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Paraguay Telco Hijacks DNS Before Elections

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the can't-say-that-here dept.

Security 150

MrJones writes "In Paraguay we are at T-9 days to national elections. The ruling party has been in power for nearly 61 years (including more than 30 years of dictatorship). Now the state-run ADSL company is hijacking the DNS nationwide of a site that denounces the corruption in the party."

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yet.... (1, Offtopic)

the_real_valaki (1174903) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048266)

...another reason to hijack the olympic torch...

Re:yet.... (1)

the_real_valaki (1174903) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048542)

ok.. i admit, it wasn't funny.

No oil (5, Funny)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048286)

Do you have oil? If you do, then this corruption is a worldwide tragedy which must be stopped, we'll send troops^Wobservers right away.

Re:No oil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048320)

Hilarious! Mod Parent Up!

Re:No oil (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048372)

Actually, the US is about to open a military base in Paraguay, to have a tight leash on Bolivian oil fields, I guess.

So, I think we will side with the ruling party in this one.

Re:No oil (1)

Kenrod (188428) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048646)

"Bolivian Oil Fields". Right.

I suspect they are there to assist with anti-terrorism activities in the the remote tri-border area in southern Brazil.

http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/pdf-files/TerrOrgCrime_TBA.pdf [loc.gov]
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0PBZ/is_5_84/ai_n7069238 [findarticles.com]

Re:No oil (2, Insightful)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048692)

never heard of Tarija, Bolivia, right?

Re:No oil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049820)

No, never. Wikipedia is not helping [wikipedia.org] . What are you trying to say.

Re:No oil (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23050010)

What heck of mixed coke you using? We are not opening any kind of military base in Paraguay, amigo. We have Columbia already. The rest of South America, besides Brazil and Venezuela, is just a big slum, and we don't care about you (ok, we have to deport, every year, a couple thousands of you that will come over here to clean our toilets).
If we have any problem there, we can ask Brazil to solve that for us, as they are also having issues with a lot of illegal immigrants trying to cross their borders. Thanks God we have only Mexico, Brazil got all of you around them and they are becoming the rich cousin next-door. Bad luck, Brazil...

Re:No oil (1)

shadowofwind (1209890) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048466)

Do you have oil? If you do, then this corruption is a worldwide tragedy which must be stopped, we'll send troops^Wobservers right away.
Argentine oil is much, much more important to the US interests than Iraq's, and the US has not reacted in such a manner to events there.

Re:No oil (0, Offtopic)

w000t (1141427) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048656)

WTF are you talking about? what oil? what events?

Re:No oil (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048724)

the oil stolen by Spain with the disgustingly corrupt sale of YPF (Argentina's state-owned oil company) to Repsol (Spain's oil monopoly) in the 90's

Re:No oil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048908)

Repsol is not a monopoly for about 15 years now.
And the sale is more recent than you claim.

Please check your facts before posting.

Re:No oil (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049376)

Repsol is a monopoly, I don't care what you claim. Also the sale is from 1999, so it's in the 90s. Fuck you, anonymous :)

Re:No oil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23050022)

Would either of you care to cite some facts for the monopoly / not monopoly thing? Or are there none since you just started cussing instead?

Re:No oil (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048818)

WTF are you talking about? what oil? what events?
Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

They should host the site on high-profile domains (5, Informative)

mysidia (191772) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048290)

I.E. Google pages

And put the site in many places so it isn't as easy to silence.

While hijacking DNS of a small domain may go unnoticed

Hijacking say Google's or Yahoo's DNS could possibly be highly noticed by the citizens.

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048400)

Wonder if Google Pages was tried by anyone behind the Great Firewall of China?

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (1)

KillerBob (217953) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048608)

IIRC, the Google.cn site de-lists sites not approved by the great firewall. From that point, it wouldn't be difficult to add the non-Google.cn versions of Google to the firewall's block list, no?

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (2, Interesting)

jmnormand (941909) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048578)

might also catch googles attention, who happens to have a market cap 400% greater the gdp of paraguay...

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (3, Informative)

orasio (188021) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048764)

They are hosting some of them at googlepages now.
Anyhow, they are not small domains the ones that were hijacked. One of them is the official page of the party.

This is not something that could ever go unnoticed.

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (2, Interesting)

mysidia (191772) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048862)

The only people they have to prevent noticing it are a majority of the population of their country.

And they probably have control of the media there, so this probably will go unnoticied by most people, until some time long after the elections, if ever.

They might not care if a few dozen technically-inclined people in their country happen to notice, or if people in other countries notice.

