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Satellite IDs Ships That Cut Cables

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the busted-from-the-sky dept.

Networking 186

1sockchuck writes "Undersea telecom cable operator Reliance Globalcom was able to use satellite images to identify two ships that dropped anchor in the wrong place, damaging submarine cables and knocking Middle East nations offline in early February. The company used satellite images to study the movements of the two ships, and shared the information with officials in Dubai, who impounded the two vessels. The NANOG list has a discussion of where Reliance might have obtained satellite images to provide that level of detail. Google News links more coverage of the developments."

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Coverup (0, Troll)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060112)

Yeah. Some private carrier finally analysed this - months later!

Oh! Look! It was Iraq and North Korea! Look! Look, Jane! See North Korea run!

The intels who did this don't even bother with subtlety anymore.

Man, are those guys good, or what? (5, Funny)

capnkr (1153623) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060178)

Just think - the CIA/NSA/current administration somehow managed to purchase foreign-flagged ships of the line from arguably 'enemy' countries, hiding said purchases from both those governments, our own goverment, and the rest of the world, and then they somehow managed to get them to drop their anchors in just the places needed to cut the proper cables lying submerged on the seabed. They pulled all this off successfully - until YOU managed to figure it out.

Brilliant!

Huh? Occam who???

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060226)

Phase 1: Wait until ship stops near cable

Phase 2: Send stealth submarine to cut cable

Phase 3: Blame ship, produce satellite images for proof

Phase 4: Profit

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (2, Funny)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060420)

Phase 1:Wait until ship stops near cable.

Phase 2: Send in laser armed sharks to cut cable.

Phase 3: Blame ship, produce satellite images for proof.

Phase 4: Geek points!

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (0, Redundant)

buildguy (965589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060604)

Phase 1: Wait until ship stops near cable.
Phase 2: We get signal!
Phase 3: Blame ship, produce satellite images for proof.
Phase 4: All your base are belong to us.

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (1, Insightful)

kylehase (982334) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060614)

1) Paint big <insert axis of evil country> flag on the surface of ship.
2) Cut cable with ship in #1 above.
3) Record evidence of "act of terror".
4) Wage war against evil country.
5) Profit for Halliburton.
6) Rest of US economy fails.

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (4, Funny)

buildguy (965589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060620)

7. Hyperinflation.
8. Buy a micronation sized chunk of the former United States.
9. Dystopian Cyberpunk Future!

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (1)

Kamineko (851857) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060660)

Phase 4: Write about it in your global newspaper before anybody knows about it.

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060900)

Actually, it's:

1) Send a submarine to wait at a cable
2) Send by a ship that "accidentally" damages the cable, a couple of miles away
3) While the cable's broken, cut it AGAIN with the submarine and install a tap while nobody will notice the outage (since there's already one, anyway)
4) When the cable company repairs the breakage caused by the ship, your tap's installed
5) Spy^H^H^H Profit

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (1)

F34nor (321515) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061124)

1) Send a submarine to wait at a cable
2) Unwrap cable & bend so light leaks out
3) Jimmy Carter!

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (1)

wish bot (265150) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061402)

Has anyone actually been able to do this? Last I heard it was given up on because it was just too damn hard. That was a while ago.

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (1)

amirulbahr (1216502) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061186)

-5 Not Funny!

There was no ??? phase.

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (4, Funny)

Viceroy Potatohead (954845) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061344)

Don't be silly!

The correct step three is:
Build a fake Earth in New Mexico with a little model ship on it, and take a picture of it with a normal camera.

Satellites? Pfft. You've bought into the hoax that we've actually sent things into orbit.

Buy? (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060654)

Huh? Occam who???
Nah. All you'd have to do is bribe someone...

How's that for Occam? Hmm?

 

Re:Buy? (1)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061192)

Nah. All you'd have to do is bribe someone... How's that for Occam? Hmm?
Horrible. There's still no motive, not to mention that said someone would just turn around and sell you out at the earliest opportunity. You seem to have applied a generous portion of Occam's Shaving Cream, to avoid all those nasty cuts and scrapes.

Re:Man, are those guys good, or what? (1)

blind monkey 3 (773904) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061548)

WRONG!!
There are no real enemy countries. There are no terrorists. It is all made up to keep the people in line, the "enemy" is a fabrication to keep the working class in check. Any underground movement is actually set up by the ruling class to capture troublesome workers - Bin Laden as everybody knows, was trained by the CIA... he is still working for the CIA!

