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Young Employees Pose Increasing Risk to Networks

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the also-increased-chance-of-lohan dept.

Security 710

buzzardsbay writes "Baseline is reporting on an upcoming survey from Symantec and Applied Research-West that confirms many suspicions about the generation gap in the workplace, namely that younger workers will use your corporate network to run most any device, technology or social networking software they can get their hands on. Dubbed "Millenials," these workers born after 1980 are nearly twice as likely to use cell phones and PDAs at work, and half admit to installing unauthorized software on their employer's computers. On the upside, the Millenials are more security aware than their older co-workers."

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710 comments

they need to protect their networks (5, Insightful)

k3v0 (592611) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773738)

isn't it the company's responsibility to control their network?

Re:they need to protect their networks (5, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773880)

Having a company adequately secure their network would cut into symantec's bottom line, so, from their perspective, no.

Re:they need to protect their networks (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774014)

Fuck the Chinese government! Free Tibet!

Re:they need to protect their networks (5, Insightful)

tattood (855883) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774180)

isn't it the company's responsibility to control their network?

It's also about educating the employees more than anything IT can do to protect the network. If I can call one of your employees and pretend to be the remote helpdesk, and say that I need your password so I can install some software on your computer, and they give me the password, I am in your network.

It's called social engineering, and if you are good at it, you can get past ANY network or software based systems.

Re:they need to protect their networks (5, Insightful)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774212)

And that's a great idea, until you end up with a piece of required software that refuses to run without local admin privileges on the computer...

What about the other half? (4, Insightful)

ccguy (1116865) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773742)

half admit to installing unauthorized software
I assume the other half:
- Do it but don't admit it
- Or don't it but are way less productive than their peers

I don't know how it is for the rest of the slashdot crowd but almost everywhere I've worked it's impossible to be (decently) productive using only authorized software.

The sad thing is not a matter of cost, but a matter of paperwork. Something as basic as winrar (no, let's not go into why would I want to use winanything) is impossible to get by the official channels.

Re:What about the other half? (4, Informative)

Smidge204 (605297) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773834)

Interesting how you say that "installing unauthorized software" = "more productive"

I'm willing to bet that the vast majority of "unauthorized software" are things like chat clients, media players, RSS/Weather update notifiers, games and software for personal devices (iTunes etc).
=Smidge=

Re:What about the other half? (4, Insightful)

Compholio (770966) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773890)

Firefox, SSH, VNC, .... Not to mention that a lot of tech support happens over IRC and IM.

Re:What about the other half? (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773916)

Where I work the first two (FireFox, SSH) are pre-installed and the third I haven't needed. Tech support happens over a dedicated phone number... useful if your computer can't get online :P

Re:What about the other half? (3, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774034)

Firefox: If places don't allow multiple browsers, thats their own fault. Just stupid.

VNC: If it's needed for the job, I'd have it installed, or some other similar remote management program...VNC isn't all that feature rich. You'd probably need NAT for that as well, and you ought to run it through a tunnel. Otherwise, I am the firewall gestapo. I open ports for no one, and if you try to local proxy all your traffic out through 80 I will notice.

SSH: See above, except for the tunnel part.

The worst type of user is the tech guy who doesn't work in IT. They always think they know better, they have a massive attitude, and a huge superiority complex. If you can prove to me you know your shit, I'll give you some leeway, but that leeway is probably just having your box dumped out into the DMZ, and you screw it up, you fix it.

Re:What about the other half? (5, Funny)

haystor (102186) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774166)

"They always think they know better, they have a massive attitude, and a huge superiority complex."

They?

Re:What about the other half? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774222)

The worst type of user is the tech guy who doesn't work in IT. They always think they know better, they have a massive attitude, and a huge superiority complex. If you can prove to me you know your shit, I'll give you some leeway, but that leeway is probably just having your box dumped out into the DMZ, and you screw it up, you fix it.

You're kidding, right? Who is the one with the massive attitude and huge superiority complex?

As the IT guy, it is your job to 'know your shit' and provide me with the tools I need to get my job done. If you know more than me, good for you. Unlike you, I don't really care whose dick is bigger. I just want to get my work done. Can we just get things done without the drama?

Re:What about the other half? (1)

techpawn (969834) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774256)

The worst type of user is the tech guy who doesn't work in IT. They always think they know better, they have a massive attitude, and a huge superiority complex.
Yes, the wizkids who think because they have XP Pro they are able to do anything....

No! Bad poweruser! No cookie! Best to show them why YOU'RE in IT and they are not. When they realize it's more than clicking the right buttons half the time and rebooting, they seem to calm down.

Re:What about the other half? (4, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774032)

You know, they were pretty darn accurate.

At my work, the things I install "unauthorized" for myself and my coworkers which are 100% productivity:

Firefox
Phrase Express (text macro program)
Stardock
Microsoft Powertools/toys (the one that gives you a screenshot of each app when you alt+tab).

None are "approved" but all the techs approve of it, because they know better.

None of them use any of what you mentioned. No RSS readers, no games, no funky screensavers, no weather spyware shit. Work is laid back enough to not care (many people just browse the web all day, I mean cmon I'm replying on slashdot), but most people don't push the slacking that far. Also, we're an enormous multibillion $ nonprofit corporation and what I am telling you is like...hmm, well its a worldwide company with thousands of employees. I've talked to the CEO and even he has admitted to having a preference for firefox over IE for example, even though the CIO hasn't officially or formally approved it.

