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Programmer Buys Original Ada Lovelace Painting On eBay

kdawson posted about 6 years ago | from the mother-of-us-all dept.

Programming 86

An anonymous reader sends the story of the rediscovery of an original painting of Ada Byron at about age 4, the girl who was to become Countess Lovelace and the world's first computer programmer. A US Army sergeant in Tajikistan caught wind of an eBay auction of a 180-year-old painting of Ada Byron, with provenance; he notified a programmer buddy in Texas, who won the auction.

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86 comments

I have an idea (-1, Offtopic)

ellenbee (978615) | about 6 years ago | (#22853972)

I have a piece of the first code ever written

Re:I have an idea (0, Troll)

edwardpickman (965122) | about 6 years ago | (#22854074)

I have a piece of the first code ever written

Yeah but when you install Vista Service Pack One it overwrites that code.

Re:I have an idea (-1, Offtopic)

kaos07 (1113443) | about 6 years ago | (#22854428)

Same thing happens when Ubuntu's partitioner screws up. Oooooh, karma burn!

No, seriously, Vista blows.

oh.... ADA Lovelace... (2, Funny)

bennomatic (691188) | about 6 years ago | (#22853982)

I was thinking of a different Lovelace...

Re:oh.... ADA Lovelace... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22854244)

I knew that she could felate the hell out of a penis back in the 70s, but I had no idea she was a painter as well.

Re:oh.... ADA Loveloose (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22866236)

Insensitive clot.

You are condemned to co-exist for all eternity with Adm. Grace Hopper, and discuss nothing but COBOL:
        05 PICTURE IS X"2**122" VALUE IS "BLEAK"

BJs optional, at her discretion.

And no sneaky sips of Pinoqachole.

     

Nigel Lovelace? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855328)

> I was thinking of a different Lovelace...

What, Nigel? He must be about 40 by now. I wonder what he is up to.

suspicious? (4, Insightful)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | about 6 years ago | (#22853990)

well pardon me for being skeptical but after reading:

It was assumed that the original portrait had been lost forever, until a Canadian antique dealer put the original framed watercolor sketch on eBay
I think it might still be lost forever if you know what I mean. Usually when someone just kinda "finds" a painting and puts it straight to ebay, IT'S A FAKE!

Re:suspicious? (1)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | about 6 years ago | (#22854006)

You have to assume that there was some sort of contract between them.

Re:suspicious? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22854056)

You have to assume that there was some sort of contract between them.

I've read & reread your comment, but I don't see an analogy of any sort, let alone a bad one.

Perhaps you should've said "Just like Clinton has some sort of contract in place to protect her if George Bush turns out to be fake, You have to assume that there was some sort of contract between them"

Re:suspicious? (2, Funny)

j_166 (1178463) | about 6 years ago | (#22856532)

"Perhaps you should've said "Just like Clinton has some sort of contract in place to protect her if George Bush turns out to be fake, You have to assume that there was some sort of contract between them""

I'll be damned if I can find the car reference in your analogy. Therefore, its not a proper analogy. Are you sure you didn't mean ""Just like Clinton has some sort of contract in place to protect her if George Bush turns out to be fake, You have to assume that there was some sort of contract between them, sort of like the contract you have with your neighbors not to steal your car when you leave it unlocked and running at the post office""?

Re:suspicious? (3, Insightful)

cavePrisoner (1184997) | about 6 years ago | (#22854054)

Experts soon agreed that the portrait was done in the 1820s when Ada was approximately four-years-old.
Perhaps the experts are wrong, but personally I'm of the opinion that if its good enough for the experts its good enough for me.

Re:suspicious? (4, Informative)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 6 years ago | (#22854174)

Two words - "with provenance".

Paintings of nobility from the 1800's are not in short supply, they are usually valued by the reputation of the artist not the subject of the painting. It's much more likely that the dealer had no idea why geeks would be more interested than art collectors.

Re:suspicious? (4, Insightful)

will_die (586523) | about 6 years ago | (#22854616)

If the item shown in the article is the "provenance" then it does not qualify.
A real provenance needs to make specific reference to the article and have specific and traceable details about the past owners. This looks to be just a quick history of the painter, if it was the correct painter. There is nothing that directly relates to the painting or who the painting is of.

