Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

What Are Must-Sees For Open Day At the LHC?

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the don't-miss-the-hadrons dept.

Science 210

ribasushi writes "The last open day at the Large Hadron Collider is one week away. While I have a solid chance to go, I am dumbstruck by the insane amount of things to see during the 10 hours of the event. Since I do not know all that much about physics, I am turning to the knowledgeable crowd here at Slashdot — what do you think are the most awesome 5 must-see things on the agenda next Sunday?"

cancel ×

210 comments

Obligatory (5, Funny)

evanbd (210358) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917762)

xkcd [xkcd.com]

Re:Obligatory (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918004)

Fails at oblig.. someone link the hadron collider motivator and as many div by 0 catastrophes as possible

Re:Obligatory (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918900)

I am turning to the knowledgeable crowd here at Slashdot
You must be new here.

I think I am not alone when I say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22917768)

strangelets? Best if it get lose and suck in certain individuals...

Black Holes (3, Funny)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917782)

Why not go see the black holes. You'll finally be able to answer the question of what's on the other side of one!

Re:Black Holes (5, Funny)

lahi (316099) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917878)

Nah, black holes suck!

-Lasse

Re:Black Holes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918328)

Maybe we could use them to dispose of fission waste and CO2!

Re:Black Holes (1, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918102)

The whole reason they're called "black holes" is because they're invisible. You can only observe them by the effect they have on their surroundings, outside the event horizon.

I suspect that for most people, there isn't anything of interest to see at the LHC. Miles of corridors, rather non-impressive machinery, and a bunch of workstations. The receptionist might be the most spectacular sight. The results from the LHC will be interesting, but those you don't have to go to the site to see.

Re:Black Holes (4, Informative)

HuguesT (84078) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918664)

Black holes are not invisible on two accounts.

1- They emit black body radiation at the Hawkings temperature due to quantum evaporation, which for a tiny black hole is very high. A black hole created by an accelerator, composed of the mass of a few particles would likely be extremely hot for a very short time, and so would emit gamma rays. Wikipedia has the calculation for a 1kg BH : the lifetime is approximately 10^{-16} seconds, and the energy output equivalent to the complete anihilation of the 1kg mass (you don't want to be around). Small black holes are *fierce*, however subatomic ones don't really matter. After all accelerators anihiliate particles all the time.

The above is the #1 reason BH potentially created by accelerators are not a concern.

2- Even very large BH are in fact directly visible. They reflect light better [obspm.fr] than a highly polished metallic sphere.

These two facts are direct illustrations that most people, including well-educated scientists, don't know the first thing about BH.

Ask them... (1, Funny)

vought (160908) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917786)

If you can see the Xener Diode assembly and the Flux Capacitor.

Re:Ask them... (1)

orospakr (715849) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917820)

You do know that Zener Diodes exist, right? :P

Re:Ask them... (0)

compro01 (777531) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917840)

yes, but to Xener diodes exist? =P

Re:Ask them... (0, Offtopic)

vought (160908) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917850)

You do know that Zener Diodes exist, right? :P
Sure, but you might expect the large hadron colliderists to blink a few times if someone asked to see them.

Re:Ask them... (1)

Professr3 (670356) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918650)

Your Zener diodes. Show me them.

Flux Capacitors (5, Funny)

gc8005 (733938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917790)

You have *got* to see the flux capacitors! I realize that you're a bit new to physics, but please press hard to see the flux capacitors. Your guide may laugh uneasily - just keep pressing and don't take "No" for an answer. You won't be sorry.

Re:Flux Capacitors (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918120)

I must advise against asking about the flux capacitors. I tried, and it landed me in a psych ward for 10 years. I'm still waiting for the voices in my head to tell me what was so wrong about just wanting to see the flux capacitors. :'(

Other must-sees (4, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918238)

  • A Type 40 police box
  • Sub-ether electronic thumb (handy for escaping exploding planets)
  • Their back issues of 1001 more things to explode with magnets

Re:Flux Capacitors (-1, Troll)

Cryacin (657549) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918248)

Forget the flux capacitor.

