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Intermediate-Mass Black Hole Found In Omega Centauri

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the big-fleas-have-little-fleas dept.

Space 89

esocid sends us to the European Space Agency's site for news of a new discovery that appears to resolve the long-standing mystery surrounding Omega Centauri, the largest and brightest globular cluster in the sky. The object is 17,000 light-years distant and is located just above the plane of the Milky Way. Seen from a dark rural area in the southern hemisphere, Omega Centauri appears almost as large as the full moon. What the researchers discovered is a black hole of 40,000 solar masses in the cluster's center. From the press release: "Images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and data obtained by the GMOS spectrograph on the Gemini South telescope in Chile show that Omega Centauri appears to harbor an elusive intermediate-mass black hole in its center... Exactly how Omega Centauri should be classified has always been a contentious topic. It was first listed in Ptolemy's catalog nearly two thousand years ago as a single star. Edmond Halley reported it as a nebula in 1677. In the 1830s the English astronomer John Herschel was the first to recognize it as a globular cluster. Now, more than a century later, this new result suggests Omega Centauri is not a globular cluster at all, but a dwarf galaxy stripped of its outer stars. According to scientists, these intermediate-mass black holes could turn out to be baby supermassive black holes."

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Black Holes are like buses... (3, Funny)

PinkyDead (862370) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952428)

...never one when you need one - then three come along all at once.

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (0, Offtopic)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952482)

Why do my "reply to this" links now have an awful black button around them??? Oh god my eyes!!!
 
+9, old school
+15, hates any change to his beloved slashdot

Uh, surprise! Ugliness! (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952556)

APRIL FOOLS!

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (1)

LordNimon (85072) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952622)

I'd like to know where there is now two inches of wasted whitespace on the left side of every page. Why can't the comments be flush left?

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955660)

Wow, this is HIDEOUS! I expected to see the usual goatse posts we always get when black holes are mentioned, but this is worse that goatse! Ahhhhh my eyes!

Seriously, this new style is pretty bad.

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952666)

Does anyone who still has an old Slashdot page open have a link to a copy of the old CSS?

Slashdot today is uglier than OMG-ponies, and it's looking increasingly like it was by design and not by accident. I'm gonna need a copy the old CSS to override this crap.

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (0, Offtopic)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952848)

If you figure out how to override it, please share the solution with me, or make a firefox plug in. This is really awful. Yikes.

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (1, Offtopic)

brunascle (994197) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952942)

here you go, the web developer [mozilla.org] extension. enjoy.

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (1)

emjay88 (1178161) | more than 6 years ago | (#22958436)

In firefox: View -> Page Style -> No Style

Re:Black Holes are like buses... (1)

Rasit (967850) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952764)

Why do my "reply to this" links now have an awful black button around them??? Oh god my eyes!!!
Every time someone asks me why developers generally should not be in charge of GUI design I show them pictures of Slashdots various UI's :)

Another Link (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22955282)

In case anyone is inerested, here is a link to the article on Gemini's website:

http://www.gemini.edu/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=284 [gemini.edu]

There are a couple good pictures available.

Baby black hole (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952436)

Wow- what a headache. What would you feed it?

Re:Baby black hole (4, Funny)

eviloverlordx (99809) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952460)

Just about anything, really.

Re:Baby black hole (4, Funny)

the4thdimension (1151939) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952472)

It must have a lot of gas.

Re:Baby black hole (2, Funny)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952476)

Personally, I like feeing it trolls. But more just keep popping up.

What will they name it? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952468)

GOATSE.

Re:What will they name it? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952794)

GOATSE.
GOATSE is not an Intermediate Mass Black Hole. It's a Giant Black Ass Hole.

Re:What will they name it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22960336)

GOATSE.
GOATSE is not an Intermediate Mass Black Hole. It's a Giant Black Ass Hole.
you have to consider to run for president

Wow! Goldilocks it is. (5, Funny)

Dopamine, Redacted (1244524) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952474)

So, we've now discovered the biggest and smallest black holes known to exist within about a week of each other.

Now that we've found the most average, space bears will come and blast us into porridge.

Astronomy kicks ass.

Especially when the universe works like my mind wants it to [slashdot.org] .