As for the subject I presume they would of done a quick search of the subject, the painter, Frank Stone ARA, is fairly famous for his painting and mainly for being the father of Marcus Stone. Marcus was really famous in his time and was a close friend of Charles Dickens. Any search for Ada Byron links right to a history of her. So you have a painter who has some name recognition and a named subject who is easy to research; tie that in with a tech savy, sells on ebay(tech savy may be a strech) but aleast is capable of doing some searching.

BTW, what was the final selling price for this?

Re:suspicious? (1)

BForrester (946915) | about 6 years ago | (#22860308)

A heads up to anyone interested in hunting for the sell price. The item is no longer listed under ebay's "completed listings."

Re:suspicious? (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 6 years ago | (#22879972)

"If the item shown in the article is the "provenance" then it does not qualify."

I understand 'provenance' but this is slashdot, how the hell would I know what's in TFA? ;)

Re:suspicious? (5, Interesting)

leicaman (1260836) | about 6 years ago | (#22856182)

Robert is a friend of mine. Has been for almost 20 years. And I can confirm this is real as far as he is concerned, and he's done his best to confirm its veractiy. It's not a fake. And such accusations without proof are libelous (being in written form), no doubt based on jealousy, not to mention is basically irrational.

Re:suspicious? (3, Informative)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 6 years ago | (#22857898)

And I can confirm this is real as far as he is concerned, and he's done his best to confirm its veractiy.

Who cares what he believes or what he's 'confirmed'. 'Provenance' in the art and antiques world means something - it means an expert has performed the research and certifies the item is real. For an item this important, it's a quasi legal document, signed and notarized - with a full description of the item, a full description of the research, and a full description of why the expert believes the item in question to be real. It's not a handwritten biography of the supposed subject of the provenance on a sheet of letterhead.
 
Mandatory disclaimer: I have been a used and rare bookseller and have dealt with provenances on a minor basis.

And such accusations without proof are libelous (being in written form), no doubt based on jealousy, not to mention is basically irrational.

Wrong on all three counts.

Motive? (2, Interesting)

Weaselmancer (533834) | about 6 years ago | (#22859100)

And such accusations without proof are libelous (being in written form), no doubt based on jealousy, not to mention is basically irrational.

Wrong on all three counts.

Let's see, the OP is saying he is convinced the painting is real, he is doing his best to shut up anyone questioning his claim, and he is claiming anyone who does question his claim is irrational.

You know, if someone was trying to sell a fake they'd do these exact three things. Make a claim, try to silence opposition to the claim, and discredit his detractors.

I'm not saying it is a fake, I'm just saying this guy is obviously paving the way for selling the painting, but doing it exactly like a con artist would. Don't believe me? Check out antiques auctions on eBay. The guys who are full of bologna do the exact same song and dance. Especially people selling old armour. Bury it in their backyard for a few months, dig it up, then make those kind of statements.

"This is a real Roman Cavalry helmet."
"Stop nitpicking about the details or I'll report you to eBay abuse. You're screwing up my auction."
"If you not a real historian then shut up, you don't know what you're talking about."

Re:Motive? (2, Interesting)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 6 years ago | (#22860840)

Let's see, the OP is saying he is convinced the painting is real, he is doing his best to shut up anyone questioning his claim, and he is claiming anyone who does question his claim is irrational.

Not quite - the OP is a friend of the buyer and is defending him.
 
 

You know, if someone was trying to sell a fake they'd do these exact three things. Make a claim, try to silence opposition to the claim, and discredit his detractors.

Much more likely the friend (Robert) has a great deal of emotional investment in his collection - and his friend is merely trying to defend him. Such is life online. (Notice the typical threats of libel, veiled attacks ad hominem etc...?)
 
 

I'm not saying it is a fake, I'm just saying this guy is obviously paving the way for selling the painting, but doing it exactly like a con artist would. Don't believe me? Check out antiques auctions on eBay. The guys who are full of bologna do the exact same song and dance. Especially people selling old armour. Bury it in their backyard for a few months, dig it up, then make those kind of statements.

Oh, I could tell you tales that would curl your hair from when I ran a used and rare bookstore... You wouldn't believe the stories people will tell.
 
