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Writers Find Blogging To Be a Stressful Method of Reporting

Soulskill posted about 6 years ago | from the get-your-bloggercise dept.

Media 199

Andrew Feinberg points out a New York Times story about the stress put upon prolific bloggers to maintain a constant flow of content in order to satisfy both consumers and advertisers in the information age. When breaking a story first can generate thousands more page views and clicks, many bloggers are finding themselves chained to their computers, worrying that they'll miss something important if they step away. Quoting: " 'I haven't died yet,' said Michael Arrington, the founder and co-editor of TechCrunch, a popular technology blog. The site has brought in millions in advertising revenue, but there has been a hefty cost. Mr. Arrington says he has gained 30 pounds in the last three years, developed a severe sleeping disorder and turned his home into an office for him and four employees. 'At some point, I'll have a nervous breakdown and be admitted to the hospital, or something else will happen. This is not sustainable,' he said."

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199 comments

Reminds me of Maddox (5, Funny)

SRA8 (859587) | about 6 years ago | (#22979818)

Reminds me of Maddox [xmission.com] . I check his page almost everyday for updates and get angry every time he hasn't posted new content. I only abstain from complaining due to fear of having my email posted!

Re:Reminds me of Maddox (5, Interesting)

PlatyPaul (690601) | about 6 years ago | (#22979978)

Yeah, I know you were being funny (and linking to Maddox which, for the record, is a practice I wholly support), but there's truth to what you're saying.

When you can see the news any moment, you expect the news every moment. When people read newspapers primarily, it was considered acceptable to not be up-to-date until the next day. Then came radio, then TV news, then internet news sites (with full-length articles), then blogs. Now, microblog [wikipedia.org] services like Twitter [twitter.com] are pushing the boundaries of what we consider "up-to-date". When 9-11 happened, I knew people who didn't found out until late afternoon. If the same happened today, it would be a shock if someone hadn't heard within the hour.

I'm not surprised that it's exhausting to be a news blogger; it's hard enough just being a paper reporter. But, then again: those who love to do it will continue to do it.

Re:Reminds me of Maddox (5, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 6 years ago | (#22980388)

I'm not surprised that it's exhausting to be a news blogger; it's hard enough just being a paper reporter.
I think the problem with bloggers is that so many of them are making solo efforts.
More bloggers need a sister site or blog-ring which will is updating during their 'off' hours.

But, then again: those who love to do it will continue to do it.
It's funny that society accepts this excuse for workaholics, but not alcoholics.
It doesn't matter how much you love what you do if it burns you out or ruins your health.

Re:Reminds me of Maddox (5, Insightful)

Original Replica (908688) | about 6 years ago | (#22980774)

I think the problem with bloggers is that so many of them are making solo efforts.

I think the problem is:"The site has brought in millions in advertising revenue...in the last three years...turned his home into an office for him and four employees." Millions of dollars in three years and he's only got four employees and is working out of his home? Get an office and hire some more people you penny pinching fool! Or cash out, put the money in high interest savings, and work part time to supplement the $80k+ a year that $2 million will earn in interest. Look at the decades it takes to gross a few million as a plumber or mechanic or teacher or police officer and then tell me how hard it is to write a blog. Sure it might be more intense it the short term to maintain a highly successful blog, but it it allows you to retire in five years instead of a career of forty years, your sum total of stress and difficulty is going to be far far less in the end.

Re:Reminds me of Maddox (1)

JWeinraub (773433) | about 6 years ago | (#22980636)

Well I was in classes all morning at university when the attacks occurred. There is no central PA system, so nobody had a clue. On the way to my next class is where a janitor told me about what happened. Even then, it didn't register how tragic the events were because it was all second-hand information, so I just went into my next class. I just thought it was like what happened last time, a car bomb blew up, and little damage was really done.

Just as class started, somebody came in screaming the WTC just collapses, my wife works there, I'm going to try to call her!!

The teacher didn't know what to do, so he kept teaching. Half the class was ignoring him, trying to call family and friends, my dad worked near the WTC so I left and called, and thankfully he was all right. But the point is, even with all these technologies, it wouldn't of helped me. Up to the second news is simply stupid really. It can wait until I get to a terminal to read it.

HUMOR - PLZ MOD ACCORDINGLY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980680)

When 9-11 happened, I knew people who didn't found out until late afternoon.
Heh-heh, those dumb Europeans.

OK, here's a suggestion (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22979832)

Get a real job!

Re:OK, here's a suggestion (2, Insightful)

aplusjimages (939458) | about 6 years ago | (#22980598)

So he can be unhappy and get fat working under someone else. Fuck that. This is a real job. He's making a living off of it and has 4 employees. I say get more employees to do the work for you.

fat and rich (3, Insightful)

thegnu (557446) | about 6 years ago | (#22979834)

if he's made millions of dollars, can't he just move to a small island off the coast of Mexico and have young women make him ceviche, bring him beer, and blow him for the rest of his life?

I gained 30 lbs once, and I've since dropped the weight, but I have nothing to show for it. I wonder if we'll get an article here soon about how executives making millions of dollars are stressed out.

Re:fat and rich (4, Informative)

jhoger (519683) | about 6 years ago | (#22979946)

I doubt "millions" refers to earnings. It likely refers to revenue. So after a few "millions" in revenue he has to pay tax and any expenses including salary, benefits of staff. It divides up pretty quick. Plus the owner has been drawing salary and dividends in the meantime.

Plus if you think you can retire on what's leftover there I think that is a bit unrealistic. Say he has 1M leftover. Assuming a risk-free rate of 5% that's $50,000 per year. That used to be a starting California programmer's salary in the late 90's. I don't know about anyone else but I didn't feel rich. You definitely cannot support a family on that supposing he has one. Certainly you won't be renting an island, a chef and prostitutes for $50K/year.

-- John.