Govt' can explain away the "hijacking" as a technical problem, and people may buy the government's technical explanations over anything "some Americans" or some DNS nerds have to say about it. The gov't can just throw in jail or use ad-hominem attacks to marginalize the folks that claim they did something bad.

After all, the government is known by most to be a more "trustworthy" and "valid" source for that type of information.

Billy Bob just accusing the gov't folks of wrongdonig because he's a protestor, extremist, seditionist, has a beef with the gov't, etc.

They will either convince their people to believe it or intimidate their people into believing it, and either approach works all the same.

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049342)

Actually, I doubt that the people there trust the Colorado Party. My father grew up in Paraguay under Stroessner's rule, and the main effect that had on him was imparting a deep distrust of all government. Now, he has a very firm belief that no one can have any effect on a government save for those already working inside of it, and that all government workers are corrupt as all hell. He said that growing up, he had no idea that the stuff that Stroessner did wasn't happening everywhere else in the world.

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (3, Interesting)

Portal1 (223010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049992)

Actually they don't have control over the media

Most news papers are in the hands of rich people.
They are more in favor of the blue party here.

This incident was on television here last night.

Re:They should host the site on high-profile domai (1)

Taelron (1046946) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049146)

Just have the whole country switch to using OpenDNS servers, of course then they might start doing China like firewalling to block it...

Down with goverment censorship (4, Interesting)

bumof2005 (1043998) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048300)

It's amazing how easily entire countries of people can be manipulated. China is in the spotlight now but it is nothing compared to countries like North Korea who will get thrown in jail if they have a cell phone for fear that people will actually figure out that nothing they are told is true.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (5, Insightful)

orasio (188021) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048802)

In fatc, the issue now at Paraguay is different.
China is a communist country, where manipulating the media is justified by their ideology.

Paraguay is a country ruled by a conservative coalition. Their means of manipulating the media are much more occidental, and ruled by market news.

In other words, what happens now in Paraguay is just an expanded version of what happens in most occidental countries. Big interests control everything, corrupt government people follow those interests, and use the weight of government + corporations to keep in power.

In South America, we call that "la rosca". In the US it would be "coporate lobbysts".

What I mean is that you shouldn't look at what happens in Paraguay as a third world thing. To me, it's a risk we all have.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (4, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049122)

Paraguay is a country ruled by a conservative coalition.


Which only goes to show what my old bolshie Uncle Ivan used to say. "Kid," he'd say, "nobody believes in capitalism. Nobody believes in socialism. It's socialism for me, and capitalism for you!" Ivan may have been a red, but he was a cynic first and foremost, and that keeps you honest.

In the end, there is only one thing that really matters in any system: transparency. At least if the system is supposed to be run for the benefit of the people who live under it. You can be all for the proletariat, or all for the free market, but if you're pulling the wool of the peoples' eyes, you aren't any different from anybody else running a con behind high sounding priciples.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (-1, Troll)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048808)

the US is not the exception. neither the UK, Spain, Russia, nobody. 9/11, 11-M (spain), King's Cross and Beslan were executed by Al Qaeda but if you look closely you will see all the loose ends (seismographs, no plane debris in the pentagon, Donald Rumsfeld was not killed, 11-M was 3 days before ellection and turned the result around (rodriguez zapatero won, he responds to the US's interests in Northern African oil), the "terrorists" in king's cross were carrying IDs and filmed by security cameras (what for? if they don't want their families or leaders to be connected with them). UK tried to tighten the security laws, was rejected by the Parliament. another bombing just before the laws were accepted. the bombings were done AFTER london was chosen as the city for 2012 olympics...

why do terrorists kill common people? 9/11 before 9 AM (before high executives arrive), king's cross and spain: buses and trains, places where common people go. Beslan, russia: a school of poor children. what terrorist kills children? terrorism wants to get the "sympathy" of the people, NOT hate. Why kill innocent children? Why did the "plane" that crashed into the pentagon, did crash exactly where no one was working? Why do Iraqi terrorists kill their own people instead of US soldiers? Because they all respond to US+UK interests. Nothing else. And of course you will say all of this are theories and all. But I know they're true, you have been manipulated so much that you can't really tell the reality from the simulation (americans should read Simulacra and Simulation by Jean Baudrillard).