But the thing that makes me wonder is why the painting showed up on eBay. If the antique dealer is serious and knowledgeable and the piece is provably authentic... Then I'd expect it to appear at a real auction house, not on eBay.
 
Actually, rereading the article, I note something interesting - there is no claim the painting was ever really authenticated. Only that unnamed 'experts' dated it. (Which in reality is something impossible to do right without physically examining the artifact.)
 
I'm not sure it's a deliberate con - but it does smell of amateurs who haven't done the homework they aren't qualified to do in the first place.

Re:suspicious? (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | about 6 years ago | (#22860006)

are you kidding me? Saying that the painting it real without proof is irrational and libel and blah blah blah. You're pretty immature and whiney, you know that? Well as soon as Ada's painting sues me for insulsing it by saying it might not be real, I'll give a crap. And OMG get real, I'm not jealous. I didn't even know who she is and I'm not one of those arrogant, self important people who need to own rare art to feel special.

Re:suspicious? (1)

Kazoo the Clown (644526) | about 6 years ago | (#22861592)

It looks to me that the letter simply confirms that there was an artist who lived at the right time, and there may be an old painting painted at the right time and possibly by that same artist -- BUT not that it's a painting of Ada Byron...

A.I... (5, Interesting)

headkase (533448) | about 6 years ago | (#22854024)

Ada Lovelace was the daughter of Lord Byron who was strongly associated and interacted greatly with Percy Shelly who was married to Mary Shelly. Mary Shelly wrote Frankenstein which - wrapped in the language of the times - was a stab at Artificial Intelligence - but without intelligence separated from the physical representation (i.e. no concept of an artifact such as a computer) so artificial life was the metaphor instead. Blah blah blah I should go on Jeopardy.

Let's not neglect Percy (4, Informative)

symbolset (646467) | about 6 years ago | (#22854124)

Shelly [wikipedia.org] "is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language."

That's a strong endorsement. Lord Byron had an interesting group of characters about him. Between them they make Generation X look like a bunch of prudes.

Since he died before Mickey Mouse was born, you can find all of his works here at project Gutenberg [gutenberg.org].

Oh - support Project Gutenberg. When works in the public domain are forgotten we all lose something precious.

For shame (1)

Moderatbastard (808662) | about 6 years ago | (#22856604)

You link to an article containing his name in the URL and you still manage to spell it wrong.

Re:For shame (1)

billcopc (196330) | about 6 years ago | (#22857330)

You criticize like a nazi and you still manage to miss the point.

EPIC FAIL!

GP did it on purpose to gently correct without making a huge stink of it!

Re:A.I... (0, Offtopic)

doktorjayd (469473) | about 6 years ago | (#22854900)

heh,

i had a girlfriend in university whose honours thesis was on 'femminist themes in mary shelleys frankenstein'

so, naturally i retort with 'monster story, MONSTER STORY'... .. needless to say, didnt last long.

Re:A.I... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855302)

Yeah, Jeopardy might be the best career option open to you and the millions of other creative writing students out there who read Frankenstein.

Seriously dude, this is SLASHDOT. Having read Frankenstein -- your learned discourse on its cultural implications included -- doesn't even place you in the top 1,000 most qualified Jeopardy candidates reading Slashdot.

Re:A.I... (1)

Lisandro (799651) | about 6 years ago | (#22856002)

Ada Lovelace was the daughter of Lord Byron who was strongly associated and interacted greatly with Percy Shelly who was married to Mary Shelly.

My, that sounds like a bad soap opera plot...

Re:A.I... (3, Funny)

batquux (323697) | about 6 years ago | (#22857336)

Ok, so just following your lead here....
Colin Clive played Dr. Frankenstein in the 1931 movie, then was in Clive of India (1935) with Don Ameche, who was in Things Change (1988) with Clark Gregg, who was in The Air I Breathe (2007) with Kevin Bacon.

6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon - on Slashdot? (1)

charleste (537078) | about 6 years ago | (#22857674)

OMG! It's true! Ada Lovelance > Lord Byron > Percy Shelly > Mary Shelly > Colin Clive > Don Ameche > Clark Gregg > Kevin Bacon... so they're separated by 6 - is that right?

Next up.... (5, Funny)

grilled-cheese (889107) | about 6 years ago | (#22854070)

Next up on the auction block, the moth Grace Hopper pulled from a Mark II on September 9th, 1947.