I don't mean it to be ad hominem on this, but I will say you are making a pretty general bias here that is pretty generally not accurate.

Re:What about the other half? (1)

ccguy (1116865) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774054)

Interesting how you say that "installing unauthorized software" = "more productive"
Yes. The stuff you mention is usually installed by other kind of users, definitely not developers.
If you want we can also talk about having the same policy regarding installed/installed software, permissions, etc for everybody (from programmers to secretaries) is counterproductive.

Re:What about the other half? (1)

Smidge204 (605297) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774226)

What's the ratio of developers:non-developers for people who use computers at work?

I'm guessing comparatively small, given that computer stations are set up for just about every employee that has a dedicated space, even if it's just a countertop.
=Smidge=

Re:What about the other half? (3, Insightful)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774144)

and software for personal devices (iTunes etc).

I'm more productive when listening to music (blocks out outside noise). I've worked at places where my bosses have SUGGESTED that I get a pair of headphones and listen to music at work. If anything, iTunes should make an employee MORE productive by helping them get into the zone, and less prone to distractions.

The same thing applies to media players, assuming they're used for audio and not video. Anyone suggesting that such things makes employees less productive has obviously never worked for a software development company/department.

Re:What about the other half? (1)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774170)

But does that necessarily mean that the employees will be less productive? Take iTunes, for example. I, for one, work better while listening to music. It may be unauthorized and unproductive in and of itself, but for me it actually increases net productivity (something that my coworkers and employer quickly recognized, fortunately).

I understand the problem with people installing games, though. I hope for their sake that they use them only during their breaks or lunch.

Re:What about the other half? (5, Insightful)

digitig (1056110) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773856)

I assume the other half:
- Do it but don't admit it
- Or don't it but are way less productive than their peers

I don't know how it is for the rest of the slashdot crowd but almost everywhere I've worked it's impossible to be (decently) productive using only authorized software.
Quite. I remember being employed to do software development when there were no programming languages included in the approved software, because the people who drew up the approved software list had never bothered to ask the business areas what they did with their computers. I never did get any languages approved, but I did get them to lift my authorisation level so I could run executables that weren't on their heavily locked-down desktop, which was all it took. The company bought the C++ compiler I asked for, and I installed and used it -- unauthorised.

Re:What about the other half? (3, Insightful)

plague3106 (71849) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773870)

Why do you assume that? Never crossed your mind that the other half don't, but are just as productive (or more so)? Maybe the other half can learn to use the authorized software instead of being so tied to one particular program and can't be bothered to learn something new.

Re:What about the other half? (3, Funny)

ccguy (1116865) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774100)

Never crossed your mind that the other half don't, but are just as productive (or more so)?
No.

Maybe the other half can learn to use the authorized software instead of being so tied to one particular program and can't be bothered to learn something new.
OK OK, I'll give notepad another chance for my code editing, and I'm sure I can come up with two decent .bat script to launch the compiler and so on... More good ideas? Email them all to ccguysboss@gmail.com :-)

Re:What about the other half? (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773888)

I've done support for companies that wouldn't install a single thing on the box we were working on. But they would download and run processmon because it didn't technically install.

For companies with crazy policies like that, I recommend Portable Apps [portableapps.com]

I'm surprised how high the risk is anyway (2, Informative)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773758)

only 25% of pre-1980 employees install rogue software on corporate PCs compared to 46% post 1980. If that happened in the bank I worked for there would be hell to pay!

Re:I'm surprised how high the risk is anyway (2, Funny)

revlayle (964221) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773912)

can you pay hell via a wire transfer?

Re:I'm surprised how high the risk is anyway (5, Funny)

Naosuke (662973) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774076)

Of course you can, their routing number is 666, but you still run into the problem of getting the account number of whoever you are sending the money to. Also the dollar is incredibly weak against souls right now, so it's pretty expensive.

Contradiction? (4, Interesting)

eggman9713 (714915) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773762)

They pose a greater risk because of unauthorized software, yet they are more security aware. Am I missing something that would otherwise make this sensical?

Funny that (5, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773766)

Most people born after 1980 are treated like shit in the IT industry. You are taken on for pitiful wages with vague promises of future riches, squeezed for every bit of knowledge you have, then booted out when the project(s) you are working on are finished. So it is hardly surprising that people treated so shabbily don't have a particular commitment to their workplace.

Most of the highly technical and well paid jobs (system admins and the like) seem to be already taken by well established old folk, and nobody is really interested in training anybody for when they retire. Managers take IT systems completely for granted, consider IT professionals to be lowly peons, and are in for a nasty shock when the handful of people keeping their systems running leave.

Re:Funny that (5, Funny)

pastpolls (585509) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773846)

You sound bitter that you have to start at the bottom like everyone else. Then again, maybe that is the problem some of us have with your generation.

Re:Funny that (1)

boris111 (837756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773918)

Yeah so and you could get a programming job in the 60's and 70's from trade school. Oh and the wages were a lot more back in those days compared to now. Tenure should only go so far without keeping your technical knowledge sharp. It's been a problem at my workplace.

Re:Funny that (1)

Rakishi (759894) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774002)

From what I heard older workers in the US simply get fired and then can't find a job because they'd need to be paid too much (cheaper to get a fresh college grad or two). As for getting paid more, welcome to how bloody reality works. The market changes and salaries change, adapt or die. If you don't like it then find a different profession or a niche that does pay well, that's how capitalism works.