Re:fat and rich (4, Insightful)

Peter Cooper (660482) | about 6 years ago | (#22980096)

Assuming a risk-free rate of 5% that's $50,000 per year. That used to be a starting California programmer's salary in the late 90's. I don't know about anyone else but I didn't feel rich. You definitely cannot support a family on that supposing he has one.
You most certainly can, as long as you own your own home (no rent or mortgage to pay) and you live in the 99.9% of the world that isn't Manhattan or SF :) Heck, my family's expenses are far less than that and we pay a mortgage and live well.

The greed behind thinking "I *must* make $100k+ to survive" is one of the many factors sending this industry down the toilet.

No, you are wrong about that, money talks (2, Insightful)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980168)

Assuming a risk-free rate of 5% that's $50,000 per year. That used to be a starting California programmer's salary in the late 90's. I don't know about anyone else but I didn't feel rich. You definitely cannot support a family on that supposing he has one.
You most certainly can, as long as you own your own home (no rent or mortgage to pay) and you live in the 99.9% of the world that isn't Manhattan or SF :) Heck, my family's expenses are far less than that and we pay a mortgage and live well.

The greed behind thinking "I *must* make $100k+ to survive" is one of the many factors sending this industry down the toilet.
Every blogger should want to make $100k. It's good for the internet economy and for the blogging community if bloggers make $100k and up. Doctors, Lawyers, CEO's and other professions make over $100k, and I don't see you saying "It's because those Lawyers make over $100k that the legal system is going down the toilet."

The more money you have coming in, the better off you'll be, it's that simple, and if you want to live cheap, then you probably wont be able to afford private school for your kids, and you might not be able to afford the best medical treatments or the best healthcare plan.

And let's be realistic, if you are single, most of the good women prefer a man who makes over $100k vs a man living in the middle of nowhere making $30k.

What kinda man do most dads tell their daughters to go for? The Lawyer, the Doctor, the CEO, the very sorta man who just happens to be making over $100k.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (5, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 6 years ago | (#22980268)

Doctors, Lawyers, CEO's and other professions make over $100k
Congratulations, we've finally identified that professions with high barriers to entry (intelligence, schooling, well placed parents, etc.) make higher salaries. Blogging requires, um, a keyboard and an ability to type. Oh, sure, there are probably PhDs out there blogging. Okay, okay, I'm kidding - I sincerely doubt it - unless they were useless in their fields to begin with.

I'll agree with you that they should all strive to make six figures, but the reality is that the supply far exceeds the demand, and the talent pool is relatively shallow on average. I know people working just as hard, for just as many hours, usually at multiple jobs, to barely make ends meet. They do it because they don't have the training or ability to perform work that has a higher value in society. Heck, I could make more as a doctor or a lawyer, but I really like being an engineer and I spent my college money to become one.

As for finding a mate, they one's who are primarily interested in the size of your wallet are much more likely to leave you if that wallet ever deflates. I recommend finding one who would marry you if you lost every penny you had in the world. You'll be a lot happier than if you make $100k and had someone who constantly griped about not having enough money to live the way he or she likes.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about 6 years ago | (#22980616)

While I cannot say they don't exist, there certainly are not enough women that don't date and marry for money to go around. Your advice is about as good as telling a kid he should be a pro football player when he grows up. It is possible, and there are lots of examples of it happening, but you are going to end up with a lot more failures than successes if even small percentage of the boys go for it.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (1)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#22980704)

Blogging requires, um, a keyboard and an ability to type.

The "ability to type" is purely optional. Cut-n-paste from [ other blogs | teh InnerToobs | whatever ] seems to be the norm.

Scratch a blogger, find a copyright violator.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (1)

cyphercell (843398) | about 6 years ago | (#22980826)

"Oh, sure, there are probably PhDs out there blogging. Okay, okay, I'm kidding - I sincerely doubt it - unless they were useless in their fields to begin with."

Holy crap, that's a mean thing to say. Maybe, some of these PhDs are useful in their field because they are a blogger. Shit man, almost everyone in the tech industry has an online presence of some sort somewhere. Many of them, I'm sure, consider themselves professional bloggers regardless of the amount of income they might derive from the status.

As for finding a mate, they one's who are primarily interested in the size of your wallet are much more likely to leave you if that wallet ever deflates.

I think this is a little unfair also. I prefer a woman that works, doesn't mean I'll leave her if she CAN'T work. You're talking about something like a trophy wife or a whore (not that either trophy wives or whores are necessarily this brittle). Many women will stick with the man that made the money, simply because he proved himself worthy of that pay and can probably do it again.

Also, if you look into the nature of things, "financial problems" are listed as one of the most common causes of divorce. This means I'll be telling both my kids that they shouldn't settle down until they make about 1.5-3 times local minimum wage (works for my area), and I'll tell them to look for someone that makes about the same, then I'll explain that only one of each couple can be unemployed at a time. It's called redundancy, combined with living below your means and an investment strategy, you can almost live out the American dream or even one-up the damned dream.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (4, Informative)

proxima (165692) | about 6 years ago | (#22980838)

Oh, sure, there are probably PhDs out there blogging. Okay, okay, I'm kidding - I sincerely doubt it - unless they were useless in their fields to begin with.

Actually, there are quite a few PhDs out there blogging. They are hardly "useless in their fields", at least the ones I read; they tend to be some of the more high profile people (and the blogs simply give them an even higher profile). Two cases in point for economics: Greg Mankiw's blog [blogspot.com] and Marginal Revolution [marginalrevolution.com] , a blog by two George Mason profs with occasional guest bloggers.

Blogging is actually fairly amenable to the goal of many academics: to share information and debate about it. The biggest downside that I see is that blogging is fairly time consuming. Mankiw turned off comments to his blog because he didn't have time to moderate them, so his blog became more of a one-way street.

Of course, econ is just one field; I honestly don't know how prevalent blogging is in other fields.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980862)

Oh, sure, there are probably PhDs out there blogging. Okay, okay, I'm kidding - I sincerely doubt it - unless they were useless in their fields to begin with.
http://www.cosmicvariance.com/ [cosmicvariance.com]

No comment...

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980312)

What kinda man do most dads tell their daughters to go for? The Lawyer, the Doctor, the CEO, the very sorta man who just happens to be making over $100k.