Thank you MR Eric Arthur Blair.

here is another coverup, please view (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060206)

we never landed on the moon

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1376152848542315216&hl=en [google.com]

keep dreaming suckers...

Re:here is another coverup, please view (2, Funny)

Merusdraconis (730732) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060464)

oh geez not this shit again.

The odds that the moon landing was faked are about as high as my not submitting this post. And the odds that the American government is successfully running a conspiracy are about as high as the odds that the American government can run anything else competently.

Re:here is another coverup, please view (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060510)

The odds that the moon landing was faked are about as high as my not submitting this post.
what post?

Re:here is another coverup, please view (0, Redundant)

somersault (912633) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060624)

In Soviet Russia, government runs country! And moon lands on you!

Re:here is another coverup, please view (2, Funny)

StarfishOne (756076) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060666)

That's no moon!
(sorry, obligatory..)

Re:here is another coverup, please view (2, Funny)

buildguy (965589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060688)

It's a trap! (sorry, also obligatory...)

Re:here is another coverup, please view (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060942)

ahh.. so what you're saying is that the US government incompetently conspired to cut these cables?

All I want to know is did they have the help of The Reverse Vampires?

Thank you Mr. Expert (5, Funny)

TheMiddleRoad (1153113) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060256)

Is it your years in the CIA or your years in the conspiracy nutjob section of the bookstore that make you so knowledgeable?

Re:Coverup (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060262)

It says a "Korean shipping company." Not North Korea.

My guess is that it was a South Korean shipping company. But that doesn't make for as much rhetoric.

Re:Coverup (4, Informative)

pipatron (966506) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060632)

My guess is that it was a South Korean shipping company.

That's quite likely, since South Korea build the most ships in the world.

Re:Coverup (4, Informative)

WaltBusterkeys (1156557) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060332)

It was Iraq and North Korea!

Except the second ship was South Korean, our ally. North Korea only has a handful of blue water ships. South Korea, electronics manufacturer to the world, has many.

When in doubt, "Korean" mean South Korean.

Re:Coverup (5, Informative)

WaltBusterkeys (1156557) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060740)

I actually retract my statement above. It's not clear whether the ship is North or South Korean at this point. The only entry in the international ship registry [e-ships.net] matching an MT Ann ("Merchant Transport Ann") is a North Korean vessel.

5105 7320069 ANN HMZE6 Oil Products Tanker 22600 1973 12 Korea (North)

However, there's an "Ankuk" on the same list that's a South Korean ship that would also match:

5090 8130033 ANKUK NO. 7 Oil Products Tanker 2474 1982 06 Korea (South)

I'm no expert on ships, so it's possible I'm looking in all the wrong places. Or that there's a translation problem from Korean to English. Maybe somebody else has a better lead?

I am sorry, (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060348)

What interest does the US have in accusing its own puppet government (Iraq) and one of it's best allies, South Korea, of sabotage?

Oh, that's right, none. STFU, troll.

Re:I am sorry, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061174)

Never heard of taking one for the team? Or that it's much easier to bribe someone who looks favourably on your cause? The only troll I see is you, my anonymous friend.

Hmm, never thought I'd say that to myself....

Re:Coverup (0, Redundant)

eli pabst (948845) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060402)

I think the tinfoil hat is cutting off circulation to your brain. If it's a South Korean ship (article doesn't specify) and an Iraqi ship, then they're both U.S. allies.

Re:Coverup (1)

coinreturn (617535) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061490)

If it's a South Korean ship (article doesn't specify) and an Iraqi ship, then they're both U.S. allies.

Iraq is only a U.S. ally because they were forced to be one.

Cutting cables like nuclear war (3, Insightful)

daBass (56811) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060508)

It is so incredibly easy to cut cables and once someone does it, everybody will and everybody loses.

MAD: Mutually Assured Disconnection

Hence, nobody does it.

A cable gets cut by accident every week of the year. So this time there were a couple grouped a bit closer both in time and geography. Big Deal.

Re:Coverup (3, Interesting)

tumbleweedsi (904869) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060586)

The last report I saw into this suggested that it was the US because Iraq and Israel (the two main friends of the US in that region) were not impacted. This could either have been a test run for something else or a crafty excuse to re-route traffic from that region via the US (as actually happened) where the authorities have more chance of snooping on it. The reports into this were also pretty specific that sat data that was analysed at the time showed no vessels in the area of the break for 12 hours either side of the break.