Re:Down with goverment censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048894)

just for the record, even if you are right (which i doubt you are) i am soo sick of hearing these conspiracy theories.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048952)

Wow. Some tinfoil hatter had mod points today. I'm not even going to qualify your ramblings as theories. They're paranoid delusions. Not to mention, completely wrong, even in the questions you're asking. Sheesh.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049372)

just proves my point. thank you.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

Artuir (1226648) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050334)

That's why it's called a delusion. Anyone could say anything and you've got this whole web of false facts or crazy beliefs so you can respond to just about anything with your rhetoric. It's amazing what confidence and a bit of ego will do even with batshit insanity .

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049400)

oh and don't worry. there's no global warming. the war on iraq wasn't about oil. all third world countries are like that because of their own mistakes, the US didn't have anything to do with that. the US is perfect, nothing's wrong, terrorists are a constant threat but they're under control. and of course, we have oil for at least 100 years more, more than enough time to allow the good oil companies to do some research in alternate energy and give us enough time to make the switch.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

hobbit (5915) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049724)

Even a stopped clock tells the right time twice a day.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049740)

"The bigger the lie, the more it will be believed."

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

BungaDunga (801391) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050068)

GRAVITY IS AN ILLUSION! GEORGE BUSH IS AN ALIEN/ILLUMINATUS/THE ANTICHRIST/JESUS! Those are lies, pretty big ones, and you don't believe them because they're not true.
Your argument is tautological: if we disagree, you claim it proves your argument. If I say "mice are actually 7-dimensional aliens who are controlling your brain" and you say "WTF, that's impossible." I can just say "See?! The mice are controlling you! QED." It's just not a solid basis for an argument.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1)

tamrood (821829) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048928)

You are right. China should copy America. Over here, the leaders of government don't care if they get caught lying any more.

Re:Down with goverment censorship (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049112)

Try living in the US. You think we're in the picture with honest "news"?

Re:Down with goverment censorship (3, Informative)

witherstaff (713820) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050212)

You don't have to worry only about the government censorship - corporate media censors items when it fits their interests too. While the article is about Paraguay, even in the US "land of the free" we have censorship and outright lies broadcast as news every day. Fox news had reporters fired [youtube.com] when they refused to lie in one of their reporting pieces. They sued under the whistleblower laws but lost.

Here's the chilling verdict [wikipedia.org] : There is no law in the US that news cannot lie to you. Or for better wording - Because the FCC's news distortion policy is not a "law, rule, or regulation"

While any government outright censoring is bad, any media company that passes itself off as a news source that is able to lie is even more insidious. While most news sources have a political bias, you shouldn't expect to have to decipher lies!

fp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048332)

fp

TOR (3, Interesting)

explosivejared (1186049) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048340)

Get the word out about tor. Vidalia is an easy to use controller. This is the exact sort of time when a network and protocol like onion routing is extremely valuable.

Re:TOR (2, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048356)

Hm.. yes.. but is there much to stop them from putting up "phony" exit nodes that also hijack the site?

Re:TOR (2, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048358)

Unfortunately, for most computer users, "Clicking the blue E" is the most they know about getting on the internet. Someone out there needs to create a really handy Active-X plugin that does TOR and put it out there for people to click on. I know, it'd probably cause more problems than it's worth, and may not even work that well as far as getting people to use it... perhaps someone else has a better idea on how to get some of these fundamental technologies out there to the unwashed masses? TV ads might do it...

Re:TOR (1)

cromar (1103585) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048828)

Making it easy for people is the first step. After that, I'm sure a lot of other people would be happy to donate to ad campaigns for Tor or other encrypted network technologies (I know I would). Currently, it's hard to even find trusted peers for most people who even understand how to set it up.

Re:TOR (2, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048942)

perhaps someone else has a better idea on how to get some of these fundamental technologies out there to the unwashed masses?
Yes. We first have to stop electing corporatist authoritarians who believe they have a God-given right to meddle in the affairs of other sovereign countries.

You can look at almost every single right-wing dictatorship and tin-pot tyrant in the world and find the fingerprints of the Nixon, Reagan, Bush I or Bush II administrations. Iran-Contra, Noriega, Saddam, Osama, Musharraf, Columbia, Bolivia, etc etc. The list goes on forever.

Last week, in testimony before Congress, we were told that the President no longer has to abide by treaties because it's a "time of war". That includes trade and environmental treaties.

After World War II, the United States was really considered a beacon of freedom around the world. We had the respect of everyone. Even after Viet Nam, there was a significant amount of Good Will toward the United States. Starting in 1980, we began squandering that good will, and in the last seven years, George Bush has destroyed every last bit of good faith that the international community had for us. Throw in a 12 trillion dollar debt and millions of lost industrial jobs, a phony war with somewhere between 1/2 million and a million civilian deaths, secret prisons and torture, and there is no longer any doubt that this administration has by far done more damage to our own country than any enemy could possibly do.