Re:Funny that (4, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773926)

Fine, fine, I'll get off your lawn.

The myth that young people are spoilt and have an undue sense of entitlement is starting to wear a bit fucking thin though. In what way do we have more than previous generations? Tax burdens have been moved down to lower incomes in the UK, and I believe this is also the case in the US. Public services have been gutted by privatisation. Yet because we can buy iPods these days apparently we are spoilt. Fuck you. I'd rather be able to find an NHS dentist and get free higher education than have an mp3 player. Of course, now all you old fucks have no more need of public education and have fat wage packets to pay for private healthcare, you want such things scrapped so you don't have to pay for them. That is called 'kicking away the ladder'. Then you have the fucking nerve to complain about an undue sense of entitlement in the younger generation. You simply don't want to pay now for the things you were given to help you out when you were young.

Yeah, I'm bitter. I was treated like crap and told to suck it up and that I was spoilt by a generation that had it a fuck load easier than I did. That is why I turned my back on the entire industry, although I don't hold out much chance of getting away from selfish middle-aged wankers any time soon.

Re:Funny that (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773994)

Perhaps, just perhaps, English society is wising up to the fact that it cannot afford the cradle-to-grave entitlements that your parents got. Suck it up, bitch.

Re:Funny that (2, Interesting)

damburger (981828) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774028)

No, its selling these things off to make a profit for the already rich. We can afford them, contrary to the propaganda that you have clearly bought into hook line and sinker - its simply that the rich would rather have the money required for themselves and let us suffer. Stop reading the Daily Mail and pay attention to reality.

Re:Funny that (0, Redundant)

pastpolls (585509) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774026)

What makes you so special that you deserve free higher education and free dental? What was free when I was younger. I am still paying for Dental, I STILL have over $50k in student loans, and I am still paying higher taxes than you. You are furthering the stereotype.

Re:Funny that (2, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774078)

I'm in a different country - try to keep up grandad. I have £15,000 of debt that someone graduating even 10 years ago would not have (they would've received a grant rather than a loan). I cannot find an NHS dentist, whilst 10 years ago it was fairly easy. People in my country have less these days, yet we are told the young are spoilt. From the Americans I know the story there isn't quite the same, but it is similar - it was easier in the past to get off the bottom rung, and now the people who have done that are gleefully demanding it be made harder in order for themselves to pay less tax.

And you wonder why young people don't give a shit about your workplaces.

Re:Funny that (2, Insightful)

fredrated (639554) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774154)

I went to UC Berkeley in the 60's: $100 a quarter books not included.
It is considerably more today, a shame of the baby boom generation.

Re:Funny that (1)

Rakishi (759894) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774070)

Tax burdens have been moved down to lower incomes in the UK, and I believe this is also the case in the US.
I think it may be the opposite in the US, more financial aid and such stuff for lower income people (ie: you can be poor, go to a top grade university and not spend 10 years paying it off).

Of course, now all you old fucks have no more need of public education and have fat wage packets to pay for private healthcare, you want such things scrapped so you don't have to pay for them.
Interesting, in the US the push is for government sponsored health care and in K-12 for private (but government sponsored) schools. Granted the education system has always been a bloody mess here so it's not exactly a bad idea.

Re:Funny that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774184)

Check the mirror.

But, I've got good news. It would seem that you have a bright future in the take away food industry. You'll need to practice; 'Do you want chips with that, Governor?'

P.S. The Captcha for this post is "superior". Even Slashdot thinks you're a knob.

Re:Funny that (-1, Flamebait)

damburger (981828) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774198)

Actually I went back to university to do a Physics degree. As part of this I am a critical member of a team making what will (probably) be the first university designed satellite in the UK. So suck my balls.

fuck load easier? was:Re:Funny that (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774204)

a generation that had it a fuck load easier than I did

OK, you seem to be telling us you are in the UK, and you are under 30. That means that the previous generation for you would be people who are approximately 50-60, yes?

Being as that would be the first post-war generation, I'm not sure how you could get off saying they had it "a fuck load easier" than you in the UK. In case you have already forgotten, the UK had the fuck pretty well bombed out of it in WWII. The first post-war generation had to take part in the rebuilding of the country, and playing catch-up with the nations that were fortunate enough to not have lost the bulk of their infrastructure to the luftwaffe.

Your generation, on the other hand, has now that new infrastructure available. You are able to go to school and pursue whatever study you want. Nobody expects you to help bring your country around, because its doing pretty damned well now.

Yep, that certainly equates to the previous generation having had it a fuck load easier, doesn't it?

Re:fuck load easier? was:Re:Funny that (1, Flamebait)

damburger (981828) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774274)

I'm not going to give a great deal of credit to someone who can't subtract 60 from 2008. Someone who is 60 now was 5 years old when rationing ended in this country. They would've gone to university in 1966, by which time the UK had certainly recovered from Nazi bombing and they would've enjoyed free higher education in a variety of universities.

You are able to go to school and pursue whatever study you want.

This shows a profound ignorance of the subject at hand - the cost of going to university has been constantly increasing for as long as I can remember.

Nobody expects you to help bring your country around, because its doing pretty damned well now.

Except we are expected to sacrifice for our country. Pay for military adventures instead of health and education, suffer constant losses of liberty that affect the young and poor far more than the Daily Mail brigade. You don't have a clue about what is going on in the UK right now.

