met over the years were not all that hot on the tech site but still good IT workers because they could bridge the gaps between the tech guys and the customer.

I am a bit suspicious of either extreme when it comes to dress code. Some people just don't fit in suits (I am one of them) while others only competence is to look good in one. I had this situation years ago when I worked for a small company and didn't have my driving license. I would be sent to the customer with a guy who drove me, that was really all he was good for IT wise, he just didn't have a clue, but he sure did look good in a suit. It was pretty common for us to arrive at the customer and for them to mistake him as the "boss" and me as the helper. I couldn't blame them but it did proof to me that people look at the tie first, competence second (if you are lucky).

However those cases were ALWAYS when the good looking people had screwed up and I had to come in to clean up, so this helped to make me acceptablebecause by this time the bosses were screaming and most bosses are rather down to earth and don't give a shit what the person who shovels the shit away looks like just as long as he is fast. But that doesn't make it any easier to get hired in the first place or to get the "easy" projects, we had a number of customers were I would only go under escort by sales because they had to provide a shield as it were of being dressed right to keep up appearances. A large customer dealing with real estate was one of them, everyone was in suits there, I looked like I was coming to pick up the trash, so thinking back to it we sorta send in the sales guy first to blind them with his outfit so I could do the tech work. For a lot of corporate IT SELLING your tech skills by putting it in a nice package is just as important as having the skills in the first place.

If you are detached somewhere where a full suit and tie is the regular dresscode they are going to have to be sold on your expensive contract by someone they can relate too. If you are REALLY good then a competent sales guy can sell your sandals but you better be REALLY good and you have to accept that for jobs were a really good guy ain't needed, they prefer to sell the guy who is easier on the eyes.

Mind you, there some far nastier versions of this. Females whose skills are sold disguised behind a male because tech guys can't possibly have tits. Don't even get me started on race issues.

Looks matter in the business world where everyone is always trying to sell you something. Goverment and education are different, goverment typically is run by people who just stuck with it for decades and education is were everyone who is to weird ends up, but in "business" it is everyone for themselves and you constantly have to sell yourselve.

So do you have to wear a tie? Well it all depends on what role you have. When you are coding at home or your own office, who cares. When you go to implement it, well, it isn't very comfortable. At the launch party? People should know how good you are by now. But when it is time to sell yourselve, then yes, it is just polite to dress up a bit. In sales, you dress up and if you are unlucky enough to have to be part of the selling of your skills, then looking right helps. A good IT company will help the hopeless with that. I simply arranged at one company that they dressed the worsed offenders of us. Because while going in jeans and a t-shirt is bad, it is even worse if you force these guys to buy a suit because they will screw it up. Send them out shopping at a good store that helps them pick the right outfit and have the company pay for it, keep it at the office and let the secretary handle keeping it clean. Let the people with a clue to dresscode handle the dressing, it might sound childish but it does work and offcourse in plenty of other industries it is perfectly normal to let the employer handle special clothing needs.

So no, you don't need to wear a tie in business IT but only if you are not involved in the sales end. As for the financial results, it is easier to get the high pay check if you can dress right. Sad but true, actuall skill is harder to get rewarded for then good looks.

But that don't mean it is impossible, just harder. Offcourse you also got to be brutally honest with yourselve, just how good are you AND just how good do you have to be for most jobs anyway? I tend to work on crisis projects, but ideally most IT projects should be pretty easy to implement. That good looking guy who drove me around WAS good at installing new PC's and such at customers, easy jobs but you had to wonder at times what made more money, 10 easily installed PC's or 1 crisis management of a server on a support contract.

But I have had occasions were my own report was ignored or heavily questioned until it was delivered by someone in sales who didn't know what any of it meant but he did deliver it in a tie. If you are lucky you find a job were contact with the kind of people who only listen to other suits can be limited, but life isn't always perfect. Keep a set of neat clothes around and dressup, just be sure to add it to the eventual bill.