Well, these happen to be the same parents that had SEVERAL exorcisms performed on my girlfriend's autistic brother. And on HER for that matter, after she tried to kill herself because everyone told her her entire childhood she was going to hell becuase she would do stuff like go off into the woods and catch lizards when she was at Jesus Camp rather than listen to the propaganda the counselers shit out 5 times daily.

So I try not to stick my junk in anybody who takes advice from those people all too seriously.

Re:No, you are wrong about that, money talks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980334)

"It's because those Lawyers make over $100k that the legal system is going down the toilet."

That was easy!

Re: Lawyers (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | about 6 years ago | (#22980532)

Brilliant.

You're insulting Staples Inc's lawyers.

Watch them send you a friendly warning letter.

(Somewhere, on the 17th floor of the Staples Building. Terrance in Counsel says to himself ...)

Re:fat and rich (1)

Otter (3800) | about 6 years ago | (#22980576)

You most certainly can, as long as you own your own home (no rent or mortgage to pay)...

Well, yes. If someone gave me a free house, I definitely could live on $50K. And if it had a river of money flowing through the yard, I wouldn't have to work at all.

Re:fat and rich (1)

scubamage (727538) | about 6 years ago | (#22980324)

If you have a million dollars and you invest it thats still a pretty hefty sum. In fact, investing it in a stock which gives 1.20 annual dividends will yield more than 90,000$ a year in dividends alone, not to mention regular capital gains. More than enough to live on for the rest of your life and cover your tax obligations.

Re:fat and rich (1)

jhoger (519683) | about 6 years ago | (#22980844)

To get $1.20 dividend, what's the share price of the stock? Let's say the yield is a relatively high 5%. So to yield $90K, that's $90,000/.05 = 1.8M. Hmm... that's pretty close to 2M, not 1M. With the volatility of the stock market I wouldn't count too heavily on capital gains after retirement.

Personally I'd consider the "Money Problem" safely solved at $3M or $4M, and I wouldn't be heavily invested in the stock market. Government treasury bonds more likely. Once I make that $4M in retained earnings I'll be working on open source projects full time :-)

REBUTTAL (2, Funny)

thegnu (557446) | about 6 years ago | (#22980332)

Certainly you won't be renting an island, a chef and prostitutes for $50K/year.

Certainly you've never been to Mexico. ;-)

I never said chefs and I never said hookers. The exchange rate on personal relationship is way better in Mexico anyway.

Re:fat and rich (1)

v1 (525388) | about 6 years ago | (#22980034)

Glad I'm not the only one that questions why this guy is complaining about a few tradeoffs he had to make to become a millionaire.

So all I need to do to become a millionaire is to lose some sleep, gain a little weight, and use my home as an office for a few years? Hey, I'm cool with that.

My next question would be, so... if you've made a ton of money, and are starting to feel the backlash, why haven't you handed the torch off to someone else to go retire somewhere and enjoy a relaxing, stress-free early retirement?

Let me get this straight... (4, Insightful)

Poromenos1 (830658) | about 6 years ago | (#22979858)

The site has brought in millions in advertising revenue, but there has been a hefty cost.
Bloggers are complaining that making millions wasn't as easy as they'd like? Cry me a river...

Re:Let me get this straight... (3, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | about 6 years ago | (#22979892)

Bloggers are complaining that making millions wasn't as easy as they'd like? Cry me a river...

I don't think that's the point they are trying to make. I think that what they were trying to get across was that blogging has become just as difficult to keep up with as traditional media but instead of having a team of researchers working around the clock to handle news feeds, fact checking, etc, you have less than a handful of people doing the work that used to take many many more.

Re:Let me get this straight... (1, Informative)

phyrz (669413) | about 6 years ago | (#22979954)

if you are making millions, rent an office and hire some reporters. no sympathy here.

Re:Let me get this straight... (1)

liquidpele (663430) | about 6 years ago | (#22979956)

And I think the grandparent's point was that if they are making millions, they can hire that "many many more" you speak of... If they want to keep a tight control and do all the work themselves, then it's their own fault! Taco doesn't check and post every story on slashdot because he knows that's not possible, he has however many people he needs to help him.

Re:Let me get this straight... (2, Insightful)

kv9 (697238) | about 6 years ago | (#22979968)

this is what happens when normal people start pretending to be geeks. the drama starts. I expect a FOX special report on this pretty soon. "Blogs: The Silent Killers of People Prone to Getting Fat After Sitting on Their Ass for a Long Time"

I don't hear the Slashdot crew whining about reporting news for over 10 years. I guess they really like what they really do and don't feel the need for guilttripping themselves

Re:Let me get this straight... (2, Insightful)

drsquare (530038) | about 6 years ago | (#22980516)

But bloggers copy most of their news from elsewhere anyway, so why do they need all those people?

Re:Let me get this straight... (2, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#22980720)

But bloggers copy most of their news from elsewhere anyway, so why do they need all those people?

Because one blogger accidently copied his own shit and disappeared in an infinite loop.

Re:Let me get this straight... (3, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 6 years ago | (#22979970)

For that kind of money, he can rent an office, hire a staff (sounds like he has one), and be a real small business owner. Heck, most small companies (i.e. 5 employees) would kill to have a seven figure annual budget, and without physical inventory to turn, no less! Even more, blogging can be run from an $8/SF office space in a small town. Sure, there's lot of time and stress involved - welcome to the world of small businesses. You're growing or you're dying.

I'd like to feel bad for him, but - as a small business owner with 5 employees and noticeably less than a million dollars in annual revenue - I just can't seem to get the tears going while I browse the 'net at lunch from my office.

Re:Let me get this straight... (1)

paintswithcolour (929954) | about 6 years ago | (#22980260)

If he hires more staff, gets a proper office etc. does he still get to be called a blogger? Or a news agency?

It sounds a little like blogging is a commercial sham, they know its a bubble market, and live in terror that someone else might find out.