Re:Coverup (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061384)

Dude:
Were they not to "even bother with subtlety anymore", they'd have come out with this information much sooner.
God forbid a tiny amount of fact-checking before an accusation is made.
If this were Tuesday, I'd hand you Occam's Razor and some Burma Shave.
You are the boy who cried wolf (Blitzer).

Now all we need... (1)

Eevee1 (1147279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060136)

All we need is a photon beam that can cut cables instead of relying on ships.

Re:Now all we need... (1)

HTRednek (793937) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060410)

You have to watch out for those photon beams.... we don't want another swath cut through Florida. That expanse was a mess, always tripping over spheres... did I mention I don't like reptiles?

Re:Now all we need... (1)

Eevee1 (1147279) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060436)

You aren't going to vote into the election then, going by the fact you hate reptiles.

Re:Now all we need... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060734)

You aren't going to vote into the election then, going by the fact you hate reptiles.
It won't make any difference because everybody votes for the lizards, in case the wrong lizard gets in.

weird, huh? (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060152)

Kinda odd that they'd have taken a picture clear enough to ID ships of that remote part of the world the same day, or possibly even within a couple hours of the ships being there. And two cables cut by unrelated ships within such a short timeframe? This is soooo conspiracy inducing. I think it was all one big test to see what would happen if someone cut the cables. At least now we know all we have to do is drag and anchor to disrupt the communications infrastructure of entire countries. And we thought we needed EMP! Silly us.

Re:weird, huh? (5, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060222)

And two cables cut by unrelated ships within such a short timeframe? This is soooo conspiracy inducing.
Is it? have you even checked the likelihood of that happening? As a matter of fact, in an average year, around 50 undersea cables are broken. Given that there are 365 days in a year, what is the chance of two breaking in 'such a short timeframe?' It doesn't happen every day, but it's not really out of the ordinary. Check these things before you try to dream up a conspiracy.

Seriously, when it comes to technology slashdot is collectively pretty intelligent; but when it comes to paranoia and politics, slashdot collectively drops down to the IQ of a two year old.

Re:weird, huh? (5, Funny)

dunezone (899268) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060474)

Well you finally solved it...

1. Create Paranoia on Slashdot
2. Make and Sell Tinfoil Hats
3. Profit

Cite your sources (1)

Hecatonchires (231908) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060520)

As a matter of fact, in an average year, around 50 undersea cables are broken.
I'd like to know more about this

Re:Cite your sources (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060576)

It's lame to demand that people cite things that are easy to find on your own.

google "how often are undersea cables cut, on average" yields a bunch of sources that say once every three days.

The whole "cite your sources" thing is generally meant to stifle conversation instead of enhance it. Unless you're actually asking for something that is tough to find or unlikely or contentious, then you're being silly.

Re:Cite your sources (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060866)

Tell that to my lecturer

Re:Cite your sources (5, Informative)

WaltBusterkeys (1156557) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060594)

Your wish is the community's command. Here's ZDNet on cable statistics [zdnet.co.uk]

According to one paper presented at last year's SubOptic conference in Baltimore, Maryland, rates of cable fault in water over 1km deep are less than 0.1 faults per year, per 1,000km of installed cable. This implies around 50 deepwater repairs per year, globally. At depths of less than 1km, failure rates hovered between 1-2 per 1,000km in the 1990s, but have been steadily declining. According to a SubOptic 2004 paper, the rate in 2003 was 0.2 fault per 1,000km.

In other words, that's 50 deep-water cuts per year, in addition to some more shallow-water cuts per year.

Another expert puts it this way [zdnet.com] :

He said there are approximately 50 cable cuts a year, 65 percent of which are due to fishing trawlers dragging heavy nets and 18 percent of which are due to shipsâ(TM) anchors. âoeThey donâ(TM)t even track terrorism,â he said. âoeCable cuts are a routine part of the business.â

These statistics don't include power failures and other problems with cables that arise from the land side; if a switching station goes down then the cable goes dark, even if it's still intact.

Re:Cite your sources (5, Funny)

HoppQ (29469) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061636)

He said there are approximately 50 cable cuts a year, 65 percent of which are due to fishing trawlers dragging heavy nets and 18 percent of which are due to shipsâ(TM) anchors. âoeThey donâ(TM)t even track terrorism,â he said. âoeCable cuts are a routine part of the business.â
A møøse once bit my sister's cable...