How did this make slashdot? (1)

228e2 (934443) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570494)

This is something for people just entering the workforce. Common sense stuff . . . c'mon now . . . .

Pigtails? (5, Funny)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570502)

The shocker in here was pigtails on women... I love pigtails on women!


Maybe that is the reason why. Schoolgirl outfits and pigtails go hand in hand. It may be sexist, I won't deny it, but women who do this probably remind the men too much of a strip club and they need all that concentration on how best to screw the consumer :)

Let's not even touch men with pigtails either
 

Re:Pigtails? (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570570)

"They need all that concentration on how best to screw the consumer :)"

I thought most of these women try to concentrate on other things when doing that, otherwise it's just too unpleasant for them ;).

Yeah I know I know...

Re:Pigtails? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570572)

This one needs a visual aid

http://www.popamericana.com/!/pigtails.jpg [popamericana.com]

there ya go

Re:Pigtails? (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570724)

Best... Visual.... Aid.... EVER

Re:Pigtails? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570606)

> Let's not even touch men with pigtails either

Better not! Can you spell "sexual harassment lawsuit galore"?

Re:Pigtails? (5, Funny)

doofusclam (528746) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570614)

My girlfriend looks great in pigtails, it takes 10 years off her age too.

Trouble is she's only 22...

Re:Pigtails? (5, Funny)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570750)

Dear Diary,

Jackpot.

Re:Pigtails? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570840)

Pics please

Re:Pigtails? (1)

sykopomp (1133507) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571102)

How is that a problem? My girlfriend does this also, and I have absolutely no problem with it...

Pics please? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570516)

/r/ pictures of women in pigtails

I'll start [payserve.com]

Honestly, (5, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570522)

I thought the title said Bedroom for like 2 minutes.

Considering that the board room (4, Insightful)

Travoltus (110240) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570532)

is a major cause of slow-downs in innovation, one has to wonder if we're not looking at the problem in reverse.

Re:Considering that the board room (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570790)

is a major cause of slow-downs in innovation, one has to wonder if we're not looking at the problem in reverse.
The board room is also a major cause of breast cancer and autism.
Oh, I'm sorry, did I just make broad & unsupported claims?

The board of directors is ostentiably there to provide guidance and oversite to the management. We can provide good and bad examples & counter-examples till we turn blue in the face, but unless you can support your assertion with a line of reasoning, there is nothing +1 interesting about your comment.

aaargh! My eyes! (0, Flamebait)

conares (1045290) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570558)

+1 annoying web page

Real lesson (4, Insightful)

wanax (46819) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570562)

People base a hell of a lot on first impressions.. Although in theory this isn't the best approach, unless we have a new enlightenment one would be wise to "overdress", always.

Re:Real lesson (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570828)

Well, I hire people. And I have conditioned myself not to be influenced by first impressions (but, I admit, I may be in the minority). Additionally, if I were going for a job (which I am not, I have one and am very comfortable), I'd dress how I like. Sure, you might get plenty of knock-backs... but I don't want to work for people like that anyway. My personal view is "dress for the occasion" and to a level you're comfortable with. If you "overdress" you feel awkward, and this will probably manifest itself by you appearing, well... awkward and unsure. Just my 2 cents.

Re:Real lesson (1)

elh_inny (557966) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571044)

Well, I hire people. And I have conditioned myself not to be influenced by first impressions
How on earth do you decide if people that you hire are good or not?
Do you get more than one interview?
Is that hour or hour and a half not a first impression?
Or do you just hire anyone?

In any of the above cases it seems like a waste of time and money.

Re:Real lesson (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22571050)

I'm 22 years old, have no degree, never went to highschool, went to community college half-time for one quarter, have been working just under two years, and I wear a t-shirt and shorts to work every day, year-round, in the SF Bay Area.

I currently currently make US$80,000/year. At the rate things are going, I'll probably hit 100k in 2-3 years. I clean up and/or prevent operational disasters instigated by people with BS-or-higher degrees, frequently from places like CMU, UC Berkeley, Stanford, assorted Ivy League institutions, etc. who dress in polo shirts and blue jeans at an absolute minimum, and quite commonly suits and ties.

