Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Researchers Create a Protein Map of Human Spit

samzenpus posted more than 6 years ago | from the doctor-saliva dept.

Biotech 110

Ant writes "United States researchers have identified all 1,116 unique proteins found in human saliva glands. It was a discovery they said on Tuesday that could usher in a wave of convenient, spit-based diagnostic tests that could be done without the need for a single drop of blood. As many as 20 percent of the proteins found in saliva are also found in blood, said Fred Hagen, a researcher at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York who worked on the study."

cancel ×

110 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

well well well (0)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879186)

dot dot dot

Yes... (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879438)

They collected saliva from a whopping 23 people to come up with this wonder list of proteins. Ever heard of genetic variation? dot dot dot seems appropriate...

Re:Yes... (5, Informative)

Eggplant62 (120514) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879618)

Funny thing is, companies like Genova Diagnostics of North Carolina [gdx.net] have been doing saliva hormone testing for several years now and have touted it as the only way to get true levels of estradiol, testosterone, cortisol, progesterone, DHEA and others. A doctor that I worked for 3-4 years ago to set up a fellowship in functional medicine was big into saliva testing and hormone balancing based on these saliva tests, and she's still doing some good work today. I know she's worked with lots of patients, mostly premenopausal and menopausal women, and has helped them with maladies that go along with menopause like headaches, osteoporosis, and all the uncomfortable changes that go along with the big change in life. Biggest problem she's had is getting the mainstream insurance companies to accept her work and the work of others that have gone toward supporting the use of saliva hormone testing.

Re:Yes... (2, Funny)

packeteer (566398) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880054)

I know she's worked with lots of patients, mostly premenopausal and menopausal women,

So you mean all women?

Re:Yes... (1)

Eggplant62 (120514) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880264)

No, I mean women in their 40s and on up, nearing that big change in life called menopause. What, I have to be this bloody specific for you idiots??

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22880278)

Time to go back for another saliva test. Hormones might be a bit out of whack.

Re:Yes... (2, Informative)

Carnivore (103106) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880902)

You're using the term "pre-menupausal" in a very specific way, like pre-eclampsia. You mean "in the stages immediately preceding menopause", but to someone not in the field, pre-menupausal can appear to indicate the stage of life before menopause starts--any female who hasn't gone through menopause.

I don't know a better term for it, but you can see how some people could get confused especially if they're pre-caffeineated.

Re:Yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22884926)

following a hormonally balanced diet can also help with menopausal symptoms. as a nice aside, your triglycerides drop, your hdl goes up (tg/hdl is one of the best indicators of chronic disease risk - less than 1 is great, 2 means time to start lowering your number, 3 means chronic disease is knocking at the door and 4+ pretty much means you already have a chronic disease that is impacting your life), you gain muscle faster, you lose excess fat, your energy increases and you feel great every day. There are a lot more good things, but that's a good enough list.

yes, i have experienced all of the above over the last 9 months:

1. dropped 20 total lbs (5'11", weigh 160 lbs, leanest i've ever been in my adult life).
2. progressed from 10 lb flies to benching 200 lbs (muscle gain is about 6 lbs, so i've actually lost over 25 lbs of excess fat).
3. currently progressing 5 lbs every 3 weeks on my bench press.
4. 95% of my allergies disappeared.
5. haven't called in sick in over a year - a first in my life.
6. energy is better than ever before.
7. i feel better in my 40s than i did in my late teens and 20s.

Here's a couple menopause related testimonials:

http://www.drsears.com/tabid/399/itemid/10858/Fish-oil-eases-her-menopause-symptoms.aspx [drsears.com]
http://www.drsears.com/ArticlePreview/tabid/399/itemid/9854/Default.aspx [drsears.com]

oh, and the two women with the most amount of olympic medals both incorporated the Zone Diet into their lifestyle. they are jenny thompson (12) and dara torres (9). jenny also holds the record for most gold medals by a female with 8. dara will be back competing in the 2008 olympics as a 41 year old - the diet is that good, people.

Re:Yes... (1)

philspear (1142299) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882548)

They collected saliva from a whopping 23 people to come up with this wonder list of proteins. Ever heard of genetic variation?


No, I'm sure they have never ever heard of genetic variation. Being biochemists, they are probably completely ignorant of the basics of biology.