He's got it easy. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980106)

Mike's got it easy. I own a small business, with six employees. We do Flash games, web development, and other custom software projects. On Friday I wasn't feeling so well. A bit of the flu, I suppose. Regardless of my health, our work must go on. So there the entire company was, sitting in our 10x10 meeting room with two representatives from one of our larger clients. In short, I shit my pants. It wasn't a solid shit, either. It was diarrhea that ended up dripping down my legs onto my shoes, and then onto the carpet. And in a meeting room as small as ours, packed with nine people in it, it isn't an enjoyable experience. Needless to say, the reps from our client were not impressed. And tomorrow I get to deal with the repercussions of the whole ordeal. Since I clean our office (we can't afford a cleaning firm), I'll probably get to clean up the now-dried stool that has no doubt been sitting there all weekend.

Re:Let me get this straight... (1)

Reziac (43301) | about 6 years ago | (#22980366)

Which makes it sound sortof like spammers' similar complaints, except in this case, readers seek the spam rather than having it thrust upon them!

Also in the News (5, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | about 6 years ago | (#22979886)

Writers Find Blogging To Be a Stressful Method of Reporting
Readers Find Blogging To Be Most Ridiculous Form of Reporting News Yet

Seriously, does anyone get their 'news' from blogs? Granted they can be interesting and helpful, they are often written with no editing and read more like "On the Road" than The New York Times.

Congratulations on developing income through traffic but it pains me to see people use this as a way to stay informed.

If you never leave your basement you're not reporting, you're aggregating or spinning.

Re:Also in the News (1)

Robert1 (513674) | about 6 years ago | (#22980030)

I don't know anyone who gets their news from blogs. Not a soul. The only times I've ever seen people read them is when actual journalists from established news organizations are at some technology conference of some sort and post as it happens. I can't imagine using a blog or even several blogs as a replacement for the multitude of legitimate news organizations.

Re:Also in the News (3, Interesting)

value_added (719364) | about 6 years ago | (#22980052)

Seriously, does anyone get their 'news' from blogs?

I'm sure a small minority do (in the same way that some get their news from the John Stewart Show), but the real question is why those chanting Old Media is Dead haven't yet noticed that news comes from, and will continue to come from professional reporters. You know, the folks that took the time to study journalism and are typically employed by newspapers, news organisations, and a dwindling number of media companies that can still afford them?

Granted they can be interesting and helpful ...

Indeed. They do have a contribution to make, but usually that's in the form of commentary, added background or trivia, or even some personal insight. At their best they also provide links to some authoritive reporting, and at worst, incestuous links to other blogs.

Bloggers complaining about stress should visit a real news room. They might discover that the act of reporting (or the writing part of it) is a lot harder than sitting in a Starbucks with a Mac waxing poetic while contemplating current events.

Re:Also in the News (1)

mmurphy000 (556983) | about 6 years ago | (#22980426)

Granted they can be interesting and helpful, they are often written with no editing and read more like "On the Road" than The New York Times.

On a related note, you're missing a "but" or "however" after the comma, highlighting that even the best of us have the occasional problem with grammar. You do get bonus points for citing Kerouac and for capitalizing "The" in "The New York Times" — up until researching it just now, I wouldn't have guessed that "The" is actually part of the newspaper's name.

If you never leave your basement you're not reporting, you're aggregating or spinning.

Or, perhaps, just maybe, adding some value. For example, one could be analyzing, to augment some lightly-sourced corporate (a.k.a., "mainstream") media piece with additional data to augment or refute the original. Or one could be researching new material from "your basement" via interviews, polls, and the like. And, of course, one person's "spinning" is another person's "displaying another perspective" — personally, I tend to reserve the term "spinning" when it involves lying or masquerading the truth.

Do all bloggers do this? Heck no, no more than do all Slashdot posters. It varies by blogger and by subject matter. For that matter, not all #$*($#)@ reporters do a quality job. Too much stuff winds up in print or on TV that is merely regurgitating a PR piece or other slanted bit of original writing.

All sources of information, whether from corporate-backed outlets or from individual bloggers, come as both wheat and chaff. What the world needs is more experience in telling one from the other.

Re:Also in the News (1)

schnikies79 (788746) | about 6 years ago | (#22980474)

It's all in the ratios.

Lets say for argument sake that 1 in every 4 professional reporters are crap, that might be a little low (lets even say it's 1 out of 2) but I'm just making a point. With blogs, about 1 in 50 is half-way solid and the rest is complete and absolute garbage. It's probably more along the lines of 1 in 100.

The signal to noise ratio makes blogs worthless. Even if you know where to look.

Kettle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980682)

Seriously, does anyone get their 'news' from blogs?
Didn't you just get this 'news' from Slashdot, Rob Malda's blog?
 

Why not just stop? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22979888)

If it's that big a problem just stop and get a normal job, or, if you've really made millions in revenue pay someone to do the stressful stuff for you.

Is it really so hard? Have I missed something here?

there's only one version of the truth.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22979902)

& it's usually not a long story, or physically/emotionally damaging to tell. let yOUR conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071229/ap_on_sc/ye_climate_records;_ylt=A0WTcVgednZHP2gB9wms0NUE [yahoo.com]
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080108/ts_alt_afp/ushealthfrancemortality;_ylt=A9G_RngbRIVHsYAAfCas0NUE [yahoo.com]
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A [nytimes.com]

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying [google.com]

dictator style micro management has never worked (for very long). it's an illness. tie that with life0cidal aggression & softwar gangster style bullying, & what do we have? a greed/fear/ego based recipe for disaster. meanwhile, you can help to stop the bleeding (loss of life & limb);

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/28/vermont.banning.bush.ap/index.html [cnn.com]

the bleeding must be stopped before any healing can begin. jailing a couple of corepirate nazi hired goons would send a clear message to the rest of the world from US. any truthful look at the 'scorecard' would reveal that we are a society in decline/deep doo-doo, despite all of the scriptdead pr ?firm? generated drum beating & flag waving propaganda that we are constantly bombarded with. is it time to get real yet? please consider carefully ALL of yOUR other 'options'. the creators will prevail. as it has always been.