Re:Funny that (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774220)

Of course, now all you old fucks have no more need of public education ... You simply don't want to pay now for the things you were given to help you out when you were young. ...I don't hold out much chance of getting away from selfish middle-aged wankers any time soon.

Yawn. I worked my way through college with several jobs. No one gave me anything. I started at the bottom, and now have 20+ years of SA and programming experience on everything from Crays to PCs. Sure I now make really good money and set my own hours, but I EARNED it.

So, suck it up and write back when you have some actual, useful experience instead of being a whiny young brat who wants the brass ring NOW 'cause you took a class and have "skilz".

[ Sorry, I'm always bitchy on Monday. ]

Re:Funny that (2, Informative)

Compholio (770966) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773932)

Sounded to me like he was pissed that there was no chance for promotion since young people get let go when their project is complete. That's not "starting at the bottom", that's "temporary slave".

Re:Funny that (1)

pdusen (1146399) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773974)

You sound unwilling to consider that you or anyone your age might be mistreating, overworking, or underpaying anyone working under you. You seem to be hiding behind this illusion that your whole generation is benevolent and infallible. Then again, maybe that is the problem some of us have with your generation.

Re:Funny that (1)

Babillon (928171) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774254)

Some of the stuff he says has nothing to do with starting at the bottom and a lot to do with the fact that companies in the IT industry think they can jerk around new people because there's a good deal of them.

I live in a city where someone who dropped out of highschool and got their GED can make more than someone with a Computer Science degree. How's that for screwed up?

It's wrong when a tech job that requires a diploma of some sort still doesn't pay enough to bring your income up above the poverty line.

Re:Funny that (1)

chrishillman (852550) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773882)

I was going to say that what you describe was a previous experience of mine, but no longer the case..
but upon looking at your memberID number and mine, maybe I am one of those old folk you mentioned.

I hate feeling old.
By the way... get off my lawn!

Re:Funny that (4, Insightful)

3waygeek (58990) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774066)

Most people born after 1980 are treated like shit in the IT industry.
So are most people born before 1980.

Re:Funny that (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774150)

'Managers ..., consider IT professionals to be lowly peons, ...'

Definately not true; managers just believe that IT professionals should be treated like lowly peons.

Re:Funny that (1)

postbigbang (761081) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774248)

.... treated so shabbily.....

There are two sides of that coin. A previous generation had to pay heavy dues to get where they were. Sure, some of them screwed it up. Others layed the groundwork for your cushy gig. If you can't get into commitment, and do your best, you won't go anywhere. If greed is the only thing that motivates you, you're lost already.

You can get my gig. It pays well. And you'll have to work your ass off to get it and hold onto it. I believe in new recruits into IT. Some of them are brilliant, and many are very good. Some are motivated, and others are not. I'll pick a motivated recruit over someone that wants it on a platter in a heartbeat. Take your pity party someplace else.

Two Cents (3, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773768)

disclaimer: I am a "millenial", whatever the hell that means ;)

From the second slide: It's irritatingly true that many millenials can't pry themselves from their damn phones. Nobody should allow their phones to ring in class or during a date -- unless they're dope dealers, pimps, doctors, or on-call IT staff. That's why I prefer the company of mature women: they say a lot less, but what they say actually counts!

From the fourth slide: Not at all surprised to see that 59 % of "millenial" workers think they can install whatever they want, given that more of them are spoiled gimme-gimmes...but to be fair, I'll bet that older people are far more adept at trashing their home computers than millenials are at trashing any computer. How many times have you all had to reinstall your grandpappy's mangled, crapware-infested OS(which shall remain nameless...*wink*)?

From the tenth slide: how does better access to technology improve work/life balance? Does it enable workaholics to work from home during their offtime? Does it enable employees to feel "home" while fuckin' off on Myspace at work? I doubt that a significant percentage of those sampled were full-time telecommuters who truly felt a better work-life balance(read: they weren't "encouraged" to put in mass overtime just because they worked from home).

Stop this damnable generation reassignment. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773770)

Is there any damned way we could stop reassigning people to other generations.

kthxbye.

And also get off my damned lawn.

Re:Stop this damnable generation reassignment. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774042)

Is there any damned way we could stop reassigning people to other generations. ...no.

P.S: You're supposed to end a damned question with a damned question mark, not a damned period. Now go back to school, sonny, and learn some damned grammar.

Riight (1)

Lyrael (1196443) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773772)

as part of this younger generation I dunno about PDA's or unauthorised software but I do know I spend more time on /. than I do working...

OTOH, my colleagues around the same age as me most likely don't even know what a PDA is, and installing software of any kind themselves? Out of the question.

Security aware? (2, Interesting)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773778)

On the upside, the Millenials are more security aware than their older co-workers."
Security aware? Security aware, my ass. Half of these kids think it's okay to deploy their own, separate Internet proxy -- running on a desktop PC running Windows Server with no security patches and running M$ Proxy Server -- with an open wireless access point running on it. And then, not tell anyone about it!

Pffft.

No, I'm not making this up. This really happened one place I worked.

Re:Security aware? (1)

pdusen (1146399) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774016)

I didn't realize a single one of "these kids" that you worked with was half of "these kids". He must be a pretty big "these kids".

I thought we called these guys "gen y"? (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773792)

Dubbed "Millenials," these workers born after 1980...


I thought we called these guys "gen y"?