There are over a thousand proteins in spit apperantly, identifying them from one individual alone is no easy or cheap thing. 23 is a good canvassing given the state of funding of the sciences and how much this must have cost. And how much genetic variation in spit do you expect? You're not likely to have even 100 proteins different between any two individuals. There are probably proteins out there that are in some people's saliva but weren't in the 23 due to genetic variation, but that will be pretty low.

A bigger issue would be threshold of detection, how do you know that these proteins actually have functions in spit as opposed to just being detectable in spit? And I would bet good money that non-genetic variation would make the biggest difference. A poster below brought up pre and post menopausal women. Given the immune system's links to mucosal layers, I would think that having a cold would also signficantly change your salivary makeup.

Again though, they have undoubtedly thought long and hard about these issues and might even talk about it in the paper.

Re:Yes... (1)

philspear (1142299) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882584)

Edit: "You're not likely to have even 100 proteins different between any two individuals..." should have continued "because of genetic variation."

Can't use this test (2, Funny)

Pikoro (844299) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879192)

in Singapore. Damn shame...

why can't people use the subject field (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879268)

correctly?

Re: why can't people use the subject field correct (-1, Offtopic)

Mathinker (909784) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879622)

-ly?

It's a bit short for my tastes. I often end up having to invest a lot of effort to squeeze down to the character limit.

Of course, your observation is correct for the post you commented on --- however, the poster might have split the subject text between the subject field and the comment for humorous effect, eh?

Apologies if you were going for the Funny, also; my "whoosh" detection isn't all that great...

Re: why can't people use the subject field correct (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879784)

It is an annoyance for me, yes. I don't think that the humor works at all, when the joke is split. Usually I have already read the punchline, and then after a WTF-moment, I try to figure out what the half-sentence meant.

It is called "Subject", and not "Setup" or "first half of the joke", after all.

PS, with a name like mathinker, I have to ask.. who's Mom are you thinking about?

OK, that was going for the Funny.

Why people can't use the subject field correctly (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882432)

1. Boring, plain subjects (like this one) don't get attention, and don't get moderated. You have to use a subject that grabs attention and stimulates curiosity if you don't want to get completely ignored. A lot of good comments go unnoticed because of they have nice proper subject lines.
2. In some cases, it enhances the humor (as has already been mentioned).

Re:Can't use this test (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879610)

On the other hand, the floorboards of the average autorickshaw in New Delhi will provide enough sample material to keep a supercomputing cluster busy for years.

Re:Can't use this test (1)

Fex303 (557896) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881366)

in Singapore. Damn shame...
...lah.

easy way to get 100% of the proteins (4, Funny)

ed__ (23481) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879200)

punch them in the mouth a few times.

i call dibs on the patent to beating patients as a diagnostic tool.

anyone want to participate in clinical trials?

Goatse (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879358)

Goatse. [twofo.co.uk] [goatse.ch]

You nerds love it.

Re:Goatse (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879880)

I can't understand these posts. Now normally i'd assume that the spam was from bots. Being all the nerds there are on /. one sick guy would spam goatse crap all the time. But someone dissing nerds? Either its a self hating bot-maker nerd in denial. Or real human beings are posting this which would be an order of magnitude worse.

Re:Goatse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22880294)

You must be new here.

(not the same AC as the goatse guy(s))

Re:easy way to get 100% of the proteins (1)

sukotto (122876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880354)

rule #1 You do not talk about Fight Diagnostics
rule #2 You DO NOT TALK about Fight Diagnostics ...

Just ring a bell (1)

Dareth (47614) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880632)

Soon patients will be properly conditioned to "drool" for the doctor when he rings a bell.
All the research has been done. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Pavlov/ [wikipedia.org]

Re:easy way to get 100% of the proteins (1)

street struttin' (1249972) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881150)

anyone want to participate in clinical trials?
I doubt anyone will be interested in requesting this treatment, but you could probably give out lots of free samples.

Damn (3, Interesting)

Per Abrahamsen (1397) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879206)

I read it as "Researchers Create a Protein Map of Human Spirit." Much more interesting that way.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879370)

Ditto..

I was thinking that human spirit was due to some chemical changes in the brain.

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879376)

I read it as "Researchers Create a Protein Map of Human Spirit." Much more interesting that way.
Ditto. Now do you believe in ghosts?