Step into the parallel universe where Bush wasn't swapped with a monkey at birth. Now *that* is truly amazing.

My eyes are fooling me (0, Redundant)

kylehase (982334) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917796)

"Large Hadron Collider" I had to read that line several times.

I'm sure you were expecting .. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918054)

.. Small Hard-on Collider

Re:My eyes are fooling me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918098)

So am I the only one who read that as "small pathetic and impotent flopper"?

Hahaha (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22917802)

I am turning to the knowledgeable crowd here at Slashdot ...

Hahahahaha.... What drugs are you using ?.... I want some of that...mine are not working as good....

Re:Hahaha (3, Funny)

aitikin (909209) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918216)

I am turning to the knowledgeable crowd here at Slashdot ...

Hahahahaha.... What drugs are you using ?.... I want some of that...mine are not working as good....
I believe you meant not working as well

How's that for knowledgeable!?

*barely dodges flak*

Must see (0, Offtopic)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917808)

The faceless, chittering beings who are magicked into existence through the wormholes that thing is going to open up. Maybe you can at least slow them down a little bit so the rest of us have a chance.

      Have fun!

Re:Must see (0, Offtopic)

Barkmullz (594479) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918268)


The faceless, chittering beings who are magicked into existence through the wormholes

You must certainly be referring to these [wttf.org] ...


Re:Must see (1)

Professr3 (670356) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918668)

Are they being chased by a travelling chest on legs?

Crowbar (5, Funny)

apankrat (314147) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917830)

Make sure you know where to get one in case of an emergency.

Re:Crowbar (4, Funny)

plover (150551) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918008)

They say they'll have cake for the visitors.

Bring a can of spray paint, just in case.

Re:Crowbar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918174)

Who needs a crowbar? The only thing you need in any emergency is a towel. I've heard a wet towel can even be used to whip a black hole into submission. Imagine, a black hole at your command!

Re:Crowbar (1)

ajlitt (19055) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918190)

Is there anything in the corner of that towel that's effective against headcrabs?

Re:Crowbar (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918376)

Well, the first two corners contain essential vitamins and antidepressants, I'm sure that one of the other two would contain some form of delousing agent...

I ask one thing (5, Funny)

Mandovert (1140887) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917832)

Please, don't move carts with odd-looking crystals in teleporting devices.

Re:I ask one thing (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918068)

Oh, everything would probably be fine.. probably.

Re:I ask one thing (4, Funny)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918486)

I have this sudden urge to mail CERN and tell them to prepare for unforeseen consequences.

Re:I ask one thing (2, Funny)

laejoh (648921) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918810)

And check your^h^h^h^hfor a fly when entering the teleporting device!

naturally (1)

Andrew823 (1234604) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917844)

buying a "real piece of the LHC!" on a key-ring.

Re:naturally (3, Funny)

DarkAxi0m (928088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918504)

buying a real "Mini black Hole!" on a key-ring. :)

The black hole (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22917858)

See if you can goad the physicists into destroying the universe by creating a black hole. You know you want to.

NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (2, Informative)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917874)

Asking a Judge to Save the World, and Maybe a Whole Lot More

But Walter L. Wagner and Luis Sancho contend that scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research, or CERN, have played down the chances that the collider could produce, among other horrors, a tiny black hole, which, they say, could eat the Earth. Or it could spit out something called a "strangelet" that would convert our planet to a shrunken dense dead lump of something called "strange matter." Their suit also says CERN has failed to provide an environmental impact statement as required under the National Environmental Policy Act.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/29/science/29collider.html?em&ex=1207022400&en=fc4bb1d73347fe4e&ei=5087%0A [nytimes.com]

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (3, Funny)

CSMatt (1175471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918252)

The Large Hadron Collider is designed to fire up protons to energies of seven trillion electron volts before banging them together. Nothing, indeed, will happen in the CERN collider that does not happen 100,000 times a day from cosmic rays in the atmosphere, said Nima Arkani-Hamed, a particle theorist at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.
Yes, and it is only by the grace of God that these cosmic rays have not killed us yet.