Heckuva job, Chippy McSnort.The fact that he and Cheney will retire rich and happy to their respective ranches is absolute proof that there is no God.

You better bet that the citizens of poor little countries like Paraguay are just keeping their heads down and trembling with fear until the day these monsters leave office.

Re:TOR (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049324)

During WW2, or possibly before that, many US companies realized there's a LOT of money to be made in the war business. I think it has less to do with a desire to meddle as much as a desire to keep arms selling. The trouble is, that business model doesn't work in the long term and they haven't figured out what the recoil on this latest campaign will be.

There a bit more to it than my simplistic view of "why the US meddles with other nations" but selling arms is a big part of it. We've got these little-discussed revolving doors where an executive from some company will see to it that a politician gets re-elected and then later that same executive gets a cushy government job with life-time benefits and connections for the next door he might step through. Cheney is a classic example of this revolving door. He's been with Haliburton, been with major pharmaceuticals and others and all the while, in between the two, he has held high ranking government positions such as secretary of defense. (And while he was in a position to do so, he helped push the twice previously rejected aspartame through FDA approval.) But the classic revolving door could not be illustrated better where Cheney, SECDEF what then hired into Haliburton and later became vice president of the united states... but he's been doing that for a LOT longer as have others.

(Another interesting and not well discussed issue is the current issue of the revolving door between airlines and the FAA... several prior FAA inspectors and executives have gone on to high positions within the airlines and leading up to the scandal's breaking, various airline complaints about FAA inspectors lead to some very questionable activity within the FAA's structure. At least one of the FAA leaders had since gone on to one of the major airlines for a high-paying job.)

It doesn't even stop there... yes, we meddle in the lives of other nations. We created Israel. Why? Is it our business to do so? Do a little digging. You probably won't approve of what you find. And as far as the Federal Reserve goes... has there ever been a non-Jewish chairman or board member? I'd be shocked if there were.

By bringing these areas, I mean to show that a relatively restricted list of players are involved in playing the government game. (Yes, I know that the Federal Reserve is not a branch of the U.S. Government, but a privately held corporation... but they exist with the permission and oversight of the legislative branch which has the power to dissolve them if needed.) The people who are put before us as electable choices are carefully selected before we have anything to say about it. So you can say we "keep electing the wrong people" but the right people are never allowed to participate in the game. You saw what happened to Ross Perot. This guy forced himself into being a candidate and many people voted for him. Various questionable activities led to his not being elected not the least of which may have been threats to his family. Perot was an anomoly, though... the people who get put before the U.S. voter isn't likely someone the U.S. voter actually wants. (This is an OLD tactic giving people the illusion of some control. This tactic is also used on children to get their cooperation by giving them "a choice" -- "do you want to go to bed now or in 5 minutes?")

The problem is not that we're voting in the wrong people, it's that there are no right people to vote for since the selection is made for us. And this nonsense about "party affiliation" is all part of this game with millions of people calling themselves democrats and republicans thinking they'll back "their" candidate. These "parties" are ultimately controlled by their owner-interests and we already know who owns which party thanks to handy references like open secrets. We don't stand a chance of having a "non-player" elected until these systems are dismantled. There may be hope though...

Look at how the music industry had risen and is presently in danger of falling and why. The industry had built itself up by "promoting" [owning] various popular artists until the only way to become popular was to first be owned by one of these big labels. Then they had themselves an oligopoly or something like that. (Is that the right term? Where a select few players 'compete' in an industry to the exclusion of all others.) But lately, we've seen the beginnings of a revolution of sorts where popular artists are abandoning the labels. This sort of tactic can only go so far, however, unless the artists themselves start promoting other, unknown artists aggressively enough to compete with the promotion machines used by "Big Music." In any case, there's a chance that through these means, the artists can actually over-throw the system that "Big Music" currently enjoys.

And the same could potentially happen with the internet... provided that rising players aren't silenced and censored or otherwise bought-out. Business and big media has been trying to own and control the internet to prevent exactly what many want to happen -- putting free information out and available to the people. Without information control, they have nothing to control the people with.

Re:TOR (1)

Scaba (183684) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050470)

Cheney is a classic example of this revolving door. He's been with Haliburton, been with major pharmaceuticals and others and all the while, in between the two, he has held high ranking government positions such as secretary of defense. (And while he was in a position to do so, he helped push the twice previously rejected aspartame through FDA approval.)