corepirate nazi execrable costs outweigh benefits
(Score:-)mynuts won, the king is a fink)
by ourselves on everyday 24/7

as there are no benefits, just more&more death/debt & disruption. fortunately there's an 'army' of light bringers, coming yOUR way. the little ones/innocents must/will be protected. after the big flash, ALL of yOUR imaginary 'borders' may blur a bit? for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available. 'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet, & by your behaviors. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable. some of US should consider ourselves somewhat fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate. it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc.... as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis. concern about the course of events that will occur should the life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order. 'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continue on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US. gov. bush denies health care for the little ones;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html [cnn.com]

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html [cnn.com]

& pretending that it isn't happening here;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3086937.ece [timesonline.co.uk]
all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

(yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles. talk about reverse polarity;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece [timesonline.co.uk]

Bloggers need better technology (2, Interesting)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22979918)

Bloggers need both better technologies and better business models so that people can make a decent income blogging. It's a decent career but there's just not enough money in it yet to make it worth the pain and stress. We need alternative business models to increase the value of the blogsphere. Anyone got ideas?

I do: (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 6 years ago | (#22979980)

Learn to live on less than a million dollars a year. That would free up some of that income to capitalize the infrastructure.

You're a naive idealist. (1)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980232)

Learn to live on less than a million dollars a year. That would free up some of that income to capitalize the infrastructure.
The global economy is never going to be fair or become more efficient. The strong(rich) always exploit the weak (poor), and the only thing you can do is make sure you aren't the weak(poor) by trying to make as much money as you can make in your lifetime.

I don't know about you, but I want my time to be worth the absolute maximum amount of money possible. I value my time, and I love my life, and I don't want to waste my time and my life making somebody else rich. I want to make myself rich.

And women prefer powerful men. If you want a "good" woman, assuming you don't have one already, having money and power helps, unless you plan on being a fireman, cop, or work for a non profit and then perhaps you get women through status. But the simple fact is, the more money you make, the better able you are to protect your wife and kids.

Proof? Look at Africa, no money, and as a result no security. Look at this country, look in the ghettos and trailer parks, no money = no security. The more money you have, the more security you have, because society decides our worth by our salary.

Don't you think you're worth more than this?

Re:You're a naive idealist. (1)

CableModemSniper (556285) | about 6 years ago | (#22980320)

So, um don't be a blogger. Get into a profession where you can make a ton of money and not be tearing your hair out from stress. If the goal is to get money, don't lock yourself in a box by saying, "I have to be a blogger, so to make sure I make oodles of cash safely, let's fix blogging."

Re:You're a naive idealist. (1)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980700)


Well yeah if you don't like being a blogger and can do something else, then why blog?

But if you like being a blogger, and it's the main thing you are good at, then you better fight to protect your turf.

Re:You're a naive idealist. (1)

Miseph (979059) | about 6 years ago | (#22980714)

Hate to burst your bubble, but no woman I would describe as "good" is more attracted to a guy with money than, say, a guy who's likeable and isn't a douche. At least I give you credit for observing the warped nature of our social values, though I'm perplexed by your apparent embrace of it and exhortations to participate in a clearly unfair system.

To each his own, I suppose.

Re:You're a naive idealist. (2, Interesting)

esper (11644) | about 6 years ago | (#22980734)

I want my time to be worth the absolute maximum amount of money possible. I value my time, and I love my life, and I don't want to waste my time and my life making somebody else rich.

I'm with you so far...

I want to make myself rich. ...but we diverge here.

I want my time to be worth as much as possible not so I can be rich, but so I can live comfortably while selling as little of my time as possible because "I value my time... and I don't want to waste my time and my life".

Given the opportunity to work as much as I like at $2500/day (and, yes, I have worked at that rate, though not consistently), I would prefer to work 40 days/year and make $100k rather than 5 days/week every week to get the $650k or so that works out to. I can live more than comfortably on $100k, including plenty of room for saving for leaner times, so why waste my time and my life to build up a pile of cash that I have no actual use for?

Re:Bloggers need better technology (2, Insightful)

anomalous cohort (704239) | about 6 years ago | (#22980142)

It's a decent career but there's just not enough money in it yet to make it worth the pain and stress. We need alternative business models to increase the value of the blogsphere. Anyone got ideas?

Content may be king but in this world, that content is user supplied and nearly anonymous. In order to make money off of content, you either have to be in the distribution side or form a cult of personality. In other words, build brand. In viral fashion, I have blogged [blogspot.com] on this.

The Slashdot Model (1)

francisstp (1137345) | about 6 years ago | (#22980272)

We need alternative business models to increase the value of the blogsphere. Anyone got ideas?
You may not realize it but you're contributing to one of these alternative models right here!

Re:Bloggers need better technology (1)

philicorda (544449) | about 6 years ago | (#22980446)

Why don't they do their blogging live, in the form of public speeches?

Then they could charge people to attend, and also make money off merchandise and selling drinks and snacks.

I mean, people expect other content producers to do this, why not bloggers as well?

i hate to repeat the above posts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22979928)

Do something else. There is NO REASON to kill yourself over something that most people have no respect for anyway.

Even most people with internet don't read/trust/use blogs, including myself.

Seriously, fucking do something else.

8 solutions (2, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#22979932)

he has gained 30 pounds in the last three years, ,,, This is not sustainable,'

[_] Go hunting with Dick Cheney - problem solved!
[_] Dude! If you've gained 30 pounds, sustenance isn't your problem. More like "sustenance abuse."
[_] Get a bigger chair - it'll sustain your additional weight.
[_] Get up and go for a walk. There's a reason the dot-com boom had lots of dogs in offices - it forced people to get up and walk their dogs! This got them away from their computers for a bit, so that when they came back, they were refreshed, and more productive.
[_] Set your site up as Yahoo!'s "ugly sister" for when Microsoft is looking for more "sustenance".
[_] More typeing and less eating.
[_] Move to a real office instead of working from home - or LOCK THE FRIDGE!
[_] Profit from it - start a blog about how blogging makes you fat. Lots of fat people will then take up blogging, as their "excuse" for being fattarded wankers.

Some cheese with that whine? (2, Insightful)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 6 years ago | (#22979988)

Bloggers talk incessantly about blogging... News at 11:00!