Re:Next up.... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22854138)

That stupid moth keeps showing up in all my computer programs. You can have it!

Re:Next up.... (1)

francium de neobie (590783) | about 6 years ago | (#22854700)

Ironically, I just spotted it right below your reply. It says...

404 Not Found

The requested URL /iframe/tech.html was not found on this server.

Re:Next up.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855194)

Funny indeed, but on a serious note if sold I'm sure it would fetch a very high price.

Re:Next up.... (1)

Envy Life (993972) | about 6 years ago | (#22856232)

Might want to take a gander at one of Cringely's latest columns disputing the moth story as the origin of a "bug"

It turns out that "bug" was a common term for hardware glitches and dates back to the 19th century and possibly before. Edison used the term in a letter he wrote in 1878. This is no earthshaking news, of course, but simply reminds me how self-centered we are as an industry and there really isn't much that's truly new.
http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/2008/pulpit_20080314_004511.html/article [pbs.org]

Sorry (3, Informative)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | about 6 years ago | (#22854094)

I can't give "world's first computer programmer" to Ada Lovelace - I have to give it to Joseph Marie Jacquard [wikipedia.org], inventor of the Jacquard Loom [wikipedia.org]. Babbage's Analytical Engine [wikipedia.org] was to use cards - based on Jacquard's idea.

Re:Sorry (4, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | about 6 years ago | (#22854160)

I can't give "world's first computer programmer" to Ada Lovelace - I have to give it to Joseph Marie Jacquard

But Jacquard wasn't programming a computer - he was programming a loom. Not that we're not indebted to him, but a loom is not a computer.

Re:Sorry (4, Informative)

RodgerDodger (575834) | about 6 years ago | (#22854280)

Got to back that up. Babbage always gave credit to Jacquard for the idea (of using cards), but his personal spin on it was to make it general purpose - to solve any problem that could be expressed in the form of an algorithm.

That's the power of the computer - the fact that it is general purpose, not single purpose.

FWIW Jacquard got the idea of using cards to control looms from earlier mechanised looms that used cylinders with raised dots - which in turn came from mechanical music organs.

Re:Sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855048)

what about Heron and his programmable theatre [wikipedia.org]?

Re:Sorry (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22856570)

Neither Heron nor Jaquard had considered conditional jumps and loops. Without those, it's not a computer, it's an automaton. The biggest issue with Ada Lovelace is whether she wrote those programs or whether she merely reported what Babbage had done. Her role was supposed to be to document what Babbage had done - it's only in the appendices of that description that there is any programming - but is it the case that she added these appendices herself - or was it at the direction of Babbage?

Hence we may never know whether she was the first programmer or merely the first tech author.

However - as others have pointed out - WRITING software is only a small part of what a programmer does. Someone who merely writes programs but doesn't have to debug them is not yet a true programmer.

Re:Sorry (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855918)

What Ada realised that Babbage missed wasn't programming as such, but realise the potential of abstracting the 'input' so that it didn't just do number crunching. Which is, in essense, what a programming 'language' is.

There was a very interesting discussion on the BBC here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20080306.shtml [bbc.co.uk]

About Ada Lovelace and her relationship with Babbage that you can listen to.

Re:Sorry (2, Interesting)

cpuffer_hammer (31542) | about 6 years ago | (#22854418)

But since the Analytical Engine was never built (within her lifetime). She was never faces with debugging, code maintenance, or any of the other boring parts of the programmers trade. So can she really be given the credit of "world's first computer programmer". Or is it unfair to blame a software person because the hardware developers let the schedule slip.

Re:Sorry (5, Funny)

Magada (741361) | about 6 years ago | (#22855020)

Well, you have your answer right there in your question. Didn't debug or test before releasing, code maintenance is left to whoever inherits it, there's almost no documentation and there are no comments in code. A Real Programmer through and through, if you ask me.

Re:Sorry (2, Informative)

lamona (743288) | about 6 years ago | (#22858732)

The difference between the Jacquard Loom and Babbage's Analytical engine is explained by Ada Lovelace in her Notes on the Analytical Engine: [fourmilab.ch]

The Analytical Engine, on the contrary, is not merely adapted for tabulating the results of one particular function and of no other, but for developing and tabulating any function whatever. In fact the engine may be described as being the material expression of any indefinite function of any degree of generality and complexity, such as for instance, F(x, y, z, log x, sin y, x p, &c.), which is, it will be observed, a function of all other possible functions of any number of quantities.