You're conflating Cheney and Rumsfeld. Cheney was with Halliburton, but never any pharmaceuticals; Rumsfeld was with Searle when aspartame was approved.

It doesn't even stop there... yes, we meddle in the lives of other nations. We created Israel. Why? Is it our business to do so? Do a little digging. You probably won't approve of what you find. And as far as the Federal Reserve goes... has there ever been a non-Jewish chairman or board member? I'd be shocked if there were.

Most of them weren't Jewish [jewishachievement.com] . Saying "I'd be shocked..." is no substitute for a little research.

Re:TOR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049364)

I think the problem is that people who would jump through hoops to get to this content are probably already convinced. The rest either don't know or don't care.

We are assuming, of course, that the content is worth getting to in the first place. I don't know anything about Paraguay or its politics. For all I know we could be talking about the ramblings of a white supremacist.

Re:TOR (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050322)

TOR has a DNS "leak" in most configurations. Sure, you are visiting the website anonymously, but you requested the DNS Records from a hijacked server.

Now, Freenet on the other hand is not designed to be only anonymous, but to be a content provider. Hijacking a Freenet website would prove to be much more difficult to do then hijacking a DNS server.

Augh? (1)

Monokeros (200892) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048360)

What's the ruling party called?
The "Ironic Party"?

Links to English Versions (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048366)

Here's that story linked to English translations of the sites in question:

"In Paraguay we are at T-9 days to national elections. The ruling party has been in power for nearly 61 years (including more than 30 years of dictatorship). Now the state-run ADSL company is hijacking the DNS [google.com] nationwide of a site [google.com] that denounces the corruption in the party."


There are other languages available at those links (hay otros idiomas disponibles en los enlaces).

Census of cyberspace censoring (3, Insightful)

KillerCow (213458) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048370)

In 1993, Internet pioneer John Gilmore said "the net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it", and we believed him. In 1996, cyberlibertarian John Perry Barlow issued his 'Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace' at the World Economic Forum at Davos, Switzerland, and online. He told governments: "You have no moral right to rule us, nor do you possess any methods of enforcement that we have true reason to fear."

At the time, many shared Barlow's sentiments. The Internet empowered people. It gave them access to information and couldn't be stopped, blocked or filtered. Give someone access to the Internet, and they have access to everything. Governments that relied on censorship to control their citizens were doomed.

Today, things are very different. Internet censorship is flourishing.

Read more at: Internet Censorship [schneier.com] .

I disagree - Gilmore's statement is accurate (5, Insightful)

arete (170676) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049110)

I'm not trying to pretend I know what Gilmore MEANT by his statement, but the way the first statement reads to me I certainly think is true. (I'm not saying there aren't bad things going on we should fight against - only that the statement is only false for a very idealist and broad interpretation.)

First let's strip away youthful idealism - routing around it doesn't mean it NEVER works or magically disappears - it just means it's much less likely to work, easier to fix, etc.

Second, let's be clear that "the Internet" includes all of us. When someone involved with that site posts it to /., that's part of routing around, and so is when we blog about it. This includes us doing hard work to keep it that way.

Finally, while it's obviously possible to keep information _out_ (away from some people), it's very hard to keep information _in_ on the internet. If you're going to (for the purposes of this discussion) strictly interpret the word censorship until it was only one of these things, it would definitely be the attempt to keep information in.

Traditionally censorship is keeping you from printing a newspaper (or killing you if you do) - that's different than going around town and taking away all the newspapers you can find, which is what's really going on here. The second technique only completely silences the _author_ if the newspaper only circulates inside that town.

Again, I'm not saying this isn't bad... but in pre-Internet censorship we wouldn't even HEAR about this story. Wikileaks is a great example of the Internet being positive in this regard. The world knows about Tibet. The Great Firewall doesn't even really keep people from viewing outside content - you just need a little technical savvy - and a lot of bravery! - to view outside content.

Re:Census of cyberspace censoring (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049818)

So instead of integrating the internet into society, addressing censorship issues, addressing local mores, addressing filters for parents, etc etc these hipster libertarians just gave a big collective FU to everyone who isnt exactly like them... and they expected this to end well?

Re:Census of cyberspace censoring (1)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049832)

Hmmm. I get your point, but the fact is (outside of, say, China) it's true. If nobody trusted the telco enough to use their DNS and instead used 4.2.2.1 (I think?), this wouldn't be a problem.

Now, even the Great Firewall of China isn't awfully challenging to get around... you just put your life on the line.