Re:I thought we called these guys "gen y"? (1)

kaptain80 (1147495) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774158)

In these discussions, there seems to be two boxes of people: (1) people born before 1980 (Gen X, etc.); (2) people born after 1980 (Gen Y, etc.) I'm curious about what my place is, since I was born in 1980, not before or after... I shall dub us: the singularity.

Millenials. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773818)

Just for that, I'm not going to read the story.

Not much to this story (5, Insightful)

comet63 (1256400) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773822)

Looks like the title is overblown. The younger works do slightly more risky things than the older workers. However, the older workers (Gen X in this case) still do all the same things, just a little less often. None of the numbers suggest a big change in risk. A lot of the risk factors being described just go from numbers like 47% to 51%. Hardly anything dramatic.
If you want to secure your network, you need to address all the risks that are out there. Adding a little more risky behavior does not really make for any real changes is the risks to the network. Networks are always at risk from the weakest link. A 60 year old employee who happens to do something risky is just as bad for the network as a 20 year old.

There are really two sides to this coin (2, Insightful)

jandrese (485) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773828)

On one side letting some random person install any old IRC client is just asking for the office machine to be owned eventually. On the other hand, I hate the idea of being a no good outlaw just because I want to use vim instead of notepad for text editing.

Ug. Terrible article. (3, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773838)

First off: Worst article ever. Not just one paragraph per page...1 statistic per page? Jesus. Content to page ratio is like .001:11. And what content there is is vapid and uninteresting.

If you're an admin tasked with security, you have to assume all users are evil, so the question should be more along the lines of, "What is the problem with your process that you are allowing these users to install unapproved software?" Symantec obviously has a big stake in convincing people that they need better security (assuming that this will drive business for their crappy products), but the simple truth is that these sorts of problems shouldn't BE problems in an adequately secured network...Even your basic windows AD setup on XP is capable of restricting software installs and such.

If you're a big believer in allowing users to install whatever crap that they think they need to do their jobs, then you'll need to invest in some solid networking gear because you're inevitably going to have more problems. Otherwise, just lock it down, set up an approval process, and be prepared to deal with a zillion complaints from people who think they're experts because they did their own myspace page.

Re:Ug. Terrible article. (2, Insightful)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774012)

The "article" was more like a Powerpoint presentation for retards. You're right, any sane security-minded company would lock their systems down. This usually isn't about approval of certain CAD or automated test software, it's about the damn internet and the gimme-gimmes wanting their fix because they can't go 8 hours without looking at some blinkenlights. Most companies I've seen are either totally locked down or totally open. A good compromise would be for a company to set up a common terminal(with internet access but preventing anything from being installed) in the break room with a 2-minute max for each person. It'd be trivial to set up, even by an MSCE ;)

And old People... (4, Insightful)

boris111 (837756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773842)

give their passwords on the phone to whoever asks. I've seen it happen. Security is an issue that effects us all. Shouldn't single out the young people on this one.

Re:And old People... (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774088)

Sometimes we have to do that to get work done. If one needs their own login credential to get work done, and the credential provider drags its feet, then sometimes one has to depend on others' passwords(with the other's consent, of course) to get stuff done.

Re:And old People... (1)

boris111 (837756) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774176)

It's one thing if it's in a trusted group of people. These people give their passwords to help desk people. How do they know it's not someone calling from the outside hacking the old fashioned way? They gave no challenge to the question or anything.

Fair Trade (5, Funny)

multisync (218450) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773852)

On the upside, the Millenials are more security aware than their older co-workers


They're also less likely to call IT with problems like "I'm trying to make an Internet on my desktop but I can't get the file to program."

Breaking News: (4, Funny)

jockeys (753885) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773860)

This just in... young people are more likely to use iPods and PDAs than old people. Film at 11.

Web IM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773866)

A lot of IM software have web-based implementations, and with gmail it's built-in. It's difficult to track them all down because there are third party implementations as well.

whew! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773868)

That was close! I was born in 1979.

And this is why. . . (2, Informative)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773872)

those who manage the networks and PCs get ticked off and impose what seem like draconian rules about installing software and locking people down. All that extra cruft takes its toll on network performance and consumes resources.

If you need a piece of software, yes, we will install it for you. You do not need the Gmail notifier constantly popping up and telling you you have new mail or checking for updates. Nor do you need to have Quicktime continually checking for updates. You most certainly do not need any kind of P2P software installed.

While it's nice these "new" people are more comfortable with technology, the downside is the proverbial, "Just enough knowledge to be dangerous".

how hard could it be? (1)

vajaradakini (1209944) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773898)

What kinds of unauthorized software are people using, exactly? If a company was actually concerned about people installing things on their office computers, couldn't they just keep the administrative privileges away from the employees and/or flag computers they catch using certain software?

I mean, on campus here they block any computer suspected of using peer to peer programs for two hours (which is annoying when you have skype which can get mistaken for a peer to peer program if you leave it running) and my supervisor hasn't given me sudo permission on my computer (although I'm trying to bug him for updates and whatever software in hopes that if I harass him enough he'll get annoyed and let me do it myself). It generally doesn't seem that hard to do.

Unauthorized software (4, Interesting)

wile_e_wonka (934864) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773906)

What exactly does "unauthorized software" mean?