In other words, the jacquard loom could follow a set sequence, but the analytical engine could be programmed to tabulate any mathematical function. That is the brilliance of Babbage's work.

In his Sketch [fourmilab.ch], Babbage lays out the workings of the Analytical Engine, but only Ada's notes point out, in clear language, the true impact of his discovery.

20k cards ought to be enough for anyone (1)

craighansen (744648) | about 6 years ago | (#22861060)

If you read http://www.fourmilab.ch/babbage/sketch.html [fourmilab.ch], Ada Lovelace clearly was the inventor of software bloat.

"Perhaps the immense number of cards required for the solution of any rather complicated problem may appear to be an obstacle; but this does not seem to be the case. There is no limit to the number of cards that can he used. Certain stuffs require for their fabrication not less than twenty thousand cards, and we may unquestionably far exceed even this quantity."

Knowing that she was bled to death at the age of 36 she ought to be the patron saint of programmers everywhere...

Re:Sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22863236)

Let's say he was the first Domain Specific Language programmer instead ...

I was excited until... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22854100)

...I read that the painting was done before she got all hot. Go recover paintings of her from her twenties!

Dude... She's four. (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22854200)

Dude... She's four. How do you buy a portrait like this without being a filthy pedophile?

Pedobear approves.

First Program (3, Funny)

kemushi88 (1156073) | about 6 years ago | (#22854214)

What do you suppose a "Hello, World" program looks like for an analytical engine?

Re:First Program (1)

RDW (41497) | about 6 years ago | (#22858322)

Probably rather like a stack of cards with holes punched in them! This site actually has some examples of programs for an analytical engine emulator based on Babbage's specifications:

http://www.fourmilab.ch/babbage/cards.html [fourmilab.ch]

http://www.fourmilab.ch/babbage/contents.html [fourmilab.ch]

Don't forget the 'P' card ('Print the result of the last arithmetic operation performed by the Mill on the Printing Apparatus').

Yuo Fail It! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22854264)

the above is far = 1400 netBSD

About Lady Ada (5, Funny)

vigmeister (1112659) | about 6 years ago | (#22854320)

In spite of inpiring generations of programmers, Lady Ada Lovelace remains the last known female programmer. According to lore, Countess Lovelace developed a protocol for what is now known as instant messaging. When she armed the regular patrons of 'Ye Olde Slash of the Dot' with this technique, she found herself endlessly harassed by messages inexplicably containing the letters A, S and L separated by slashes. She purportedly proceeded to found a secret organization that trains female programmers but also strictly forbids them from identifying their professions to the male species. Patrons of the similarly community gathering location named Slashdot are still eagerly awaiting the first woman who is caught unawares so that they can ask her if she would like to cyber.

Cheers!

The Cogwheel Brain (4, Informative)

91degrees (207121) | about 6 years ago | (#22854760)

In Doran Swade's book - The Cogwheel Brain - it's suggested that Ada Lovelace's influence on computer software was somewhat exaggerated. Letters from her certainly suggest she had a severely inflated ego.

As far as major role models for female software developers go I pick Grace Hopper, who is on record as having had considerable involvement in computer development, and may, or may not have coined the term "computer bug".

Re:The Cogwheel Brain (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855572)

According to Wikepedia, "she might more accurately be described as the first publisher of a program, as she published a program written by Babbage". I think it calling her the "first programmer" is a leap. I think at most she is what Jules Verne was to the space program.

Re:The Cogwheel Brain (1)

Vexor (947598) | about 6 years ago | (#22860764)

As far as major role models for female software developers go I pick Grace Hopper, who is on record as having had considerable involvement in computer development, and may, or may not have coined the term "computer bug".

Grace Hopper is only a jump (bad pun, I know) away from grasshopper..."computer" bug huh. I smell conspiracy.

Women and programming... (1)

scubamage (727538) | about 6 years ago | (#22855818)

Makes me wonder why there aren't more female programmers tbh... women *did* start the field...