Punch the patient (-1, Redundant)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879216)

in the face... there'll be more blood associated proteins. Probably even as much as 100%.

GNAA penis birds needed! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879246)

What I want to know is: Where is GNAA?

I've been visiting site after site, IRC network after network and I hear nothing from them anymore?

The joy is drained out of my life! I NEED GNAA!

where is the "spit" tag (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879284)

time to start a new meme.

Re:where is the "spit" tag (1)

bcdm (1031268) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880444)

I'm more thinking the tag should be "spitorswallow".

How is this test administered? (1)

Chapter80 (926879) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879286)

Does this mean I have to take my girlfriend into the lab with me, whenever I want to get tested?

Yeah, I know, Slashdot == no girlfriend. Save your reply.

Re:How is this test administered? (0, Troll)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879308)

Sorry, but you can't get pregnant.

Now return that Arnold Schwarzenegger film, it's fiction.

Re:How is this test administered? (5, Funny)

iamdrscience (541136) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879944)

Who said the poster isn't a lesbian woman, talking about her girlfriend?

Sure, I know you're thinking "this is Slashdot, it's full of virgin nerd males, why would there be any lesbians posting on here"? Well sir, I believe that's just the sort of close-minded thinking that keeps hot lesbians off of Slashdot. To think, if it weren't for intolerant bigots like yourself Slashdot would surely be awash with not just lesbians, but promiscuous heterosexual women and even adventurous bisexual female couples looking for a third. You sir, should be ashamed of yourself.

No blood?! No needles?! (-1, Offtopic)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879290)

DO WANT DO WANT DO WANT DO WANT DO WANT DO WANT DO WANT!!!

(Yes, I know this is lame, filter. I don't care. It's true.)

(I'm really serious: that is what I said. Now let me say it.)

heh. (1)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879306)

build this diagnostic into paving slabs and fit it in the far East and you could test 98% of the population in a couple of hours I reckon. Seriously, what is it with spitting in the street out there? Yeah, yeah - kinda off topic.

ooook... (-1, Troll)

debatem1 (1087307) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879316)

and, having solved all OTHER problems, the brightest minds of our world turn to figuring out spit.
hell, meet handbasket....

Re:ooook? (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880158)

Librarian, is that you?

Re:ooook? (1)

debatem1 (1087307) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880588)

Not to the best of my knowledge. Am I missing a meme?

Re:ooook? (1)

FiloEleven (602040) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882032)

Not a meme, but a possibly obscure reference to the orangutan librarian of Discworld.

Re:ooook? (1)

debatem1 (1087307) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882232)

Got about 20 words into the first one and never found time to pick it back up again. Worth it?

Re:ooook? (1)

Captain Nitpick (16515) | more than 6 years ago | (#22885034)

Got about 20 words into the first one and never found time to pick it back up again. Worth it?

The Colour of Magic isn't that great. It's basically a bunch of loosely-connected stories parodying fantasy tropes. The book has its moments, but it mostly serves to introduce the setting for the later and IMO better novels.

Re:ooook? (1)

debatem1 (1087307) | more than 6 years ago | (#22886252)

huh. skip it and read the next one?

At first I wanted to make a funny (4, Interesting)

Martian_Kyo (1161137) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879320)

but after rtfa, I must say it is pretty cool. The spit based tests would make the trip to hospitals whole lot less stressful. However what is not mentioned is reliability of these tests, or mainly how many false positives it gives for let's say breast cancer. If 100% of women with breast cancer have a certain protein, but also 60% of women who don't have breast cancer have that same protein, it makes the test...well less effective.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (3, Insightful)

zwei2stein (782480) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879392)

As long as you know reliability scope of test, i.e. that it gives false positives and never false negatives, test is worth it.

Simple test like this could be very effective at bringing up potential problems which can be investigated and verified by more accurate tests.