Absolutely no one is under the delusion that my clothes have anything to do with whether they should listen to me or how much they should pay me, so you'll have to excuse me for not seeing the wisdom or necessity of wearing hot, itchy, and generally uncomfortable clothes.

Slideshow (3, Informative)

Shadow-isoHunt (1014539) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570564)

Why the hell did you link to a slideshow? That site's slow as hell for me(rest of the net's fine), and the images weren't even loaded by the time it decided it was time to switch slides. The net isn't meant to be like a powerpoint presentation. Worse was the fact that adblock caught the "pause" button.

Re:Slideshow (1, Funny)

butlerdi (705651) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570672)

This must be one of the most obnoxious sites I have been linked ionto in a very long time. .....

Re:Slideshow (1)

Shadow-isoHunt (1014539) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571106)

You mean /.?

32kbps and counting (1)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571060)

> and the images weren't even loaded by the time it decided it was time to switch slides

there were images?

the answer (4, Funny)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570566)

I have the answer! You can't get into the board room because you're too busy fixing the CEO's computer that he broke again while he's in the meeting. I think we all know that's the real reason.

But I Don't Want To Be In The Boardroom (5, Insightful)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570582)

I know this is supposed to be a humourous article but I get really annoyed at these "business types" who consider anyone who isn't aiming for a 6/7 figure salary or who isn't treading on all of their work colleagues in order to reach the top, to be somehow abnormal - or even worse, demotivated or lazy.

I'm in my mid-40s here in the UK, I've been a techie in telecoms and security for 25+ years now, I'm now a consultant earning a good salary as does my wife. Admittedly we've no kids but we've got our own home as well as two holiday homes overseas (not time-shares, fully ours) and I couldn't want for a better life. I work a 37.5 hour week and at 5:30pm I can pretty much forget about work until the following morning, but whilst I'm at work, I do work hard.

So quite frankly, you can stuff your boardroom job, flashy cars, Armani suits, the endless travelling and hotel rooms, and the sixteen hour days because I'm not interested. I earn enough to live very comfortably provided that I'm careful but my life of "three thirds" is going great - one third work, one third sleep and one third pleasure...

Re:But I Don't Want To Be In The Boardroom (4, Insightful)

jfb3 (25523) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570660)

See, that's the difference between you and them. You think this article was meant to be humorous. They don't.

Re:But I Don't Want To Be In The Boardroom (2, Interesting)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570732)

Without the anger, I agree with you. You and I can also avoid the "Peter Principle" by refusing to be promoted beyond our level of competence, and not worrying if some younger person who couldn't shell script their way of file names with spaces in them winds up at the meeting that gets budget for your department.

The trick is to keep communications open with those managers, so that you help them get what they need to do their work (such as QA records, work records, and cooperation with silly corporate policies) and you get what they need (backup tapes, redundant power supplies, compensation time to sleep after doing the all-night server replacement, enough bandwidth for your corporate website, etc.)

Re:But I Don't Want To Be In The Boardroom (0, Troll)

houghi (78078) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570824)

jeez, lighten up. Were there any people putting a gun to your head and force you to be one of the board members. So you have other interests then other people. Great.

You could just have ended with the subject.

Re:But I Don't Want To Be In The Boardroom (1)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570958)

With all respect, Slashdot is essentially a discussion area.

And if people of differing opinions weren't here expressing their opinions, there wouldn't be much by way of discussion here, now would there?

And the whole point of my original posting was that there are a lot of people like me (I believe) who have not risen through the ranks of their company or have no particular aspirations of huge salaries or promotions, yet consider themselves successful and live most definitely happy lives.

It's very easy for business leaders or social psychologists to pigeon-hole people into little boxes purely by the way they look or dress - but in reality, they should have utmost admiration for those people with enough self-confidence to not give a damn about what anyone else thinks and just get on and do what they feel like. (And before you ask, I'm clean shaven with short hair and dress standard business casual when I'm in my office, so I'm not one of those people.)