I get a bit tired of people who complain about their job or life, yet never take the steps necessary to alleviate the cause of said complaints. It's your life. Take some responsibility for it. Exercise more. Take a well-needed vacation (and leave the damn computer at home)! Spend some quality time with family and friends. I'll bet that when you look back at your life, you won't regret spending a bit less time at the computer, staring at updating blogs.

I also tire of how certain media industries talk about themselves as relevant news... I see this happen in the mainstream media all the time (stories about the media), and I find it somewhat annoying. Blogging has the same sort of problem - many bloggers talk incessantly about blogging and other bloggers, since that's the topic they know best.

got enough adverts there, bud? (4, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | about 6 years ago | (#22979998)

Close to 50% of the page space is ads. Very slow loading ads. And annoying javascript popups. Just start moving your mouse around and hover-triggered popups start going off like landmines.

How can people stand to go there on a regular basis?

Re:got enough adverts there, bud? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980266)

Close to 50% of the page space is ads. Very slow loading ads. And annoying javascript popups. Just start moving your mouse around and hover-triggered popups start going off like landmines.

How can people stand to go there on a regular basis?

Adblock Plus and NoScript, perhaps?

Re:got enough adverts there, bud? (1)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#22980296)

Close to 50% of the page space is ads. Very slow loading ads. And annoying javascript popups. Just start moving your mouse around and hover-triggered popups start going off like landmines.

How can people stand to go there on a regular basis?

Try this as a simple answer - people don't - or if they do, they don't go back; thus most of his traffic is probably bots or other bloggers doing a circle jerk.

Re:got enough adverts there, bud? (1)

Reziac (43301) | about 6 years ago | (#22980392)

"Bloggers have learned all they know from reading one another."

(Apologies to Jack Vance... the original was about critics, but bloggers are much the same thing.)

Telecommuting is good for business, and us. (1)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980006)


Overall I look forward to making money by telecommuting and working from home. Nothing good comes from getting dressed up each morning to go to work and be around people I probably don't care to be around in the first place.

However, blogging has to actually be making people rich. If a site is bringing in millions in ad revenue, and the individual blogger guy is making under $100,000 a year, of course somethings wrong with that.

Now, if you make $100,000 a year working from your home, yes it's worth having a nervous breakdown over, but if you make $30,000, then hell no it's not.

Ideally, bloggers should just get a portion of the ad revenue and get rich along with the website. Either way, if this guy gained 30lbs it's not because of his career, it's because he refused to exercise and eat right.

If a guy gains 30lbs, and is psychologically stressed out, maybe this guy should become a fireman or construction worker where he can do hard labor every day. And if being a blogger is oo stressful maybe he should go to Iraq and fight for his country.

Seriously, this article looks to me like a lot of whining. Most people have more difficult jobs than his job. Now, my post is not all about insulting the person in the article. I'll explain my intentions below:

A. Increase the value of bloggers and the telecommuting community (we should all be able to work from home!)

B. Maximize the amount of money telecommuters can make.

I think these should be the two goals of the telecommuting community. Maximize growth and income potential, and increase the value of telecommuting to society overall.

Getting dressed up to go to work should be a thing of the past. It's better for roads, it's better for the environment. It's healthier, because the average person can be more productive from home than they are going to work, because at work someone can have the flu and infect everyone.

If you are a libertarian, telecommuting increases your sense of freedom and thus your quality of life. Why do you want to be micromanaged by a boss? The main two concerns are maximizing the amount of money which bloggers make (through technological design, activism, bloggers unions and guilds etc), and maximizing the overall value of the blogsphere and of industries which support the telecommuter community.

Re:Telecommuting is good for business, and us. (1)

iamhigh (1252742) | about 6 years ago | (#22980252)

Really? It seems that would increase the cost of moving the cylinders from workcenter to workcenter... unless we bought those $1M machines for each workcenter for each employee's house.

Not all of use produce things so easily transported.

And these are airplane cylinders... not cars. So ease up on the circular logic.

I'm not talking about building airplanes. (1)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980398)


But even in the case of building airplanes, the design could be done at home.

Re:Telecommuting is good for business, and us. (4, Interesting)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#22980336)

Just one minor nit to pick:

Getting dressed up to go to work should be a thing of the past.

Part of the problem with many people working from home is it "doesn't feel like work", so they slack off. They work in their kitchen instead of a dedicated room / home office. They use the same computer for work and fun. They slack off on their personal appearance. Etc. Etc.

Getting dressed instead of sitting in your undies is part of the mental preparation for "Now I'm going to work!" I don't know how many times, when I was working from home, people would call and assume that I had all this "free time". I'd usually let them talk for a minute or two, but if it went longer, I'd tell them to call me at night - I'm working and don't want to "lose the momentum | thought | zone | whatever".

They'd be miffed the first few times.

Re:Telecommuting is good for business, and us. (1)

cbart387 (1192883) | about 6 years ago | (#22980580)

That makes sense, I can see how it would be harder to get 'into the zone' otherwise.

Telecommuting (at least for me) got tedious, doing it on a regular basis. Two summers ago I telecommuted from home for my undergraduate job. It was nice the first couple weeks but it gets old really fast not having coworkers to chitchat, go for coffee runs, etc. It's nice in short spurts, especially if you have to hunker down to get a project done. I wouldn't like doing so as my regular job.

Re:Telecommuting is good for business, and us. (1)

schnikies79 (788746) | about 6 years ago | (#22980436)

First off, I'm a chemist and don't have access to $500k worth of equipment at home, so I couldn't telecommute if I wanted to, but even if I could, why?

I don't want to be at home all the time. I like to leave the house and I'm generally not productive when at home. I go to work to be at work and I go home to be at home. I would rather never mix the two.

This is a typical case of self control (3, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 6 years ago | (#22980084)

If you are a blogger, set your hours. Sure, you'll violate them once in a while (I'm posting from work on a Sunday...I'm in a crunch time in my business - it happens). But seriously, if you don't post for 14 hours a day, the world will not stop. Provided that you have people to do the shifts to keep the information flowing, people will not abandon the blog forever. Taco doesn't spend 20 hours a day posting dupes - he's hired people to do that.