So would it be any better if ... (3, Funny)

Skapare (16644) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048386)

... I put up site that supports the corruption of the party in control?

so what can we do? (2, Interesting)

gibbsjoh (186795) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048410)

a. What is known about this in Paraguay? Are people aware that this is going on?
b. What can those of us outside Paraguay do to help? Mirror sites, etc?

JG

Re:so what can we do? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048814)

I am from Paraguay, and no. People (the vast percentage without internet access) is not aware of what is going on (was, they 'fixed the unfortunate mistake' already). Internet access here is very expensive, restricting it to the wealthier population.

It really didn't do much harm, because the ones with internet access tend to be the more critical to the way things are here, with or without having access to the hikacked sites.

It is well known to the ruling party (Partido Colorado) that once internet gets cheap enough for people in the middle/lower classes, their everlasting rule will come to an end. Because it is an information source that can't be controlled.

But hey, let them try. This is not the great firewall of China. It is just a bunch of idiots thinking they can hijack DNS entries and go unnoticed.

Unfortunately it isn't much you can do to help. It is us that need to wake up and put an end to 61+ years of corruption and oppression.

Elections here are going to be very similar to those in Zimbabwe. The ruling party has taken all kinds of dirty measures to control the election process. Partial judges, excessive number of reception tables, news fabrication, threats to people working in public institutions... business as usual.

Maybe this time the difference against them will be so overwhelming they won't be able to change the outcome.

Wish us luck...

Re:so what can we do? (1)

orasio (188021) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048892)

A - Oh, yes, they know
B - Get this on CNN.

Re:so what can we do? (1)

Portal1 (223010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050012)

It has already run on television here.

I would say, big fire back
sad new
nobody cares

put it everywhere (2, Interesting)

kris.montpetit (1265946) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048414)

If I were Paraguayan right now I would be spamming every forum I knew of with the argument of corruption, regardless of what the forum was about, so anyone using the net in Paraguay/the world is likely to see part of the message at least once.. If they couldn't post the whole idea at once, I would do it in parts, on a stay tuned kind of basis, and just keep the coverage of your spamming campaign as diverse as possible so no single entity can silence it...Think anonymous.

Seriously, Paraguayans should be spamming this news story..right now.

Re:put it everywhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048538)

And what happens when they find you and kill you?

Re:put it everywhere (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048564)

They have to find you first. And killing someone right before an election seems rather tricky. They don't have that level of control, otherwise the protest site wouldn't exist in the first place.

Re:put it everywhere (1)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048782)

Killing someone before an election is very easy. The trick is to manage the news enough to make everyone beleive you haven't done it.

Try standing for the opposition in north korea some time.

Re:put it everywhere (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049010)

My point precisely.

Re:put it everywhere (2, Interesting)

orasio (188021) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048954)

This is not that kind of government.
Of course, they _could_ kill you (they have the ability, but it's not their m.o.), but they don't need to. Think of it as a conservative government that is friends with all the media. They don't need to actively censor a lot of people.
The internet is an issue, because it doesn't respond that much to corporate interests. That's why they are censoring this. That, and because they just don't know how the internet works, and don't know about the Streissand effect.

Re:put it everywhere (1)

Portal1 (223010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050034)

I live here and would not agree the media is on the hand of the government

As mentioned before the rerouting has run on television already yesterday

Re:put it everywhere (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048546)

Looks like they are. I don't think it's a coincidence that we're hearing about it.

Re:put it everywhere (1)

orasio (188021) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048912)

IANAP, but I know corruption by the Colorado party is widely known there.

The issue is that lots of people just don't care and they don't think anything can be done against them.

Activism is seen as worthless. Maybe that can change things a bit.

OpenDNS (1)

cjb658 (1235986) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048634)

You should tell everyone in Paraguay about OpenDNS [opendns.com] .

OpenDNS is neither open or a dns (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048704)


yeah trade one broken DNS for another except opendns shows adverts, resolves everything (breaking apps) and tracks every DNS request just like spyware except the t&c does mention this if you read it

to be honest you have to be ignorant and stupid if you think opendns is a solution to anything (except the owners pocket books)

Re:OpenDNS is neither open or a dns (2, Insightful)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048794)

Adverts? Spyware?

It's an alternate root, not a proxy server. Most DNS queries are cached downstream anyway so they wouldn't get a lot of useful data if the tried.

Last I heard it was run by volunteers but according to the site now it looks like they've got some funding. Good for them.

OT: OpenDNS (2, Informative)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049100)

Adverts? Spyware?