Boardroom Fashion is BS (2, Funny)

Mr. Lwanga (872401) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570584)

Everyone knows only the devil wears Prada.

What about stupid irritating sites? (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570586)

Seriously, I got through about three pages - each image took about 4 seconds to download on my 20Mbps broadband, before I gave up.

Oh damn (5, Funny)

Quato (132194) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570588)

I got excited.... I thought it read....
Gaffes That Keep IT Geeks From the Bedroom

I'm so lonely...

Re:Oh damn (4, Insightful)

sakusha (441986) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570632)

I got excited.... I thought it read....
Gaffes That Keep IT Geeks From the Bedroom

You might be right. Women don't go for guys who dress like slobs.

Re:Oh damn (1)

Quato (132194) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570968)

Informative? It's humor you lost causes.

Worst link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570602)

ever. Even for slashdot.

This is just another boring story about ... (3, Insightful)

Skapare (16644) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570608)

... people that think it's more important to judge people by their looks than by what they can contribute to the job. Sure, if the job is is to look pretty or whatever, then you better be able to do that well. But if the job is to make the database perform well, or keep the network secure, or debug the company application product, then those skills are how a person should be judged ... not on their T-shirt color, length of dread-locks, wearing of sandals even in winter, etc.

OK, bathing every day is good.

Choice of after hours sport might affect things, but it should only be because of who is at the same sporting place at the same time. One group might congregate at the golf course, while another is at the skating rink, and yet another is at the shooting range.

Re:This is just another boring story about ... (4, Insightful)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570730)

. people that think it's more important to judge people by their looks than by what they can contribute to the job...OK, bathing every day is good.
But then you're engaging in the same thing they are! The point of the matter is that you dress and act like you want people to see you. If you don't dress like someone who's going to impress the boss, then you're obviously not trying very hard to impress the boss.

Communication is the name of the game when it comes to management, and someone who can't communicate who they are through their clothing are probably going to have problems communicating in other ways. Is this the way it should be? Maybe not. But society is built upon judging people, and if you don't try to be judged favorably, don't bitch when you aren't.

Re:This is just another boring story about ... (1)

theglassishalf (216497) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570976)

And if you're running a company, and you are impressed by people go through superficial actions to try to impress you, then you are a fool, and your business will suffer.

Re:This is just another boring story about ... (1)

NNKK (218503) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571108)

In the end, I really don't give a damn whether my boss is impressed with me or not. That's not what I'm getting paid for. If they're not impressed by the fact that I do what I'm paid for, and do it well, that's their loss.

Re:This is just another boring story about ... (4, Insightful)

tirerim (1108567) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570762)

Well, it's great to know how people should be judged. Unfortunately, that's very rarely how they actually are judged... in part because the people doing the judging often don't even have the capability to assess the correct criteria. Knowing how to impress people with poor evaluative skills is still useful if you want to get somewhere in the real world. And those people aren't completely on crack, either -- they're doing something that we all do sometimes, using evidence from a known domain to give clues about the quality of an unknown domain. If you're buying a car, and you have a choice between one with a perfect exterior and one with a few rust holes in the body, you're probably going to pick the nice-looking one, even if they appear to run the same, because it's evidence that it was better treated, and the mechanical parts of the car are likely to last longer, too. Of course, you could be completely wrong, but you're still basing your decision on the evidence you have. For people, the reasoning is similar: someone who is careful in their appearance is also probably careful in their work.

Personally, I work for a nonprofit, mostly from home, so I don't have to worry about my appearance much. On the other hand, I also don't make much money; if I cared enough about money to work in industry, I certainly wouldn't ignore how I look.