My company doesn't give me administrator privilages, but has IE 5.5 installed. They haven't told me exactly what I can or can't do with my computer (except "you can browse the web in your down-time, but don't look at porn"), but I don't think the people that immediately oversee me know enough about computers to understand installing programs and stuff (really, it's pretty amazing--they don't even know that IE 5.5 is different at all from whatever they use at home).

The computer won't let my upgrade IE, so I installed Opera and Firefox. Is this "unauthorized software"?

Now, let's go a step more complicated.

They said I can browse the web in my downtime, right. So I figured I can also download and view MIT physics lectures (yes, Walter Lewin). My computer doesn't have proper codecs to view these videos. So I had to install codecs, but the computer is very resistant to that--it took a lot of trial and error to find a codec that would install and also play the videos.

Did the larger amount of work to avoid the problems associated with a lack of administrator privileges make this "unauthorized"?

I've also tweaked the registry (this is Windows 2000) because there were several programs starting with the computer that I have no use for. "Unauthorized"?

Re:Unauthorized software (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774022)

Two ways to look at it; Firstly, you could bound by a computer usage policy (most likely tied to your contract) for the company, in which case I bet it has some section about "downloading or bringing in executable programs" or some such, so most likely Firefox and Opera breach that. If IT is headed by a totalitarian knob-jockey, he'll kick up a stink because you're installing downloaded programs onto HIS computer.
 
Other way to look at it is you weren't PREVENTED from doing these things, and none of them (AFAI/YouK) were detrimental to the running of the network. In fact, some may have been beneficial. Either way, it's probably best to check with your manager first (as he never, ever wants to be left out of a decision regarding one of his working masses), and then the IT dept to let them know you're not some PHB who thinks that just because he can plug in a power lead without dribbling into it makes him competant.

Re:Unauthorized software (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774094)

In answer to your questions, yes, it's all unauthorized. I think your company is run by a bunch of goobers though.

Here we block most everything at the firewall. You can have whatever browser you want. We allow iTunes and similar. You need something else, let us know, and if there is a valid work reason for it, we allow it.

Any company that doesn't remove regedit or similar is asking for pain.

Install "unauthorized" software? (1)

Puls4r (724907) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773920)

Typical piece written by a suedo-IT guy.

IT thinks the world can get by with Microsoft office and nothing else. Need a graphics program to put a presentation together? Fat chance. Hell, just downloading and installing convert.exe is a "violation". MP3 player other that windows media? PDF converter? There are a hundred different applications that I need to use, and half the time I use them only once or twice. If I followed the "IT" rules, I'd fill out a form, wait a month, then get denied because the application isn't "business centric" or it doesn't "fit your company position". Even better is that they only support 1 type of PDA. So I use a notebook (paper) instead.

Perhaps the "IT" generation should start being a little more flexible and actually give folks the applications they need on a somewhat timely basis. That would go a long way towards helping. Where's the report saying that the IT folks are the worst offenders when it comes to network security when you need it?

Re:Install "unauthorized" software? (1)

jrmann1999 (217632) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774050)

Explain how windows media player isn't enough to play music? Oh, and don't forget to include the reason it increases your productivity and either makes the company revenue, or saves them cost. If something like PDF converter is a usefull tool to you, why not propose it up the management chain as a STANDARD install on all desktops.

It sounds like you want to use a business PC as a personal PC. I understand the need to feel comfortable in a work environment, but you have obviously never had to work in an IT support environment. Standard PC builds are much easier to troubleshoot and support than having 100 desktops/laptops that are "almost" standard, except for the 100 odd programs randomly installed all over the network.

If you really need something to be productive, no management or IT chain is going to limit you, unless you've been a PITA in the past. Reap what you sow.

Caused by advertising (1)

BPPG (1181851) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773934)

This is complete un-based speculation, and I'm also a "Millennial"(firefox sp) myself. But here's a thought: Do you think that maybe all that electronics and software advertising specifically targeted at my generation is what encourages them to use it?

Slashdot Financial Advisory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773940)


All I can say is SELL.

P.S. Thank this WAR PROFITEER [whitehouse.org] .

Sincerely,
Kilgore Trout

BitTorrent (1)

PaulG.1 (1198147) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773944)

And young employees are more likely to use bittorrent/file sharing software using company resources and bandwidth. And it's tough to stop it since the supervisors and IT guys are doing the same thing.

Security aware? (2, Insightful)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773952)

"...namely that younger workers will use your corporate network to run most any device, technology or social networking software they can get their hands on. Dubbed "Millenials," these workers born after 1980 are nearly twice as likely to use cell phones and PDAs at work, and half admit to installing unauthorized software on their employer's computers. On the upside, the Millenials are more security aware than their older co-workers."

Um, no. That they install unverified social software on corporate machines and socialize at work means they are not more security aware. Social access is the number one security breach method.

corepirate nazis risk to planet/population rescue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22773954)

& you can bet your highly mortgaged/indebted .asp the ultimately fatal problem(s) didn't start yesterday. let yOUR conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071229/ap_on_sc/ye_climate_records;_ylt=A0WTcVgednZHP2gB9wms0NUE [yahoo.com]
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080108/ts_alt_afp/ushealthfrancemortality;_ylt=A9G_RngbRIVHsYAAfCas0NUE [yahoo.com]
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A [nytimes.com]

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying [google.com]

dictator style micro management has never worked (for very long). it's an illness. tie that with life0cidal aggression & softwar gangster style bullying, & what do we have? a greed/fear/ego based recipe for disaster. meanwhile, you can help to stop the bleeding (loss of life & limb);