Also, you can use lots of such "unreliable" tests to build reliable model ... logic is great tool if used correctly.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (2)

Martian_Kyo (1161137) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879410)

I suppose if the processing of the spit is cheap enough it could be used as some sort of preliminary test.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (1)

fbartho (840012) | more than 6 years ago | (#22885096)

Well, for example, using the GP's hypothetical situation, knowing that it has no false negatives could be easily used to rule out breast cancer as a cause. So if a patient comes in and tests negative, then they can cheaply, instantly rule out breast cancer, and move on to other possible causes...

presence - absence - ratios (1)

chrisjbuck (950790) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879588)

Just thought I would point out some techniques that can quickly(?) tell you a great deal about the quantities of various proteins, iTRAQ is one: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITRAQ [wikipedia.org] . So an effective assay might look at the ratios of dozens of proteins and their relative abundance, not that iTRAQ is scalable for regular clinical tests. It is quite expensive as kits. On the other hand if twenty proteins seem to be key indicators of cancer a protocol using antibodies for each to partially purify the proteins followed by iTRAQ and MALDI mass spectrometry http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maldi [wikipedia.org] could be reasonably cost effective. It depends on how remarkable the differences are between well:sick people. A simple elisa test is all you need is a yes/no question on if a protein is there. The next step is just looking for good correlations between people having diseases and changes from the "fingerprint" of what is normal, it seems quite promising.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (2)

value_added (719364) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879792)

but after rtfa, I must say it is pretty cool.

I decided just for a lark to see if there was a Wikipedia article on spit. And lo and behold, there was an article on both saliva [wikipedia.org] and spitting [wikipedia.org] . The latter is an entertaining read, but the article on saliva is equally good.

Didja know, for example, spit contains water, mucus, antibacterial compounds, enzymes, and electrolytes? Add sugar and some colour, and it sounds a lot like Gatorade. Or that the average person produces just under a litre a day of it? The brief discussion on licking wounds is interesting, too. I've been in an ongoing debate with everyone that's subjected their dogs to topical antibiotics and funnel collars to prevent the animal from licking its wounds, as instructed by the veterinarian, but contrary to what mother nature intended. Seems there's evidence on my side that licking wounds does help them heal.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881352)

Licking wounds helps them heal for the first few licks.... then it aggravates the wound which will then never heal. Add to the fact that the same vet probably supplied a topical antibiotic that is 100 times more effective for whatever infection the dog has, which the dog would promptly lick off and you have a good case for a funnel collar.

If our natural immune system (or our dogs') were the best cure for all disease/infection, we wouldn't have discovered more potent treatments.

Licking is the best immediate action as it will clean the wound, deposit some anti-bacterial enzymes and overall prevent some otherwise nasty infections. Over a longer term healing period though you should take the advice of your health consultant.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 6 years ago | (#22883204)

Licking wounds helps them heal for the first few licks.... then it aggravates the wound which will then never heal.

Well, that's the advice you get from the vet, but it's so general that it's almost as meaningless.

For example, take the term aggravation. What's aggravating, the pain from the wound itself, or an irritation that would mitigated by cleaning up the wound of what's causing the aggravation. Animals have little to no problem dealing with pain, but if something is irritating them, they'll most certainly stop to fix whatever the problem is. And their noses are sufficiently capable of diagosing it.

Then there's the possibility that the very act of licking has other benefits. We scratch when we itch. We hold our foot when we stub our toes. Those behaviours were dismissed as psychological rather than medical defenses until recent studies showed that holding your injured foot does mitigate pain by blocking certain nerve impulses. Put another way, it's fair to conclude that not scratching an itch, or not holding an injured foot is counterproductive, if not outright wrong. Hell, it may even stimulate all sorts of immune responses no one knows of. For an animal, their only defense is to lick. To somehow suggest that the defenses mother nature gave are useless is an arrogance possibly only for those who spend all their time in a lab, or shopping in drugstore aisles.

As for the issue of the potency of any given medication, that may be true but it's simplistic to assume that just because an antibiotic, for example, is prescribed by a trained and qualified professional, the drug is going to fix the problem, and not complicate it. or cause other problems. That's the unfortunate reality of almost all drugs. And who would question that some drugs, antibiotics in particular, are overprescribed?

I've had dogs with persistent and chronic ear infections that were treated by potent antibiotic/antifugal applications for years. I wan't able to determine whether the antibiotics caused problems, but I did learn they were mostly ineffective. What was effective was a course of treatment suggested by a girlfriend familiar with yeast infections -- use vinegar and keep everything clean. The problem magically disappeared in less than week. Licking, I'm sure would have worked similarly if their tongues could reach that far. Anecdotal evidence? Perhaps, but medical science rarely has good solutions for chronic conditions of any sort.