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (4, Funny)

explosivejared (1186049) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952560)

Any non-Americans will be fine. Remember, bears of any kind are born with an innate hatred for America. They are godless killing machines. As an American myself... well it was nice knowing you all.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (4, Funny)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952598)

So, we've now discovered the biggest and smallest black holes known to exist within about a week of each other.
Not the "biggest". Scientists are excited because this is the most intermediate black hole mass ever found. You just can't get any more medium-sized than this. It is the blackest and most densest form that intermediateness can take on- no other massive compact object has been found to have quite this level of intermediacy.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (1)

calebt3 (1098475) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952902)

From GP:

Now that we've found the most average,

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (1)

Oktober Sunset (838224) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954836)

oh lols, he got modded funny. I guess it's still funny when the mods are laughing at him not with him.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22957510)

And they're going to name it Al Gore

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (1)

Ambitwistor (1041236) | more than 6 years ago | (#22962754)

But the real question is, how much more black could it be? And the answer is none. None more black.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (1)

The Fun Guy (21791) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952896)

Holy cow, you must be psychic!

Woah ... deja vu! The Matrix must be rebooting!

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (1)

EricWright (16803) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953728)

Did you read ... anything? Intermediate-Mass black hole seems to indicate its neither stellar sized (small) nor galactic-center super-massive (large) in size.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22955034)

He, earlier, posted in the story about the smallest known black hole. This was after the largest known black hole discovery. His post said that we're about to find the most medium black hole ever and then space bears will come and smash us into porridge.

This is the medium one.

Apparently you're the one who doesn't read anything.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 6 years ago | (#22960590)

Did you read ... anything? Intermediate-Mass black hole seems to indicate its neither stellar sized (small) nor galactic-center super-massive (large) in size.


Exactly. That is why this is the goldilocks black hole, unlike the previous two that were too big [slashdot.org] and too small [slashdot.org] . Please google for "goldilocks" to understand the cultural reference. It's a fairy tale and Wikipedia has a summary.

Re:Wow! Goldilocks it is. (2, Funny)

niktemadur (793971) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955242)

Three settings on the space bears' ray guns:
Stun, Kill and Porridge.

They'll hunt them down and find them, of course. In Ursa Major. When they open them up, they'll find that inside, they're full of people.
'Cause you know, sometimes you eat the space bear, sometimes the space bear eats you.

How dare they (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952486)

strip Omega Centauri of its globular cluster status. I hope the Pluto people will be just as vocal against this change.

Re:How dare they (2, Funny)

Sciros (986030) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952514)

Well what we can do now is release t-shirts that say "When I was your age, Omega Centauri was a globular cluster."

Re:How dare they (1)

el_coyotexdk (1045108) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952588)

well atleast a dwarf galaxy(albeit a crippled one) is still an upgrade from globular cluster. so this is a great event. what is this "pluto" you talk about? :P

If it walks like a duck, swims like a duck, quacks (2, Informative)

Latent Heat (558884) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953246)

Just because it has a central black hole doesn't make it a dwarf elliptical galaxy.

What distinguishes the Milky Way globular clusters is the the are all about the same, very old, almost as old as the Universe age. If there is reason to believe this is gravitationally bound to the Milky Way instead of some interloper, and if it has the same HR diagram turnoff point of other Milky Way globulars, there is no reason to think it is anything other than one of the bigger and fatter and closer of the globulars.

"baby supermassive black holes.." (5, Funny)

msauve (701917) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952498)

I propose calling them "jumbo shrimp black holes."

Re:"baby supermassive black holes.." (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952888)

Hey, that's my band's name, get your grubby mitts out of here!

Re:"baby supermassive black holes.." (2, Funny)

davesays (922765) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953160)

Funny, I was just going to say "Those have got to be either the title of the latest U2 album, or some crazy pr0n." But as it relates to actual black holes your proposed name is superb...

Re:"baby supermassive black holes.." (2, Informative)

ExploHD (888637) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953432)

So can we start calling asteroids "rock lobsters"?

Re:"baby supermassive black holes.." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22955472)

how the hell did that get modded informative? for real guys?

to clarify... (5, Funny)

spazdor (902907) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952518)

these intermediate-mass black holes could turn out to be baby supermassive black holes

So, instead of medium-size, they might actually be small big?

Re:to clarify... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952664)

Undead Supermassive Baby Sleeping Black Hole. So thats +5 for Undead, +10 for Supermassive, -5 for baby, -5 for Sleeping, +5 for...

Re:to clarify... (1)

mcvos (645701) | more than 6 years ago | (#22960604)

Has Munchkin [sjgames.com] suddenly become a valid meme for Slashdot?

Re:to clarify... (1)

esocid (946821) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952668)

I'm no astronomer or physicist but I think they are trying to say that intermediate mass black holes like this one can become supermassive black holes once the cluster of stars surrounding them die or contribute to it.