It's an alternate root, not a proxy server.
I don't have the hate-on for OpenDNS that the GP does, but it does have several weaknesses as a service which caused me to stop using it.

The biggest problem, and one that the GP alluded to, is that OpenDNS resolves *everything* to a sort of 'parking' page. If you're using OpenDNS and you type in a bogus URL, rather than just not resolving, you'll get a redirect to an OpenDNS page. This is, IMO, misbehavior. However, there's no incentive for OpenDNS to stop, because it's on these pages that they place advertising and pay for themselves.

This behavior is particularly obnoxious when you combine it with an additional level of caching DNS. Let's say you have a DNS server on your LAN (like most home gateway/routers) and you point it to OpenDNS. If you're working with a site that may or may not exist -- say one that you're trying to configure -- OpenDNS will give you the parking page if it can't be found. But your local DNS server will cache the redirect, and it can take a while to purge. (I'm not sure what TTL they're set to, but it's evidently longer than it should be.) The upshot of this is that a site can look 'down' even though it ought to be up, because intermediate DNS servers cache the bogus OpenDNS result, rather than just failing to resolve.

I think it's great that there's an alternate root, and I really like that OpenDNS exists. It's a great concept. I just think their execution deviates from accepted practice and standards, and that's no way to run a DNS server. Too much rides on it.

... and now slashdotted? (1)

pieleric (917714) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048666)

As if the guys of partidocolorado didn't have enough pain with the DNS hijacking, we are now going to slashdot the site...

We are such helpful nerds!

Re:... and now slashdotted? (1)

orasio (188021) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048962)

Partido Colorado is the ruling party. They are the censors. Not the censored.

Hard to fight if Bush is behind this. (-1, Flamebait)

MonkeyBoyo (630427) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048672)

If GWB has really been setting up a post election bolthole, eg. Paraguay in a spin about Bush's alleged 100,000 acre hideaway [guardian.co.uk] , then some of his friends (particularly those in the intelligence community) may be working to keep Paraguay at the appropriate level of corruption.

That level of skill may be hard to fight.

Re:Hard to fight if Bush is behind this. (4, Funny)

shawnap (959909) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048924)

There are quite a few dubious claims in that article, but the most unbelievable is the implication that Bush knows that a country called Paraguay exists.

Re:Hard to fight if Bush is behind this. (1)

Portal1 (223010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050048)

O he does,

he has a huge property here
Think huge like several hundred of acres
Right on top a big water reserve

Mod Parent Up (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049022)

Now how in the fuck is the above post "off-topic"?

Is there anybody who doesn't think that our current President and Vice-President aren't making plans for their retirement, given that it's looking more and more like they're going to be charged with war crimes? Oh, they'll never face trial, but it's unlikely they're going to be having any European vacations after they leave office.

How humiliating for our great nation that such low men could have attained such high office, no matter that they did so in an illegitimate manner.

Re:Mod Parent Up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049378)

The Universe is too beautiful and complex to have been created by any God.

You are right. That's why it wasn't created by just any god; it was created by the God.

Py response (1)

Portal1 (223010) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048680)

Hi I am a foreigner living in Paraguay.

The issue is a little more mixed
It seems they rerouted www.partidocolorado.gov.
They claimed it was illegal use of their name/trademark.
same as one would try to register CocaCola.gov

In my point of view they should not have done this by using their powers in the national tel com and reroute the page, but they should have used the legal way "trademark/name infringement".

Another point is that people get a government they vote for. It is not so bad here that people are motivated to vote anything else.
Maybe this time there will be a change

About corruption,
Paraguay is one of the top positions, but nobody seems to care (sadly enough)

Re:Py response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048960)

I am a Paraguayan citizen. And what you say is somewhat true, but they also rerouted www.bastacarajo.com and www.victorbogado.com

It is not about illegal use of trademarks.. It is plain old censorship... the stupidest and most obvious, brain-dead way, but censorship nevertheless.

They backtracked now, because lots of people voiced their anger. But they tried, no doubt about it.

Re:Py response (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049046)

Another point is that people get a government they vote for.
I wish. Please google the 2000 US presidential election for details.

Re:Py response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049436)

Oh jesus, give it a rest. Gore lost, by a considerable margin. After more recounts than you can count on both hands, which overwhelmingly indicated that Bush won, I think it's time to stop crying wolf. Just because the president is a dickhead doesn't mean we didn't elect him.

It's not new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23048772)

I'm from Brasil and lived some months in Foz do Iguassu on the border with Paraguay.
Many people in BR go to PY to buy eletronics and others "made in china", or cigars, or guns, or....