The point here is that medical science is limited to what it knows at any point in time. Veterinarian science is the red headed stepchild that gets takes all its cues from its parent. Neither of those groups are going to spend much time studying or giving thought to something like saliva, so the business of selling funnel collars and topical creams will continue unabated, while cats and dogs and animals of all sorts will go on prefering to lick their problems away.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22883278)

Saliva often contains tetanus, which can be pretty nasty.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (1)

William Robinson (875390) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879838)

Yeah....sounds good to me too.

I was always skeptical while giving blood sample for any reason....suspecting it could be used for DNA analysis.

IANAE, but feel that spit can't be (mis)used for DNA analysis. Hope some expert could comment on it.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (1)

nahdude812 (88157) | more than 6 years ago | (#22883334)

I am not a forensic scientist, but I believe it's common practice to use saliva recovered from discarded coffee cups, cigarette butts, and the like to recover a DNA sample. I don't know how complete the DNA is (ie, could it be used by your health insurance company to deny you coverage for a genetic condition), but I'd imagine it depends on how old the saliva is, and how exposed it is to compromising factors like temperature or chemicals. I believe the source of the DNA is the soft cheek cells which are probably constantly being scraped off by your teeth. Some of these cells may still be living, so it might be possible to recover complete DNA.

From a medical perspective, spit analysis seems like a fantastic source of valuable medical information. From a privacy perspective, this scares the crap out of me. Collecting a spit sample is a lot less "intrusive" (I quote that because it feels less intrusive, though it's quite possibly just as intrusive in actuality) than contributing a blood sample. It's a simple enough process to collect that it could be collected without consent, or it could be commonplace to require such a collection for completely trivial matters. A person's genetic background may then open and close doors for that person completely independent of if those are valid. It's like Gattaca.

Re:At first I wanted to make a funny (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881512)

Well sir, we've gotten your spit test results back and according to this your blood consists of a mixture of chocolate and caramel, and you are packed with peanuts.

Hey he was my neighbor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879322)

I grew up in Rochester and he was my next door neighbor!

Go him!

Hmm. (0, Redundant)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879348)

What is "As many as 20 percent of the proteins are found in saliva are also found in blood[...]" supposed to mean?

Re:Hmm. (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879694)

What is "As many as 20 percent of the proteins are found in saliva are also found in blood[...]" supposed to mean?

That more than 80% of those proteins aren't found in blood?

Re:Hmm. (0, Offtopic)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879770)

I wonder if the moderators know what "redundant" actually means. Furthermore, redundancy is actually a *good* thing. We build redundancy into systems all the time to ensure that our message (signal, transfer, whatever) reaches the target as intended. Checksums are a form of redundancy as well. Backups are redundant data. None of these things are bad.

Re:Hmm. (0, Offtopic)

Wavebreak (1256876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880336)

Redundancy in a system and redundancy in discussion are two entirely different things. Perhaps it's you who should check what the word means.

Re:Hmm. (1)

biobogonics (513416) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879922)

What is "As many as 20 percent of the proteins are found in saliva are also found in blood[...]" supposed to mean?

About 20% of the time, people do NOT secrete blood group antigens into their saliva or other body fluids. Before DNA analysis it was common to look for blood type in crime scene investigations. 80% of people are "secretors", the other 20% are harder to catch.

see http://www.ncsu.edu/kenanfellows/2002/pligon/forensics/notes/BloodNotes.html [ncsu.edu]

Re:Hmm. (0, Offtopic)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879964)

Oh I see. We need to leave out the "are" just after "proteins", ending up with a sentence that makes sense. Cool.

I'm bodybuilding (1)

jlebrech (810586) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879434)

Will that start drinking spit

Reads TFA...

Never Mind..

killing me are the sentences (1, Funny)

Mystic Pixel (911992) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879440)

My apologies for the pedantry, as I'm not normally one to be the grammar police, but I just can't tolerate the sentence structure of this post. Let's try again:

"Researchers in the United States announced Tuesday that they have identified all 1,116 unique proteins found in human saliva glands. The discovery could usher in a wave of convenient, spit-based diagnostic tests that could be done without the need for a single drop of blood. Fred Hagen, a researcher at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York who worked on the study, said that as many as 20 percent of the proteins found in saliva are also found in blood."