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (2, Informative)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918562)

Wear a radiation badge when you next fly international. I'd love to know if passengers or crew are exposed to levels in violation of accepted limits. Since none have obviously mutated into X-Men-like characters, it may be hazardous but it's not world-threatening.

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (1)

CSMatt (1175471) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918624)

What a shame they didn't mutate. That would be awesome.

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (1)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918698)

It's not on the same timescale, but you can accurately date inorganic objects that have been exposed to cosmic rays, because the material actually does mutate. The isotopes change. It takes a few thousand years, but the only Stones not likely to be around that long seem to have found other methods. It's a useful technique in archaeology and geology when carbon dating isn't possible (no carbon or too old or too young).

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918494)

Don't worry, I don't think the rest of the universe would miss much if we blew up the earth.

In fact, there are some good arguments to turn the damn thing on, even if you know for certain it's going to destroy the planet.

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918544)

I just don't get it why NEPA should apply in Geneva, Switzerland, Europe.

Re:NY Times article, blackholes?! strange matter?! (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918828)

Judge: Is this true?

Venkman: It's true, sir. This man has *no* dick.

show me the money (1)

ncohafmuta (577957) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917942)

how about showing us some large hadrons colliding (and maybe a higgs boson), instead of having to wait until august of 2008? or better yet, wait until august 2008..could there be a better date for an open day, that they can actually show us what it can DO rather than just what we started building 10+ years and 2.6 billion francs ago.

Appreciation (4, Insightful)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917958)

I think the most valuable "things" you could see on your visit would be 5 physicists who actually do know enough about the subject to appreciate it, and who could maybe pass a smattering of that knowledge and appreciation on to you. Do not misunderstand me... the fact that you asked at all demonstrates that you value the experience and do not take it lightly. I know people who would give a lot to see what you will see.

Re:Appreciation (5, Insightful)

EEDAm (808004) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918088)

You are right that five physicists who actually know enough about the subject would be an awesome find. But since the poster is asking for guidance on what to see I suspect what would be even more awesome for them is a technically very able physicist who can translate their knowledge into plain english. If there is one thing that would spread the influence of science more than today, it is that rare ability to make it understandable to the general populace.

Agreed (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918150)

A valuable find indeed.

I'll take an autograph (1)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 6 years ago | (#22917960)

From Gordon Freeman. If you happen to see Alyx get one from her too.

You should see.. (1)

the dark templar (944143) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918006)

Higgs Boson. They say it will appeat at LHC magically.

Large Hadron Collider (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918022)

Ask them to put glow-on-dark condoms on them. Make sure post the pics back here.

Please... (5, Funny)

SeekerDarksteel (896422) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918044)

The LHC is just a tourist trap. It's like Times Square. You go thinking it's gonna be all fun, then you realize it's just a bunch of bright colors and earth eating black holes, and there's nothing to do there but shop for overpriced bosons you could've picked up for half price at a more nondescript collider.

Todo's at Large Hadron Collider (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918142)

1. Sneak out of line and Trigger a Resonance Cascade.
2. Use crowbar to pwn all opposing aliens and crates alike.
3. Turn the greatest scientific minds into mindless lever turning tools...
4. Follow the G-Man...

Thier new advert campaign. (1)

Digestromath (1190577) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918488)

Come for the groundbreaking experiments in high energy physics, stay for the wings and wet lab coat contests! Remember, Tuesdays are 'Name That Particle' night!

Re:Please... (2, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918540)

Ah, but the LHC has the hard to find Higgs Bosons. You can't get those anywhere else at *any* price, although I think Fermilab sells a decent knockoff.

Re:Please... (4, Funny)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918826)

there's nothing to do there but shop for overpriced bosons you could've picked up for half price at a more nondescript collider.

Actually, a lot of bosons are free of charge.

Bring a lawyer! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918066)

No, really.