Re:to clarify... (1)

humungusfungus (81155) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955374)

Nonono, it's a Grande.

Why does the universe DO this? (2, Funny)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955626)

Doesn't the universe realize that it can get a Venti Black Hole for only $0.25 more?

Huge buttons (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952544)

I don't like the huge buttons, or all the wasted white space on the left. It'll be fine on my home PC with the widescreen monitor, but at work on the 1280x1024....

The boxes around each post and its children is helpful in staying within a parent's post; before I had to place my mouse on the left of a post and scroll up till I found it's parent.

Re:Huge buttons (1)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | more than 6 years ago | (#22960320)

Quit complaining. I have 1280x1024 at home and it is perfectly usable. Also, why are you reading Slashdot at work? Shouldn't you, I dunno, work? Mod me down if you want, but you really should be thinking about other things at work.

Re:Huge buttons (1)

hesiod (111176) | more than 6 years ago | (#22965444)

> Also, why are you reading Slashdot at work? Shouldn't you, I dunno, work?

BWAHAAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!! That's a good one. work...

Blackhole meme (0, Offtopic)

AioKits (1235070) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952546)

Can we use this to generate some new blackhole memes? Stuff like:
Blackholes are like opinions, everyone has one and they suck!
or
You can have blackhole when you pry it from my cold dead fingers!

Not askin for a handout here, just a blackhole.

Vocabulary lesson (0, Offtopic)

fm6 (162816) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952696)

  • meme [answers.com]
  • joke [answers.com]

    "Your comment has too few characters per line (currently 2.0)." Oh please. OK, here's some random garbage to satisfy the input nanny. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. Mare eat oats; does eat oats; little lambs eat ivy. A kid will eat ivy too (wouldn't you?). Xenu (also Xemu), pronounced /zinu/, according to Scientology founder (and speculative fiction writer) L. Ron Hubbard, was the dictator of the "Galactic Confederacy" who, 75 million years ago, brought billions[1] of his people to Earth in DC-8-like spacecraft, stacked them around volcanoes and killed them using hydrogen bombs. Scientology holds that their essences remained, and that they form around people in modern times, causing them spiritual harm.[2][3] Members of the Church of Scientology widely deny or try to hide the Xenu story.

Re:Vocabulary lesson (1)

AioKits (1235070) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952978)

While grasping at straws here, from your meme link:

Computer Desktop Encyclopedia: meme (Pronounced "meem") A trend, belief, fashion or phrase that is passed from generation to generation through imitation and behavioral replication. Coined by Richard Dawkins in his 1976 book "The Selfish Gene," memes and memetics are the cultural counterpart to the biological study of genes and genetics. Using the evolution analogy, Dawkins observed that human cultures evolve via "contagious" communications in a manner similar to the gene pool of populations over time.

Although if you've any blackhole jokes as well, let's hear em! PS - If you're gonna just post two words, wouldn't it be better to just send me a message? ;p

Re:Vocabulary lesson (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953564)

The two words are aimed at everybody; I really dislike this use of the word meme. I'm not trying to play Usage Nazi — language is meant to be played with. But "meme" instead of "joke" is lame and trite, like saying "automagically" instead of "automatically".

I was about to say that your quote from the CDE just represents usage, as all dictionaries and other language references do. Being cited in a reference doesn't make a lame usage non-lame.

But then I looked at your quote and realized that it actually documents my use of the word "meme". (That makes it out of date, since your usage, however lame, is common among computer folk.) You highlighted "phrase that is passed from generation to generation through imitation and behavioral replication." But if you read the whole entry, you'll see that there's more to a meme than imitation and replication:

Dawkins observed that human cultures evolve via "contagious" communications in a manner similar to the gene pool of populations over time.
So it's all about cultural evolution. Does inventing a new joke count as evolution? I think not.

Now, inventing a new kind of joke counts as cultural evolution — provided the new kind of joke catches on. Judging from the followups to your post, that's not going to happen with black hole jokes; all the replies are just rehashes of existing joke genres.

On the other hand, LOLcats definitely represent a new meme. Though you have to be a cat person (like me) to enjoy them.

Re:Vocabulary lesson (1)

AioKits (1235070) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953860)

Sorry, gotta examine this part here:

Does inventing a new joke count as evolution? I think not.