Pictures of 4 year old girls??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22855970)

I wonder what FBI list this guy is now on for buying pictures of a 4 year old girl off of eBay??

Re:Pictures of 4 year old girls??? (1, Funny)

j_166 (1178463) | about 6 years ago | (#22856628)

"I wonder what FBI list this guy is now on for buying pictures of a 4 year old girl off of eBay??"

Particularly a 4-year-old with a pearl necklace. Oh man. I'm going straight to hell for that one, aren't I?

Child Prodigy? Should have been a painter! (1)

objekt (232270) | about 6 years ago | (#22856720)

That's one awesome painting for a 4-year-old! It's cool that she was the first programmer, but she really missed her calling if she didn't paint more!

Re:Child Prodigy? Should have been a painter! (1)

iknowcss (937215) | about 6 years ago | (#22857168)

I don't think that "by" and "of" are replaceable words.

An anonymous reader sends the story of the rediscovery of an original painting of Ada Byron

ADA sucks... at least as a programming language. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22856730)

it's the language that was the first one I studied in college. I came to it after being fairly good in Cobol in high school. I think it was mainly the 1994-1995 bugs, worms, and stupid advanced programmers that kept screwing with the mainframe, but most of my programs ended up outputting a bunch of weird stuff like hearts, and other icons instead of what they were suppossed to output.

Making ADA the first language you have to learn for college kids, on mainframes that anyone in the university has access to is plainly stupid. Luckily, I eventually dropped the class, and thus ended my computer programming college career. I eventually took up some fine art classes, and went in to studio painting, thank God. I almost went in to illustration, but luckily avoided that by being very bad at calligraphy, which was what the prereq class for graphic design required you take for about half a semester... I ended up dropping that class, and got heavy duty in to art history and painting, sculpting, and a bunch of other skills that won't be obsolete in 3 years when new versions of programming languages and new versions of photoshop hit the market. Painting has advanced some with airbrushing, computer aided design, 3d design, but for the most part is pretty much the same now as it was back in the 1500s. Most folks taking computer classes can't say that since they'll have to relearn everything in less than 5 years just to keep up.

Re:ADA sucks... at least as a programming language (1)

JimTheta (115513) | about 6 years ago | (#22857606)

Most folks taking computer classes can't say that since they'll have to relearn everything in less than 5 years just to keep up.

If you think programming is all about the language and the syntax, then it's obvious how little time you spent exploring the field. Your exit from the field was a great loss to the discipline, I'm sure.

Prayer to Lady Ada (3, Interesting)

Johnny Fusion (658094) | about 6 years ago | (#22856996)

Lady Ada,
Look down upon this humble coder,
Guide me with your unerring logic.

Lady Ada,
Inspire me with your genius,
may I code a thing of beauty.

Lady Ada,
You set the path before me,
may I follow it for the rest of my days.

Tajikistan??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22857338)

Tajikistan??? Okay, are we making up countries now?

An 1832 engraving based on original painting (1)

audubon (577473) | about 6 years ago | (#22859902)

Here [npg.org.uk] is an image of an 1832 William Henry Mote engraving that was "probably" based on a work by Frank Stone, the artist who is supposed to have painted the original portrait. The image is rather small, but there is a striking resemblance to the painting depicted in the article.

Re:An 1832 engraving based on original painting (1)

audubon (577473) | about 6 years ago | (#22861590)

Another bit of info: although there is no current listing for "Bashford's Corner Ltd.", at "736 Seventeenth Avenue Southwest, Calgary, Alberta, Canada," one "Capt. C. C. Bashford" is listed as a director, and the following obituary is listed Here [ogs.on.ca]:

BASHFORD, Charles Christopher (1928-2005) Charles Christopher BASHFORD passed away peacefully in Calgary, Alberta on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at the age of 76 years. Christopher is survived by his loving wife, three children and three grandchildren. He was a well known Canadian antique dealer. Christopher was a member of the Canadian Antique Dealer's Association; served on the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board; Associate Curator of Decorative Arts, The Glenbow Museum; a founding member and a President of the Calgary Branch, International Wine and Food Society.
Perhaps the buyer's friend, who has posted above, (or the buyer himself) could satisfy our curiosity by providing further details, such as the name of the seller, the selling price, the names of the experts who authenticated the work, etc.
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