People are suing trying to shut it down [nytimes.com] .

Most awesome must-see things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918082)

How about the Higgs boson?

Re:Most awesome must-see things (1)

lazy genes (741633) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918136)

The Higgs bison are at Fermi.

I'd go see the Atlas detector.. (4, Interesting)

gwait (179005) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918170)

Standard slashdot response - no one follows the link,
which shows that it's a large open house event with many activities.
Anyhoo, the Atlas detector looked very cool in a magazine I read recently (National Geographic?).

Personally I'd also try to see one of the pulse power supplies that drives the LHC injector kicker magnets, because my father's team designed them.
http://www.triumf.ca/publications/pub/arch05/pp-05-19.pdf [triumf.ca]

Yes you can tell I'm proud of him!

Re:I'd go see the Atlas detector.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918812)

You know, to the untrained eye that PDF would appear to have been auto-generated by this [mit.edu] .

What I'd like to see... (4, Funny)

Tuoqui (1091447) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918196)

The On switch/button :D

You can get the answer by repeatedly asking 'What does this button do?'

Re:What I'd like to see... (5, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918532)

Asking is no substitute for experimentation.

Obvious (1)

QuantumFTL (197300) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918204)

What should you see when you visit the LHC? Why not see what everyone else is hoping to see - the Higgs Boson!

If that doesn't work out, you can ask to see just about any other particle they make around there, there's certainly enough of them. But whatever you do, don't bring up Lexx...

Anyone else read this as "Hardon" (0, Redundant)

appleguru (1030562) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918208)

Maybe I just have a sick mind, or maybe it's because I know nothing about the subject.. But I could have sworn the article was talking about "large hardons.." :-)

Friendly extra-dimensional space critters? (0, Redundant)

joetheappleguy (865543) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918212)

Oh wait...We should be able to see those AFTER the thing is turned on.

see the detectors (3, Interesting)

ruck (156392) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918214)

If you get a chance, try to visit the caverns of either of the two main experiments (ATLAS or CMS). I saw CMS while it was still above ground (it was assembled there first, unlike ATLAS), and it was a sight to behold. ATLAS is probably even more impressive and maybe more convenient since it's at the main site. Aside from that, I'd try to get a peek at the computer center and take in some of the general lectures.
 
Have fun!

Re:see the detectors (3, Informative)

flogistic (1264904) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918558)

I went to LHC on a visit (school field trip by all standards) just last week and there's quite a lot to see indeed. I would also recommend the detectors especially since they're probably the most important part of the whole experiment and they also include a visit of the actual LHC tunnel. The two sites I would recommend are those in Meyrin where the main campus is (their cafeteria is pretty decent as well) and where the ATLAS experiment is located. While it may be quite impressive to see it, ATLAS is unfortunately closed so besides tons of cable and the external muon chambers you won't get to see much of the inner workings. However, most of the conferences seem to be concentrated around the campus area. There's also the Microcosm exhibit which, while somewhat simple, will probably be entertaining if you don't have a lot of experience with physics (especially the experimental setups). However, you must go see the CMS experiment at the Cessy site just because it's still open (well, it was last Wednesday) so you get to see the actual interior of the detector. Also, I think CMS is simpler to understand just because it's got a simpler setup than ATLAS. Only problem is Cessy is somewhat far from the main campus (not to mention it's in another country), but they will probably have some shuttles (not the "space" type) around for this. If you still have time, ALICE is probably interesting as well and it's located at the Crozet site. But you should have your schedule full with the two main detectors.

Re:see the detectors (1)

dvandok (94559) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918836)

I'm a real ATLAS fan... but it may be a bit disappointing. The experiment is nearly finished, and pretty much fills the entire cave. That means that you are not going to get a good feel for how big this thing really is: from whatever angle, you are standing too close.

If you are into computers, the computer centre where all the data is collected and distributed to other centres all over the world must be impressive.