This isn't really about blogging, it's about small business. Small, one man shops really are a drain on your life. You fear that if you close too early or open too late you'll miss that one big customer. Until you get big enough to spread the load, that will be the case.

A note for bloggers - you might want to move. There were two in that story - one in SF, one (I believe) in NY. Note: you're bloggers, nobody cares where you live and you can source from anywhere in the (US/NA/World). Based on the "all day and night at the keyboard" comments, these folks aren't getting their inside scoops from wandering the streets of the big technology cities. Might I suggest somewhere inexpensive, somewhere relaxing from which to blog. Make it within 100 miles of an airline hub if you do a lot of conferences. Office space in small towns is often $8/SF (per year) or less, and really good housing is actually affordable on 40k-50k/yr.

Naive thinking. (1)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980372)

If you are a blogger, set your hours. Sure, you'll violate them once in a while (I'm posting from work on a Sunday...I'm in a crunch time in my business - it happens). But seriously, if you don't post for 14 hours a day, the world will not stop. Provided that you have people to do the shifts to keep the information flowing, people will not abandon the blog forever. Taco doesn't spend 20 hours a day posting dupes - he's hired people to do that.

This isn't really about blogging, it's about small business. Small, one man shops really are a drain on your life. You fear that if you close too early or open too late you'll miss that one big customer. Until you get big enough to spread the load, that will be the case.

A note for bloggers - you might want to move. There were two in that story - one in SF, one (I believe) in NY. Note: you're bloggers, nobody cares where you live and you can source from anywhere in the (US/NA/World). Based on the "all day and night at the keyboard" comments, these folks aren't getting their inside scoops from wandering the streets of the big technology cities. Might I suggest somewhere inexpensive, somewhere relaxing from which to blog. Make it within 100 miles of an airline hub if you do a lot of conferences. Office space in small towns is often $8/SF (per year) or less, and really good housing is actually affordable on 40k-50k/yr.
If they move out of San Francisco and out of New York, then there will be less women to choose from, from which to marry. What if they like the women in San Fran and New York?

I'm sure most bloggers wont be marrying professional women but if you actually WANT to, then the big city is the place to find these women and this could be the main reason some of them live in these places.

I don't rule out the possibility that the guy living in San Francisco could be gay, but once again, you completely ignore the fact that there's a very large concentration of physically attractive single women in these areas that probably wont be found in the less densely populated places like North Dakota, Idaho, or Montana.

The problem with living in small towns is, it's hard as hell to find a mate in a small town. Thats the main reason most people leave the small town for the big city in the first place.

Your post wasn't completely wrong, you are right on it being more efficient to live and work in a small town. And if these guys have wives, maybe they can do that for a few years. But most people aren't going to want to find a wife in Idaho, and most people aren't going to want to raise kids in Idaho either.

You must have a small penis. (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 6 years ago | (#22980444)

I don't mean that in a negative way - there's nothing wrong with a small penis. But you seem very concerned about finding a woman who will have you, and you seem to feel that cash is the only way to "score" a good woman.

And you don't need to move to Bumfuck, Idaho. Find a city with 50k-200k people and you'll have a pretty good selection, but still be where you can afford to live on a 5 figure salary. The outskirts of Charlotte or Greensboro, NC come to mind, or even larger like some of the 'burbs around Raleigh. Even better, and closer to my 50-200k number, find a town with a major college. Blacksburg and Charlottesville, VA, or Amhearst, MA, or Ithaca, NY. All small towns with great primary and secondary schools, affordable housing, and lots of hot chicks.

Money talks. (1)

elucido (870205) | about 6 years ago | (#22980730)

I don't mean that in a negative way - there's nothing wrong with a small penis. But you seem very concerned about finding a woman who will have you, and you seem to feel that cash is the only way to "score" a good woman.

And you don't need to move to Bumfuck, Idaho. Find a city with 50k-200k people and you'll have a pretty good selection, but still be where you can afford to live on a 5 figure salary. The outskirts of Charlotte or Greensboro, NC come to mind, or even larger like some of the 'burbs around Raleigh. Even better, and closer to my 50-200k number, find a town with a major college. Blacksburg and Charlottesville, VA, or Amhearst, MA, or Ithaca, NY. All small towns with great primary and secondary schools, affordable housing, and lots of hot chicks.
It's not penis size that counts, it's wallet size.
Women by nature are more attracted to powerful men.

And it's a fact that there aren't a lot of good women on earth, so if you go to a small city you'll just have less of a selection of a scarce commodity.

Would you go to the desert in search of water? No of course not. College towns are a good option, but college towns are near big cities, and most people don't stay in them beyond 4 years.

Re: /. work shifts (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | about 6 years ago | (#22980690)


Actually, I've mapped the few hours of story arcs on /. a few times, and several of the editors have accounted for 18 hour spans of news.

People with "Programmer's Ethic" work well from home, but other posts are correct that the types of people who subconsciously need the flow of people around them begin to drift when working from home.

This is where non-time metrics can sometimes be fun if they're not too tightly calibrated. "I don't care what you do with your time so long as you post 137 stories on /. per week".

If that means a 3 hour break on Tuesday from 11 AM till 2Pm with a large pizza, large Hunan Chicken, 4 Liters of Dew, a bowl of wings, and 7 friends, go for it. Then after the "American Siesta" you can go back to work from 2PM until midnight.

Blogging is really starting to allow non-traditional working hours. It might take a couple decades more, but eventually the Brick&Mortar world will begin to notice that it's no fun anymore for every business to be open only from 8:15AM until 4PM if their customers are working from 6:45AM until 4:45PM.

work shifts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980130)

This is not sustainable

Not sustainable? I beg to differ.

The companies have been racing to produce as much as possible in the shortest time possible since the beginning of industrial revolution.

First mover advantage is obviously very significant in this industry of information delivery. Which is why you need to build in redundancy and share workload as well as rewards with others.

Simple but effective solution: divide the day into shifts, and have people work several shifts to overlap and update those just beginning their work day.