The real gaffe (3, Funny)

lawrencebillson (1136239) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570624)

The real gaffe: getting your fashion advice from Slashdot...

presentation (4, Insightful)

radu.vatav (1031922) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570644)

The author of the linked article seems to know all about being a "board"-whatever, but isn't able to make a decent presentation (the page is updated too quick for me to read the text). Sort of fits together...

Re:presentation (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570938)

If the author of that linked article was such a high-up boardroom member, do you think s/he'd be making a living by writing articles and hoping they get submitted to slashdot?

Those who can, do.

Those who can't, teach.

Those who can't teach write about in magazines. Not much has changed since magazines started going digital.

Re:presentation (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 6 years ago | (#22571080)

The author of the linked article seems to know all about being a "board"-whatever, but isn't able to make a decent presentation (the page is updated too quick for me to read the text). Sort of fits together...
Maybe we should print a series of T-Shirts "Gaffes That Keep Superficial-Minded MBA's From The Web", including one-sentence-per-page websites, flash animations, powerpoint, ... and wear a different one each day... Should get the message across. We look like dweebs in the boardroom. They look like dweebs on the web.

inability to swollow bullshit and say nothing (3, Insightful)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570676)

Board memebers most precious ability is to talk and eat bullcrap straight faced. if a geek hears something he thinks is total crap, they aren't able to not say something. I know i can't, i just have to point out the flaws in a bad idea.

Been sitting here ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570700)

... for the best part of 8 years, in shorts and a t-shirt, with bare feet.

No travelling to work (unless you count climbing the stairs to the office), I can smoke, drink, eat pizza etc in my office ... and also put down some serious code as required.

Of course, I'm lucky, I work remotely ...

I TaHANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570702)

All right, perfect score! (1)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570748)

Oh wait, I think that's supposed to be bad. I guess that explains my pay scale.

Re:All right, perfect score! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22571068)

I wouldn't worry about it - I have an almost perfect score, and a salary 5 times the national average, without stepping on my cow-orkers and generally mixing business with pleasure. (of course this is because I am an information security geek, so the skills are in high demand right now, but I would probably do this job for way less money)

Newton dressed well... (1)

kylebarbour (1239920) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570760)

Just because you're well dressed doesn't mean you can't be a good scientist/coder. The old guys knew that...

http://www.gnxp.com/blog/2007/08/cleaning-up-your-nerdy-appearance.php [gnxp.com]

Aristocracy (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570784)

Newton was among the most public figures of his time, and was among the rich Aristocracy. That was his social class.

First Post@! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570804)

First post

No slide show version (4, Informative)

Derling Whirvish (636322) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570810)

Gaffes Keeping Geeks Out of the Board Room

1. Mismatching Shoes and Belt
2. Tie and Short Sleeve Shirt
3. The One Binary Watch
4. Tight Black Jeans
5. Oversized Hawaiian Shirts
6. Socks and Sandals
7. Alternative Hairstyles
8. Concert T-shirts
9. A Closet of Vendor and Trade Show Gear
10. Stains

It's really testament to the shallowness of the boardroom that these are actually taken seriously by those with the ability to promote people. Your plan for upgrading the servers using well-reasoned arguments backed with meticulous research data to save the company megamoney in maintenance well be passed over because they are concentrating on your mismatched belt and shoes instead. >sigh

Superficial crap (1, Insightful)

psykocrime (61037) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570842)

I'm sure all of the "tips" in that article are valid, if you work for a stodgy old company run by stodgy old people, or a company full of superficial twits who judge other people by superficial things like clothing. IF you work for a company like that, and IF you intend to continue to do so, AND you care about "climbing the corporate ladder" then sure, ditch your jeans, Iron Maiden t-shirts, Hawaiian shirts, sandals, etc.

On the other hands, you work for one of those kinds of companies, and if you don't care to be a sell-out ("to thine own self be true" and all that) then I suggest quitting and going to work somewhere populated with people who care about things that actually matter, like performance, cultural fit, work ethic, etc. Or, better yet, quit and start your own company.