--Dennis

LHC visit (2, Informative)

emeraldcity (1105793) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918228)

At the SLAC you can walk the length and they have an observation room exactly where the high speed particles will collide. You will want to see that part, where the sceintists will observe and whatever else you can learn. Hope to hear about your visit-maybe you'll see the Higgs or be able to visualize a magnetic field (like around when a lightning bolt strikes)-protected ofcourse! From the pictures, it must be an overwhelmingly awesome personal experience size-wise. (And a few days ago I was in awe seeing, again, how grand the Roman Statues are currently in the US on loan:))

The end of the world! (0, Redundant)

mr_tenor (310787) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918240)

The builders of the world's biggest particle collider are being sued in federal court over fears that the experiment might create globe-gobbling black holes or never-before-seen strains of matter that would destroy the planet.

http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/03/27/823924.aspx [msn.com]

For the WoW fans... (0, Troll)

dziman (415307) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918258)

Light's Hope Chapel?

Placebos (1)

logicnazi (169418) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918286)

I'm always amused by the idea of going and seeing scientific exhibits in person. Especially if you have no technical knowledge of them. I mean it's not like it really should be any better than just reading about it on wikipedia or the discovery channel but nevertheless I often find it rewarding.

So I've done a bit of thinking about this and my conclusion is that it's a combination of placebo effect and the presence of knowledgeable scientists who are good public speakers. In other words we could tell you any 5 things and so long as you really believed us it would make those worth seeing. True, it's not quite that simple. Some things simply provide more to stare at than others, but that's a large part of the effect.

Re:Placebos (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918406)

I'm always amused by the idea of going and seeing scientific exhibits in person. Especially if you have no technical knowledge of them.I mean it's not like it really should be any better than just reading about it on wikipedia or the discovery channel but nevertheless I often find it rewarding.
Shouldn't the same apply to, say, the Grand Canyon (unless you're a geologist) or the Great Wall of China (unless you're a historian or a construction engineer)?

Come and see (1)

Utopia Tree (1040146) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918296)

I'd say black holes, but you can't really see that can you? But you'll 'experience' it.

Re:Come and see (1)

lawrenlives (991376) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918310)

You can see the apocalypse, if you look real fast!

Go see the detectors (2, Interesting)

joshamania (32599) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918342)

Go see the ATLAS detector. The detectors are one of the coolest parts at Fermi's accelerator imho.

A serious answer (4, Informative)

confused one (671304) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918366)

If you have any interest at all in the detectors or accelerator, now's the time. Spend your time there; because, you won't be able to "tour" it later. Once it's been running the equipment will become activated (as in radioactive) and the public will no longer be able to tour the underground facilities. There will likely be physicists and technicians on hand who will be happy (excited even) to talk about what they've built.

you can always go back and look at the computer center, control rooms, or whatever at a future open house event (which I'm certain they'll have regularly, to keep the public interested).

For what it's worth, I worked as a technician at a U.S. DOE facility

Compulsory T-Shirt (4, Funny)

adamkennedy (121032) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918368)

"I visited the Large Hadron Collider and all I got was this radioactive T-Shirt"

Re:Compulsory T-Shirt (2, Funny)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918536)

"Scientists do it in tubes!"

Re:Compulsory T-Shirt (2, Funny)

auric_dude (610172) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918756)

I collided with the largest hardon and poked my eye out.

Watch the beam dump. (1)

viking80 (697716) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918528)

The energy of the beam is 725 MJ, and the magnetic field is 725 MJ. This is the same as 160kg and 2.5 tons of TNT.

I would recommend to be in the vicinity of the "beam dump" when the beam for on of about a million failsafe conditions is aimed there.

If nothing happens, you can probably induce a beamdump in any of a thousand ways. Use your imagination, or just look for big red buttons.

Ask why they call it "Large" (1)

Eternal Vigilance (573501) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918534)

I mean, Jeebus, anyone can see that it's large.

"Oh, excuse me, Dr. Physicist, I wouldn't have known if you hadn't told me." Stupid physicists.

(Though perhaps it's that physicists contracted out to the folks who classify shrimp...next up, the "Jumbo Hadron.")