Not perfect, but much more readable, would you not agree?

(Coincidentally, the fortune at the bottom of the submit page reads, "Drawing on my fine command of language, I said nothing." I find that more than a little strange...)

Fill this, fill that... (5, Funny)

Waccoon (1186667) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879504)

Man, it's hard enough to fill those little cups with urine, but now they want a cup full of spit? They'd better have a good, stimulating magazine to help with that, like Texas Chili Monthly.

Protein Map of Human Swallows? (2, Funny)

PHPfanboy (841183) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879536)

Would that come under biology or ornithology?

Re:Protein Map of Human Swallows? (1)

i_liek_turtles (1110703) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880236)

Pornography.

Re:Protein Map of Human Swallows? (1)

Hillgiant (916436) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880322)

Urology

Re:Protein Map of Human Swallows? (1)

thewiz (24994) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881244)

What about pornography?

Re:Protein Map of Human Swallows? (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881988)

African or European swallows?

PubMed Link (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879564)

Here is the link to the Journal article [nih.gov] . I'm reading through this now, but I'm hoping to god they characterised the glycosylation on these babies, it should help tie my PhD thesis together quite nicely.

spit research (0, Troll)

macshit (157376) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879566)

It was a discovery they said on Tuesday that could usher in a wave of convenient, spit-based diagnostic tests

Oh, sure, that's what they told the funding bodies, but let's be honest: they did this research simply so they could publish papers with titles like "A Comprehensive Analysis of Spit."

clean (1)

MancunianMaskMan (701642) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879620)

My brother, who works in a museum restoring old wooden objects, sometimes uses spit to remove stains. he smiles and says: this needs an enzymatic clean... spit...rub... gone. Does this research mean that some chemical company can now manufacture and sell this stuff? Superfluous nonsense. Spit is brilliant, also excellent for wiping spectacles, and to remove stains from clothes.

Re:clean (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880420)

Spit is also great as an anti-fog agent inside diving masks.

Ditto for car windshields when you've accidently gotten some Fantastik or Spray 9 on them while cleaning the dash ...

Also, saying "I protein map on your grave" sounds like something Dougie Howser in "Harold and Kumar go to White Castle" would do ...

Next step..... (1)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879674)

is to clone spit so we might finally have a cure for dry mouth. The makers of Gatoraide have called this Frankenscience and tampering with the natural order of things. They've sponsored a bill called "Ban Dolly's Spit". "Where will it end" said a spokesman for the company? "Are we gonna clone sweat next?"

Re:Next step..... (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879886)

Maybe the fake spit will be developed at Florida's in-state rival Florida State. Then the new product can be called Seminole Fluid.

Thanks, folks. I'll be here all week. Don't forget to tip you waiters.

getting lost will suck from now on (1)

MassiveForces (991813) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879684)

"Hey dude have you got a map?" *gets a wad shot at her* "Ewww! What the hell was that for?!"
"well you didn't say what kind of map..."

Depending on What/When She Spat... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879782)

there could be a whole lot more than 1116 protiens!!!!!

Da Bump Chaa.

Easy Nature Paper (1)

LaskoVortex (1153471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879868)

Find something like spit, earwax, or the gunk between your toes, do shotgun DNA sequencing, and call it a something-ome. For bonus, you could supply the sequences as an attached PDF file (I'm not kidding, something like this has been done--800 pages of PDF "supplemental material"). I find these articles in major journals about once a week and they are as boring to read as the list of ingredients on a box of cereal.

Why do they call it a "map"? (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879882)

Genome is called a "map", because you "map" genes to the positions in chromosomes and plasmids. This is the first time I see proteome (idiotic term as well) being called a "map".

Re:Why do they call it a "map"? (1)

Wavebreak (1256876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880376)

English is a living language, thus the word 'map' has come to mean something somewhat different in the context of biology, medicine etc.. And no, that's not a bad thing.

Re:Why do they call it a "map"? (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880728)

Are you a molecular biologist?

Re:Why do they call it a "map"? (1)

Wavebreak (1256876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881970)

No, and I'm not even a native English speaker, yet I still understand what's meant by the word in this context, so as far as I'm concerned it's a perfectly legitimate use. Claiming otherwise is just pedantry. (How's that for a run-on sentence?)