Semantics is so lovely to argue on message boards, it's like digital cock waving! Seriously tho, you think not? Why not? Since I'm lacking the time to take this any more seriously than you apparently are, I bow to you and your great mastery of the English language! Now, if you'll excuse me I have to add you to my friends list so I can pounce on the next mistake you make. Fun times! See ya in the reply.

Re:Blackhole meme (1)

Remus Shepherd (32833) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955150)

Perhaps it would be more appropriate to say, "You can have my black hole when you pry my cold, dead fingers out of it!"

Somebody must've created a large hadron collider (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952650)

But don't worry, we'll have a small black hole here on earth soon enough. :-)

jammed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22952700)

probably a smudge from when Lonestar jammed our hubble.

OMyGod its going to swallow us! (0, Offtopic)

peter303 (12292) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952882)

I feel it tuggging my leg now.

No, thats my dog I forgot feed breakfast.

Re:OMyGod its going to swallow us! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22954064)

Feed it quick before it starts humppping your leg!

In Soviet Russia... (0, Offtopic)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 6 years ago | (#22952952)

In Soviet Russia, baby supermassive black holes turn out to be you!

Ensign.. (1)

prickeke (897832) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953338)

..set a course for Omega Centauri, warp 2. Engage. [points finger towards screen]

What Happens To Other Civilizations? (2, Insightful)

MichaelCrawford (610140) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953448)

Sometimes I find myself wondering if there are alien civilizations close enough to supernovae, or black holes (which emit intense x-rays), or are in galaxies which suffer collisions, or whose home planets are hit by comets.

Any civilization without space flight capability - much more advanced than our own - would have no way to escape, and would be wiped out.

It seems like catastrophes on an astronomical scale are fairly common; how many intelligent beings have perished as a result?

Re:What Happens To Other Civilizations? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22955470)

None, since we're still here.

Re:What Happens To Other Civilizations? (1)

The Queen (56621) | more than 6 years ago | (#22956650)

Aw great, now you've gone and done it. *knocks on wood* Are we considered intelligent enough to be endangered by your question?

Re:What Happens To Other Civilizations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22959680)

How many individuals is a poor question, how many civilizations would be more meaningful question.

My guess, perhaps in the magnitude of a billion or so civilizations have come and gone.

what others have said (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22959734)

A few of these things only sound bad, but once you do the analysis are not a problem at all. Hard to tell which unless you think hard (which is called science) or read the reports of others who've thought hard:

Sometimes I find myself wondering if there are alien civilizations close enough to supernovae, or black holes (which emit intense x-rays),
A near-by supernova explosion would be absolutely catastrophic, as would straying into the particle stream ejected by a black hole. No good way around that without interstellar flight, so you're pretty much right. Using statistical arguments combined with the known movement of the solar system through the Milky Way along with stellar evolution and the resulting likelihood and expected proximity to Earth of supernovae, there are some astronomers/geophysicists/paleontologists who posit a correlation between major extinction events in Earth's history. For suitably chosen values of the incidence of supernovae over a suitably chosen model of galactic evolution (and thus star formation), and suitably chosen "major" extinction events, this is an intriguing possibility. You can draw a phase clock of extinction events and see a clustering (a "most common" approximate periodicity).

or are in galaxies which suffer collisions,
This actually isn't a problem, although it sounds bad at first blush. Galaxies do of course collide, but the individual stars are so vanishingly small in comparison to their distribution (i.e. they are sparsely distributed) that they essentially never collide. Another way of saying this is that what physicists call the "mean free path" of the particles (stars in this case) is much longer than the scale of the collision. Think of what would happen if you and a friend simultaneously threw a pinch of sand at each other from a distance of many times as far as the moon. In the analogy the grains of sand will be dispersed throughout many cubic miles/kilometers of space by the time the pinches "collide", so you will not be surprised that none of the grains themselves collide. With stars and galaxies, the only interaction among the stars is the gravity of each on every other star. The collisionless nature of galaxy interaction is why we use particle-particle simulations to model galactic collisions: it's the N-body problem and it requires cleverness to avoid the n^2 complexity inherent to the problem.

Look here for some pictures and a little more exposition:
http://www.galaxydynamics.org/spiral_metamorphosis.html [galaxydynamics.org]

And for cosmological-scale stuff:
http://web.phys.cmu.edu/~tiziana/BHCosmo/ [cmu.edu]

or whose home planets are hit by comets.
Technology to survive this threat is much less than you think. It's been available to humans since around 1960-1970. Orbital mechanics was well-established 50-100 years earlier. You just need chemical rocketry and Newtonian mechanics to avert such an ecological disaster; you don't need to abandon the planet or star system. If you can do the latter, you can certainly do the former.