"Mmmm...Jumbo Hadrons"

Simple (2, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918564)

ask for the keys and take it for a test collide!

Thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week, try the fish!

You know you're a nerd when .. (1)

quarrel (194077) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918592)

you ask for advice on how to fill 10 hours at the Large Hadron Collider!

--Q

Meet the people (1)

FoolsGold (1139759) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918620)

I hear the primary research assistant for the task, Gordon Freeman, will be at the event. Apparently he's the guy they picked to throw the switch that will start the collider. Make sure to take your camera!

(and a crowbar, just in case)

Things to check out (5, Informative)

mlassnig (204316) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918714)

Since I work here.... I might give a few clues:

- before you do anything, check the Microcosm museum in the reception building. This one will explain a lot what's happening.
- this one is a must: be sure to make a trip to either the ATLAS or CMS cavern (those are the two bigger detectors attached to the LHC)
- the ATLAS control room
- the LHC control room
- the computing centre in the IT building

- and if you have time, stop by for a tea in building 40 :-)

Re:Things to check out (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918888)

Check the fridge. Maybe you might catch a beer-drinking scientist onsite.

Must See (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918838)

I took part in their summer student programme last year and during that time we've been visiting all of the places that you can go visit now during the open day. My recommendations are:
If you're interested in detectors you have enough time to visit at least two of the four major experiments. CMS is a bit far away, it takes you some 20 minutes by bus to go there, ALICE and LHCb are closer and ATLAS is just across the road opposite the main entrance. I would recommend ALICE and ATLAS - ATLAS is, just like CMS, a multi-purpose detector looking for everything that's interesting in the unknown lands of energies accessible at the LHC whereas ALICE aims to study quark-gluon plasma produced in the collisions of heavy nuclei. Make sure to visit ATLAS last - if you thought the other detectors were huge ATLAS will blow you away!
Don't count on it that you get a peak inside the actual LHC tunnel while you are visiting the detectors. I don't know why but all of our guides were quite reluctant to just pull back the curtains so that we could have a look. Maybe there's a designated visit during the open day ...
For lunch go to restaurant 1 and enjoy the atmosphere there. It was one of our favourite places to hang out and have a fruit salad. It is always told that many ideas for experiments and theories first came up over a cup of coffee there, it's an exciting place and your chance to chat with some of the physicists there.
There's also a kind of graveyard for old parts of experiments close to the reception. I found the Gargamelle bubble chamber most impressive, a massive biest.
Last but not least try to visit the accelerator chain (LINAC, PS) - it's quite interesting to see the bottle containing the hydrogen that goes into the different accelerators and will eventually be accelerated to these mind-boggling energies.
Wherever you go and whatever you see, have a fun day at CERN - i sure envy you.
    Kilian

PS: Oh, and it's always nice to see the sign saying: "In one of these offices Tim Berners Lee invented the internet ..." - it's somewhere in building 2 if I remember correctly.

GET A KEY RING! (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918868)

It's there on their home page. Later, if you read in the papers, that some experiment produced negative results, you let out a sinister laugh, while twirling the keyring with your pinky, and say out loud, Not without this you won't! Fools!

Things to ask about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22918892)

Ask loudly if it's true that "if it produces a black hole then we would all be dead before we know it?"

You might also ask if you could see a Hadron.

Comment thread for nerds. Some stuff matters. (2, Insightful)

gilgoomesh (966411) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918908)

How sad that someone asks a questions about one of the coolest science projects in the world and the Slashdot community only wants to vote up the "Funny" replies. Poor form. Stop being so guarded and show us your geek. Seriously, how could you miss: "The levitating scooter, which will take volunteers for a ride suspended in the air" http://lhc2008.web.cern.ch/LHC2008/OpenDaysE/super.html [web.cern.ch]

T-Shirt (1)

taff^2 (188189) | more than 6 years ago | (#22918912)

"I went to the LHC and all I got was a third arm, a tail, six sets of testicles and radiation poisoning!"
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...