"Those people" are dinosaurs and there time is passing anyway. Hopefully as the "Gen X" and "Gen Y" kids start to displace their predecessors in the business world, it'll represent an opportunity to inject some fresh thinking and new approaches to things. Life is too short to waste time worrying about what morons think about your belt and shoes.

Now excuse me while I go back to listening to Skid Row's "Youth Gone Wild." \m/
   

Really... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570876)

How utterly .... american.

Re:Really... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570904)

I would actually go for britan where you are forced to wear "proper" clothes like shirt and tie. In Sweden (or Soviet Russia!) co-workers will look strange upon you if you wear shirt and tie. I for one welcome our un-fashionable overlords.

Re:Really... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570970)

My thoughts exactly. The scandinavian company culture seems so very much more reasonable in this regard.

Sorry its where you went to school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22570894)

And how much your clothes cost, nothing more.

Not so much the appearance.. (2, Insightful)

gelshocker (512561) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570910)

But the communication and social skills (or lack of) from 'techies'. You're not gonna get invited to the table if they can't friggin understand what your bashing about.

Epileptics should not Read The Fine Article. (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570932)

Or at least they should turn off images before loading the page. (I'm only half-kidding.) This isn't a classic "dancing bears" website, it's a "the dancing bear reaches out and pokes you in the eyeball with a jagged claw every 3 seconds" web page.

It is literally painful to try to read the article's text within the images. Slowing down the reload to every 10 seconds would make it tolerable.

Ponytail (3, Funny)

rickwood (450707) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570956)

Alternative Hairstyle: Guilty. However, I think in my case the real reason has more to do with statements such as, "Greg, you would do well not to turn this into a matter of honor."

Although, "If you knew what you were doing, I wouldn't be here. Why don't you make yourself useful and go get me a cup of coffee. Black," probably runs a close second.

OBEY! (3, Interesting)

Richard Kirk (535523) | more than 6 years ago | (#22570962)

Yep: they tell us you can be in charge, but only if you conform and obey. And the person who is above you - he (yep, it is more likely to be a he) got there by conforming and obeying. And all they way up the chain the same rules apply. Except, the geek wonders, what happens at the top? Reduction ad absurdam, guys - who does the top person obey and conform to? Lord Xenu? Some Darth Vader guy who allows himself alone to wear the cool black cape, and everyone else has to wear the regulation grey? Som being of pure energy that is unable to support a tie, and yet can insist on it on others?

Actually, no. I have seen clothing standards spontaneously appear. A clean room was set up. The people who worked in it got to chose the colour of their clean room gowns and shoes. Noboday wanted the white. The people who worked in there went for the light blue. People like me who had occasional buisness there, and needed to use the electron microscope used the deep blue ones. We had white ones for visitors. After about a month, I found I was getting ticked off for wearing the wrong colour gown, even though the gowns didn't actually belong to anybody in particular.

The Scientific Civil Serivce in the UK used to start at jacket and tie, then go to light suits (meaning you didn't do anything too messy or chemical, and could go double jeopardy with matching trousers and jacket. The further up you went, the darker the suit got. However, I could not go and get a perfectly black suit and become King - the system enforced the dress, not the other way around. In the Foreign office things were the other way around - going from dark suites, via light suits, to jacket and trousers, perhaps implying you spent your time in Jakarta, Bejing, Hawaii, and Bongo-Bongo-land, and you are only popping through London. I bet the Queen would rather wear almost anything on her head other than the Regulation Shiny Hat that her office requires for one or two state occasions.

The ancient Romans thought the toga was silly and impractical, but it was traditional, and it was status. The tale of the 47 Ronin was all started by someone being advised to wear the wrong colour of trousers at court. Year yellow stockings cross-gartered at the knee, and you were a fool in Shakespere's day. Come the Revolution, we shall all be wearing Mao suits. if the fashionistas say silly long middle-ages shoes, or ruffs, or bustles, you jump, or you fall behind. Is there truly no escape?

Let me qualify that last cry: is there no escape, that also allows us power, influence, and a decent wage?

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