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/28/vermont.banning.bush.ap/index.html [cnn.com]

the bleeding must be stopped before any healing can begin. jailing a couple of corepirate nazi hired goons would send a clear message to the rest of the world from US. any truthful look at the 'scorecard' would reveal that we are a society in decline/deep doo-doo, despite all of the scriptdead pr ?firm? generated drum beating & flag waving propaganda that we are constantly bombarded with. is it time to get real yet? please consider carefully ALL of yOUR other 'options'. the creators will prevail. as it has always been.

corepirate nazi execrable costs outweigh benefits
(Score:-)mynuts won, the king is a fink)
by ourselves on everyday 24/7

as there are no benefits, just more&more death/debt & disruption. fortunately there's an 'army' of light bringers, coming yOUR way. the little ones/innocents must/will be protected. after the big flash, ALL of yOUR imaginary 'borders' may blur a bit? for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available. 'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet, & by your behaviors. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable. some of US should consider ourselves somewhat fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate. it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc.... as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis. concern about the course of events that will occur should the life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order. 'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continue on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US. gov. bush denies health care for the little ones;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html [cnn.com]

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html [cnn.com]

& pretending that it isn't happening here;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3086937.ece [timesonline.co.uk]
all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

(yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles. talk about reverse polarity;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece [timesonline.co.uk]

Security aware!?! (1)

conares (1045290) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773986)

On the upside, the Millenials are more security aware than their older co-workers.

On the downside, that doesnt really matter when theyre installing Bitlord and Lime(Frost)wire...

I'm in my mid-20's (4, Insightful)

failedlogic (627314) | more than 6 years ago | (#22773992)

I'm in my mid-20's so I think I would fit into this "generation" gap and want to comment on this. And no, I'm not at work presently to post this, in case the inescapable irony strikes some readers.

I know some of my peers feel that simply having access to the Internet means they can use it during the workday either to take a break during the work period, not work at all or use the Internet on breaks. My friends don't do this but I have had co-workers who have and were generally disciplined and eventually fired for not doing their assigned work.

Personally, I feel that I have an obligation to my employer: 1) to do the tasks I am assigned and 2) to protect the information on their networks. I avoid using the Net at work for non-work tasks and social networks for these reasons.

You danged kids! (1)

snarfies (115214) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774038)

Wouldn't the simple solution be not to give people admin access unless they actually NEED it?

Works for your kids, too.

Posting from work (1)

tick_and_bash (1256006) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774080)

While I am posting from work, I get the impression that the article is too underdeveloped to even be worth reading by the majority of the /. crowd. (I am aware that most won't read the article at all.) I'm more interested in how they came up with their statistics. If this was a Q&A session as opposed to monitoring employees over a period of time, then the results aren't worth a shit. I especially love how less than 40% of either category uses their work PCs for personal reasons. Unless you know you're being monitored at any given time, I doubt that statistic.

Age, not generation (5, Insightful)

khendron (225184) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774082)

This article appears to be taking a stupid slant on the statistics that have been gathered. It keeps harping about the "Millenials" (people born after 1980) when really it should say "people in their 20s". My issue is that 20 years from now, the Millenials will be in their 40s, but it will still be the people in their 20s who are the greater risk. The Millenials are not a generation of risk takers, they are currently at the risk taking age.

When I was in my 20s, I was much more risk prone than I am now (in my 40s). Back then I considered it my *right* to be able to install whatever I wanted on a computer, and would be unconditionally annoyed and offended if it was not allowed. Today I am more aware that there are reasons for most restrictions. Yes, some restrictions don't make sense, but a very many do.

This type of thinking was in more aspects of life than just computers. Back in my 20s, I would say that I drove less cautiously than I do today. I drank more heavily, ate poorly, resented having to wear a bike helmet, jay-walked more often, the list goes on. These are all behaviours that I, and most people, grow out of.

Risk? Risk my ass. (1)

Nitemare14 (1256834) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774136)

I'm at work right now, and I've installed Firefox, a bunch of extensions, AntiVir to replace the nonexistant antivirus that wasn't installed, Spybot, and Miranda IM.

Exactly how am I posing an increased risk to the network here?

False Positive... (1)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774138)

I am 30. So I suppose that makes me a Gen X or NeXt or whatever label should be associated with me.

Anyway we are just better at hiding all the crap we install.

Heh (4, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774152)

I'll remember this article next time that me, born in 1982 has to go round removing all the shareware games like Kyodai that all the middle age helpdesk women have decided to install on their computers because the 40 yr old manager we have thinks they should be free of security restrictions even if it causes such problems and creates security risks for the network.

Or when I'm dealing with silly amounts of calls because one 40+ yr old colleague is stood outside on their mobile phone arranging with their wife who is doing the cooking and the other is browsing holiday sites deciding where to go on holiday next.

Articles like this are stupid, they're a generalisation and where I work it couldn't be further from the truth. 3 out of 4 of our 1980s+ born workers and 1 out of 12 of our pre 1980s born workers make up our best 4 workers, that's completely out of line with the articles findings and whilst I realise you always get anomalies from statistical samples you should also not try and dress up this kind of bullshit as general fact.

In fact look at TFA, as hard as that is when it insists on jumping to the next stat before you've had chance to check the page properly I don't notice any information how solid a test base they used.

For all I know this could be put together by some disgruntled middle aged worker who actually sucks bad at his job but like many would rather blame someone else and so decided to blame the younger generation for taking his work.