It seems like catastrophes on an astronomical scale are fairly common;
"Common" is relative: it "seems" to me that the occurrence of an extinction-level event on inhabited worlds is relatively rare compared to the time it might take an intelligent species to progress from speciation to advanced space flight; say, 10^5 to 10^6 years. Even if there are few such intelligent species, they will seldom, if ever (statistically speaking), be wiped out by such an event because such an event is incredibly improbable during the tiny window between their initial existence and their developing the means to avert such a disaster.

Of course, statistical models are not physical reality; it might certainly happen occasionally even if you statistically predict "never". Some star might get lucky and bull's-eye another star in a galactic collision.

Re:What Happens To Other Civilizations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22962494)

It seems like catastrophes on an astronomical scale are fairly common; how many intelligent beings have perished as a result?

Answer: 4

Minsc laughs at you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22953466)

...while he pets Boo, his very own miniature giant space hamster.

A Black Hole Near Centauri? (1)

russlar (1122455) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953506)

Cool. They found Londo's soul.

Omega Centauri appears almost as large... (1)

scorp1us (235526) | more than 6 years ago | (#22953946)

Anyone got a pic to illustrate this? I can't really believe a star to be that visibly large.

Re:Omega Centauri appears almost as large... (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954220)

Try looking at the big star that's visible every day.

Re:Omega Centauri appears almost as large... (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954326)

I can't really believe a star to be that visibly large.

Maybe because it is a galaxy (arguably).

Re:Omega Centauri appears almost as large... (2, Informative)

Petrushka (815171) | more than 6 years ago | (#22956526)

Anyone got a pic to illustrate this? I can't really believe a star to be that visibly large.

Voilà [wikipedia.org] . It looks that large, apparently, because it's about 100 light years across.

An even closer one found in Wash.D.C. (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954066)

nuf sed

As big as a full moon? Uh... no. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22954138)

"Seen from a dark rural area in the southern hemisphere, Omega Centauri appears almost as large as the full moon."

I think I would've seen it... most of us would've seen it, if it were that large.

Re:As big as a full moon? Uh... no. (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954320)

It is that big, but has low surface brightness. Collectively, it's about as bright as a fairly dim star (magnitude 3.65 according to the Webb Society Deep-Sky Observer's Handbook). If it were concentrated into a point as a star is, you'd probably barely be able to see it against moderate light pollution.

Re:As big as a full moon? Uh... no. (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955806)

Come to think of it, it probably blends in with the Milky Way. Centaurus has a lot of stuff (nebulas and bright stars like Alpha Centauri) in it and it contains the center of the Milky Way. So Omega Centauri wouldn't stand out as much as if it were in say Ursa Major (the Big Dipper) which is well outside the plane of the Milky Way.

baby galaxy? (1)

evwah (954864) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954578)

how can it be considered a baby galaxy stripped of its outer stars when it's INSIDE our OWN galaxy? perhaps black holes and globular clusters are just an innate feature of all (or most) galaxies already?

Re:baby galaxy? (2, Informative)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 6 years ago | (#22954648)

I imagine the speculation goes something like this: The dwarf galaxy that is now Omega Centauri collided with the Milky Way, which cannibalized most of the dwarf's stars and sent its star-forming nebulae into the intergalactic void. All that was left of the dwarf was a massive globular cluster.

mod uP (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22954816)

to this. For argu3d 3y Eric

Look at this baby... (1)

dovgr (935487) | more than 6 years ago | (#22955436)

40,000 sun masses isn't big. Look at this baby: http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2008/03/18-billion-suns.html [dailygalaxy.com] That black hole is as big as some galaxies, and it is still happily gobbling up additional suns. Good we are nowhere near it.

As big as the full moon? (1)

Velocir (851555) | more than 6 years ago | (#22957340)

I lived in a dark rural area of the Southern Hemisphere, and let me tell you, I have never seen anything in the night sky even approaching the size of the full moon...

Comicbook Guy says . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22963202)

. . . Worst Yoda impression ever!!

Intermediate-Mass Black Hole Found In Omega Centau (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22958814)

And so I said to God, "Where do you last remember seeing them?"

And behold, he found them.

Anomoly ahead, sir ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#22961442)

Navigator : Intermediate-Mass Black Hole Found In Omega Centauri, Captain.

Captain : Science officer ?

Commander Spork : Recommend a 1.7457 microparsec course correction, Captain, to 127.7532 mark 40.2503.
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