Re:Why do they call it a "map"? (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882036)

The problem is that you are talking about matters that you have no idea of. Now, please, go away and contribute to something you know about.

Re:Why do they call it a "map"? (1)

Wavebreak (1256876) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882250)

The problem is that you are resorting to ad hominem attacks rather than actually arguing your point. Now, please, go away and bully some schoolchildren or something.

Hmmmmm..... (1)

IHC Navistar (967161) | more than 6 years ago | (#22879884)

Is that the protein level before or AFTER a date?

Ya know, there are just too many jokes that can be made about this article.....

knobligate seizure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22884672)

Ya know, there are just too many jokes that can be made about this article.....
Unsurprising some people feel a little overwhelmed by the humour prospects of a glandular fluid that doesn't make your sweat socks crunchy. The brain locus responsible for obligate low humour contains a mere 1100 neurons, with extensive dentritic projections to bad hair day and tilting sideways to release gas.

This lobe is easily traumatized, such as discovering that the girl in your class you've been fantasizing about daily for three years still doesn't know your first name.

Primary symptom of knobligate seizure is incessant repetition of memes that long ago ceased to be funny, until the extreme repetition itself is momentarily funny again, at which point the trauma of psycho-sexual oblivion is finally discharged.

Immunity is conferred by owning a jersey with your name lettered in all-caps across the shoulders.

Partial immunity is conferred by owning a jersey with someone else's name lettered across the shoulders, if the person is known to have outrageous earning potential, has a tribal affiliation in good standing to the local community, plays a full contact sport (NB: in a men's league), and never, ever grips another man's testicles except to better recover a fumble.

For some reason, lettering your name onto the back of your Van Halen T-shirt with masking tape has not been observed to work.

at least we know the ingredients...... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22879914)

& that they're more valuable than robbIE's patentdead/fully censored/stock markup FraUDster owned decaying blog.

Like a Family Circus map? (1)

rodney dill (631059) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880066)

Mt. Hoark
Drool Falls
Booger Bayou
Loogie River
Ptui Peak

Why have the proteins been unknown until now? (1)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880132)

Are there some difficulties involved in finding them? How does one do?

Side note: I for one like needles and stuff, cause I'm interested in medicine and that is as close as I usually get to it. I donate blood, that's a great thing! You get in contact with medical care and get to do things to your body (which is nice, if you're bent like me), you save other people's lives in an old-fashioned "every one need to help now" way (makes it feel like war times) and you can play jokes on the overly caring nurses by standing up quickly and pretending you are about to faint from blood loss. :-)

Wow! Metabolomics is progressing! (1)

flajann (658201) | more than 6 years ago | (#22880140)

Metabolomics has progressed from urine to spittle! Wow, and less smelly!

gnifffffff (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22880170)

9hh9h99h9hUIHHO yh88hh88hh8h8 lnljln 5d5d5d5d5dd5 FCCFRTFC flsflhhophopho;fdsa PO NEGAte neGAte negATE d7ga5rqrfvcCRFRC ..,.,.,.,, ,fd, feds fggT^GGTGTG fsaaaaaaq

Tricking the test (1)

aarku (151823) | more than 6 years ago | (#22881614)

Make sure and gargle with egg whites before you walk into the doctor's office?

Saliva serves many functions (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 6 years ago | (#22882734)

It starts digesting food.
It attacks germs coming into mouth and alimentary canal.
It may have aphrodesiac properties, stimulating love making.
Its an emergency fluid/lubricant.
It may be social communication - spitting, drooling.
Its state is indicative of physical health.
Others, I've forgotten.

A thousand proteins sounds fair.

"University of Rochester in New York" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22883096)

Yes, Rochester is in New York State, but it's quite far from New York. A common observation from someone who isn't familiar with the region would be, "oh, it's in New York City!" It's actually a 7 or so hour drive.

Yet when people say Buffalo, Syracuse, or Albany, no one gets confused.

How many human proteins total? (1)

SiliconEntity (448450) | more than 6 years ago | (#22884166)

How many different proteins are made by the human body as a whole, if over 1,000 are in saliva? Do current DNA maps tell all the proteins? What are the current esimates?

Great News! (1)

QuantumFTL (197300) | more than 6 years ago | (#22884288)

And kissing just got even sexier!
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>