Well, some years ago, vice president of PY was caught driving a stolen Jeep Cherokee in São Paulo - Brasil (a car like this in Brasil costs ~ US 97.000)

I said you can buy any movie or software there for ~ U$ 0.50 ?

Another legal history is that Bruce Wayne has drawn driver's licence there by telephone. This was done by a newspaper to show the ease in achieving false documents.

Re:It's not new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049038)

Yes, I am a paraguayan citizen and can confirm those news. Let's not forget it is the brazilian mafia the one who controls the illegal business of pirated sw/movies in Paraguay.

It is even worse: you can find the same thing right in the heart of Sao Paulo, so don't come here telling that as if it isn't a thing that also runs in your country.

It is a shame, yes, and it happens in your country, too. ;) peace, brazilian 'brother'.

Venezuela (4, Insightful)

Gocho (16619) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048842)

Same thing happened in Venezuela last year during the last referendum (which Chavez lost, BTW). The newly nationalized CANTV (the main Telco) hijacked all of its customers DNS to block access to the two biggest anti-chavez websites (NoticieroDigital and Noticias24). Nothing new here but good, old fascist techniques....

Re:Venezuela (1)

Voline (207517) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050296)

I hadn't heard about this. Do you have any citations to back up your assertions?

Gret way to prove uncorrupt (5, Funny)

a_generic_name (1242610) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048922)

Oh yeah, hijack a site saying you're corrupt. What a great way to prove that you're not.

OpenDNS (2, Interesting)

davidu (18) | more than 6 years ago | (#23048966)

They are using our OpenDNS servers as the control group. We've been noticing that a lot lately.

Plus, a lot of folks are using http://cache.opendns.com/ [opendns.com] to start checking the records of their personal site from around the world.

I assume it's a "trademark" excuse (1)

Punto (100573) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049092)

From looking at the sites, "Partido Colorado" (red party) is the ruling party, and the opposers registered "partidocolorado.org", and put some parody site there. The hijacked DNS redirects to a site that responds to "partidocolorado.org.py", which seems to be the official party site (you can tell because of the heaps of steaming bullshit they have in there). It's actually pretty confusing if you're not familiar with their politics (at first I thought this "red party" was the opposition, so I was confused about the other "red party" site).

Anyway, I assume they're claiming that "partidocolorado.org" is too similar to "partidocolorado.org.py" and it's taking advantage of their name (which is probably what they were trying to do, otherwise they would have gone with "red party sucks.com" or something.. most people get confused with the .orgs and .pys).

Of course, I doubt the paraguayan government has any jurisdiction over the root DNS, and I'd be surprised if they had a law that proposes dns hijacking as a solution to a conflict like this.

Re:I assume it's a "trademark" excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049136)

they also hijacked 'www.bastacarajo.com' (something like 'www.enoughisenoughdamnit.com') and that rules out any trademark excuse.

Plain simple censorship.

Re:I assume it's a "trademark" excuse (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23050174)

They haven't claimed anything. The DNS was hijacked in the state-owned incumbent telco, and today, a manager from the company denied that they have had any responsibility concerning it, and said that they were looking for the responsibles.

Pure bullshit.

Had a city named after a dictator (1, Flamebait)

keeboo (724305) | more than 6 years ago | (#23049144)

Until a couple years ago, the city now know as Ciudad de Este was called "Puerto Stroessner", after the former dictator.

After being ousted that man lived in Brazil until his last days.

That sucker was a friend with the militars in Brazil and other right-wing dictatorships in South America during the 60s 70s 80s. And those dictatorships had direct support from the USA.

Funny how often bad things around the world had the US involved.

Re:Had a city named after a dictator (1)

Craptastic Weasel (770572) | more than 6 years ago | (#23050386)

Until a couple years ago, the city now know as Ciudad de Este was called "Puerto Stroessner", after the former dictator.

After being ousted that man lived in Brazil until his last days.

That sucker was a friend with the militars in Brazil and other right-wing dictatorships in South America during the 60s 70s 80s. And those dictatorships had direct support from the USA.

Funny how often bad things around the world had the US involved.
And Kevin Bacon lives in the US! It's six degrees of Americanization!

rules are only for the little people (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049242)

look, if you're going to play in the big leagues, just give up on the notion that those in power will be ethical

As to the results of absolute power, you can clearly see how absolutely corrupt these evil people are.

Hermanos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23049874)

If Paraguayans are anything like us Brazilians, nobody will give a shit about corruption while there's beer, soccer and scantily clothed women on TV.

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