This is why you have lots of writers at newspapers (1)

HockeyPuck (141947) | about 6 years ago | (#22980140)

DUH.

Blog - 1 man newspaper.

So of course if he and his 4 man team aren't writing content people aren't getting anything new. Traditional printed material (and their online versions) have lots of authors writing so if one writer (say in sports) goes on vacation someone else is there to tell me the Yankee's blew it again.

I also wonder what percentage of bloggers actually do field research (ie: get away from the computer) rather than using online only resources.

So what else is new? (3, Insightful)

plopez (54068) | about 6 years ago | (#22980214)

A number of professions live under the 'publish or perish' gun. University professors, freelance journalists, freelance photographers, ad copy writers, script writes etc.

Nothing to see here, move along....

What nonsense (1)

gelfling (6534) | about 6 years ago | (#22980226)

95% of all 'professional' blogging is bloggers quoting and pasting other bloggers, to either agree violently with them or talk shit about them.

Re:What nonsense (1)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#22980406)

95% of all 'professional' blogging is bloggers quoting and pasting other bloggers, to either agree violently with them or talk shit about them.

And the other 5% is "google is ..."

Get them together and get ready to puke. I have NEVER seen a group more obsessed over PageRank, google, and "recognition".

Re:What nonsense (1)

Reziac (43301) | about 6 years ago | (#22980418)

And since they all do so incessently, there is SO much shit to quote and paste, the work never ends!!

Re:What nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980804)

I've been to a few political conferences in DC that gave out "blogger" passes -- mostly to a bunch of snot-nosed little brats wo didn't look as if they had ever followed a train of throught through to its logical conclusion in their lives.

How "blogging" has now become a "job," when in the past people with livejournals were either goth, gay, or something else that entitled them to an ass-kicking by the same people who now read this shit is beyond me.

Bloggs need to die.

I'm shocked (2, Insightful)

Yvanhoe (564877) | about 6 years ago | (#22980274)

You mean that gaining money through blogging means it has to be stressful like a real work ? really I'm shocked, I thought it was free money !

30 pounds = 13.6 Kg (1)

Cinnaman (954100) | about 6 years ago | (#22980430)

That's 13.6 kilos for those in metric countries.

A revolving team of reporters contributing to a blog would probably alleviate the stress. Even just maintaining a personal blog can be stressful if you feel that you (alone) should post regularly to maintain other's interest.

Hasn't programming been like this forever ? :-D (1)

OneInEveryCrowd (62120) | about 6 years ago | (#22980448)

"They work long hours, often to exhaustion."

When I got started in programming in the late 1970's I used to hear similar things about the health risks. A programmer who worked across the street had to be hospitalized for a nervous breakdown after many months of 100 hour (no paid overtime) work weeks. I went to a party with my coworkers where their wives cornered me in the kitchen and told me to "get out now".

Since it looks like computer related jobs haven't changed a bit in 30 years, I'll bet the next New York Times article on the subject concerns blogging ruining marriages.

Wow shock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980470)

Person who runs his own company has been found to have earned much but worked his ass off and has become fat and with little spare time.

More news at 11.

Bit Melodramatic? (2, Insightful)

ek-sistence (1244630) | about 6 years ago | (#22980490)

The first few paragraphs of this article are so melodramatic that you might be able to convince me it came from The Onion rather than the NY Times. Was the writer bored; felt like being a little dramatic? Did all the editors have the day off? Either way, nice job, NY Times, you've at least amused me.

Ever heard of shifts? (1)

jonadab (583620) | about 6 years ago | (#22980540)

There's this thing called a 'shift'. I think it was a military invention originally, but the principle carries over well to other industries. It's really cool. Basically, you get at least three people, and you *take turns* being the one who has to be available at all times -- for a few (usually eight) hours at a time, and then the next guy relieves you and takes the next shift, and you're free to go home and sleep and stuff.

It seems to be really catching on. Might be the next big thing. You should try it.

Stop mangling submissions. (5, Insightful)

afeinberg (9848) | about 6 years ago | (#22980590)

Dear Slashdot Editors,

Please stop mangling my submissions. I did not submit to you the NYT article. I submitted the commentary to the NYT article which I wrote as a tech/public policy blogger reacting to the story. I find the way you guys now strip out submitters content and simply link to the "mainstream" article insulting and really makes me want to contribute to the discussions less and less. Why is my contribution less valuable than the NYT article? I think my commentary as an informed reader adds much to the discussion, and could have done quite a bit to improve the quality of comments here.

Is there a reason you no longer link to other people's submissions, only their mainstream media material?

I have been a Slashdot reader since 1998-1999. I read less and less. This is why. While I took the time to format, edit, and submit a story containing links to both the original NYT article and my own commentary [capitolvalley.net] you found it OK to strip out my entire submission and bury it in your worthless "firehose" and instead simply use me as a tip-off instead of a contributor to a community which I have been on for over ten years. Check my UID.

Is original (ie, not from "news sites") content no longer relevant on Slashdot? Hey Malda, Bates? Remember me? When did your site become a news aggregator instead of a place to discuss ideas, not just rehash articles from mainstream press? I don't feel like part of a community right now. I feel like I'm doing work just so someone else can take the credit. I spent a good amount of time writing that post that I linked you to, and you all but ignored it.

Why?

Andrew Feinberg
Angry Slashdot Veteran

Re:Stop mangling submissions. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980842)

I think they're trying to avoid having to tag articles "ohshititsroland." (Only with 'roland' replaced with someone else's name)

Guilt (1)

kylemonger (686302) | about 6 years ago | (#22980686)

Maybe it's not work-related stress, maybe it's guilt. Guilt that's he's making a lot of money from merely regurgitating news about people who are actually doing productive work.

Or maybe it's fear, the fear of a man soaring over a city a year and a day after he first learned that he could fly. Fear that the ability will disappear as mysteriously as it appeared, and without warning he will plummet to his death.

Ofrost pist (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#22980744)

knows for sure what and other party stand anymore, I know it sux0rs, market. Theref0re baatled in court,
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