Anyone know how reasonable a test base was used for this study? As it stands I could equally put together a made up study claiming older people are more likely to steal from the work place and pass it off as being fact.

Worst of all, they're 32% more likely... (3, Funny)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774172)

...to use ten animated web pages to display data that could have been presented better in ten lines of text using old-fashioned print media.

Who is more likely to F the computer up (1)

esocid (946821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774186)

Like one other poster pointed out, the older seem to be more likely to execute anything they receive in emails or click on the intarwebs. My brother worked in IT for an engineering firm and believe it or not engineers would still open malicious files and infect the network. It may or may not be generational but anyone can be educated about these things.
The PDA thing appears to me to be resisted by young and old. Yeah it's cool you can get internet connectivity but that means you can be reached potentially anytime to do something work related. Your boss can email something to your phone for you to work on at home or on the weekend. That is blurring the line between work life and home life, and I would prefer not to be bothered (unless it's something extremely important) if I'm not at work with something that can wait 12 hours.

whoreabull fairytail coming to an end? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774206)

just today, not tomorrow, or yesterday, you could have bought one of 'america's' largest BROKERages for the cost of the annual pay of 2 of its' employees. what a deal? better days ahead?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080317/ap_on_bi_ge/jpmorgan_bear_stearns;_ylt=A0WTUddvl95HgSQAWhOs0NUE [yahoo.com]

let yOUR conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071229/ap_on_sc/ye_climate_records;_ylt=A0WTcVgednZHP2gB9wms0NUE [yahoo.com]
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080108/ts_alt_afp/ushealthfrancemortality;_ylt=A9G_RngbRIVHsYAAfCas0NUE [yahoo.com]
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A [nytimes.com]

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying [google.com]

dictator style micro management has never worked (for very long). it's an illness. tie that with life0cidal aggression & softwar gangster style bullying, & what do we have? a greed/fear/ego based recipe for disaster. meanwhile, you can help to stop the bleeding (loss of life & limb);

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/28/vermont.banning.bush.ap/index.html [cnn.com]

the bleeding must be stopped before any healing can begin. jailing a couple of corepirate nazi hired goons would send a clear message to the rest of the world from US. any truthful look at the 'scorecard' would reveal that we are a society in decline/deep doo-doo, despite all of the scriptdead pr ?firm? generated drum beating & flag waving propaganda that we are constantly bombarded with. is it time to get real yet? please consider carefully ALL of yOUR other 'options'. the creators will prevail. as it has always been.

corepirate nazi execrable costs outweigh benefits
(Score:-)mynuts won, the king is a fink)
by ourselves on everyday 24/7

as there are no benefits, just more&more death/debt & disruption. fortunately there's an 'army' of light bringers, coming yOUR way. the little ones/innocents must/will be protected. after the big flash, ALL of yOUR imaginary 'borders' may blur a bit? for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available. 'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet, & by your behaviors. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable. some of US should consider ourselves somewhat fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate. it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc.... as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis. concern about the course of events that will occur should the life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order. 'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continue on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US. gov. bush denies health care for the little ones;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html [cnn.com]

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html [cnn.com]

& pretending that it isn't happening here;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3086937.ece [timesonline.co.uk]
all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

(yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles. talk about reverse polarity;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece [timesonline.co.uk]

Another dependable Gen X behavior - Power Point (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774270)

Given the attempt to present something that could have easily been a two-paragraph blog post as an incredibly-annoying, auto-advancing, Power Point slide show, I'm going to assume the compiler of this study is a member of the apparently much more dependable Generation X.

Slashdotters! (1)

sm62704 (957197) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774272)

In a C|Net story the other day I commented that I refused to go there, despite the fact that there is the off chance I might learn something that would increase my productivity because of tha two paras per screen and all the ads. When someone mentioned adblock and Firefox I replied that I was at work.

He said something along the lines of "you're a nerd, can't you install it without detection?"

As a 55 year old geezer, today's story confirms my suspicians: he's a 20 something whippersnapper.

What's sad is that the way I read the summary, it says these folks are security conscious but don't give a rat's ass about their employers' security. Guys, look, even I take my cell phone to work, but you should stop installing crap that you're not supposed to. It's not your computer and it's unethical and immoral to install something on a computer without its owner's permission. Would you install a nitrous kit to your employer-provided company car? Shades of Cheech and Chong!

-mcgrew

Everybody understands coffiemachines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22774286)

"admit to installing unauthorized software"

At work we have a free coffie machine, that I admit to using. It's free and noone has told me not to use it, it's generaly accepted that since they put it up, and made it free, we are allowed to use it. They could have made it require money to work, in fact it's just a simple option in the menu, but they didn't. Some would assume this to be to simple to mention.

Why then is it extreme to assume that when my company pays dedicated personal to set up computers in a way that allows me to install and run arbitrary software, that I then should assume that I'm allowed to do such?

They have the power to not just disallow it, but to make it impossible (Or reasonalble impossible) but instead the decide to use "off the shelf" solutions and try to make them work by appending usage rules.... It's not the new kids that are the problem, it's the old idiots who just don't understand how they are trying to run their companies.

Damn Kids! (1)

glomph (2644) | more than 6 years ago | (#22774292)

Get off my lawn, you!

Off my network, too! Especially if you run that commie Linucks or Mac stuff! Unamerican!
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