Re:weird, huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061158)

Seriously, when it comes to technology slashdot is collectively pretty intelligent; but when it comes to paranoia and politics, slashdot collectively drops down to the IQ of a two year old.



The average 2 year old has an IQ of 100.

Re:weird, huh? (3, Informative)

CustomDesigned (250089) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061368)

Applying the standard birthday paradox math, the probability that at least 2 of 50 cuts in a year fall on the same day is 97%. So the weird part is why these particular same day cuts were news. The odds of two cuts on the same day affecting the same country group are lower. It is harder to quantify "country group", however.

Re:weird, huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061376)

Seriously, when it comes to technology slashdot is collectively pretty intelligent; but when it comes to paranoia and politics, slashdot collectively drops down to the IQ of a two year old.


AM NOT!!!! I'm telling Mom!

Re:weird, huh? (2, Funny)

fazookus (770354) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061566)

For what it's worth, your basic two year old is breathtakingly smart, just not in the IQ sort of way. It's when they've gotten older and stupider that they become able to contribute to Slashdot.

Sattelite images make sense to me (2, Interesting)

TheMiddleRoad (1153113) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060266)

When cables get cut, wouldn't you, as a service provider, want to know what ships are in the area? Might not intelligence services take a gander with their satellites to see what is happening in the area?

Re:weird, huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061580)

Such a short time frame ?

This is slashdot .. of course you understand the 'Birthday paradox'.If not , go look it up. after about 50 or so 'events' per year you are almost assured that two such events will happen on the same day.

I hate to say I told you so... (5, Interesting)

Grym (725290) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060154)

And here [slashdot.org] I was being made to feel like a regular fool for not being 99.99% positive (as "proven" by Bayes' theorem, no less) that the U.S. government (or others) were intentionally disrupting internet services to presumably stop the Iranian Oil Bourse [wikipedia.org] .

I'll never understand how a technical-minded group such as slashdot that prides itself on objectivity and generally mocks blind faith can, at times, get so easily carried away.

-Grym

Re:I hate to say I told you so... (1)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060170)

I'll never understand how a technical-minded group such as slashdot that prides itself on objectivity and generally mocks blind faith can, at times, get so easily carried away.
Remember the child-hood comment "takes one to know one" when someone called you an idiot? Same idea, except most of us aren't willing to admit it.

Turn your spam filters on conspiracy, Mr. Spock! (1)

TheMiddleRoad (1153113) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060286)

Whatever my spam filters catch must be true. No matter the evidence presented, I know my penis will grow and Mr. Nabuti will give me half of his no-longer frozen assets.

Re:I hate to say I told you so... (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060360)

Well if you want to talk objectivity, then how do a few pixels prove anything to you?

Your subject (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060422)

You definitely don't hate to say I told you so. If you did you wouldn't have bothered to post at all.

Re:I hate to say I told you so... (1)

LaskoVortex (1153471) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060878)

Yes, that was me. Thank you for making me famous, or perhaps infamous.

Anyway, before, when the cable cutting phenomenon was brand new, this assumption was stated:

Considering that historically these cables are cut or disabled only once a year

If you go back and read my posts carefully, you will notice that I calculated odds based on that assumption. Now, in the post above by phantomfive, he stated a different, and perhaps more accurate number for the rate of undersea cable cutting:

As a matter of fact, in an average year, around 50 undersea cables are broken

I would have calculated different odds with the latter number. I'm still not sure which is correct. However I calculated the odds with the best numbers I could find. You certainly never provided a better number yourself, nor did any one else at the time. If you like, I can redo the math with the knowledge of 50 cuts per year. This will indeed drop the likelihood of correlation between the events and consequently our expectation that the events are the result of malicious activity.

Now, the question remains: was I right? Well, I stand by my ability to do arithmetic, so I am confident my math was right. Of course, considering your excitable and non-scientific nature, I'm wondering what meaning you are going to ascribe to my confidence in my math.

Re:I hate to say I told you so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061424)

Using history this way is a decent way to get Vegas odds for really bored gamblers before the fact, but it doesn't represent a rigorous analysis or present any kind of confidence interval. You need to get over yourself, seriously.

Re:I hate to say I told you so... (1)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061570)

Reading the previous posts linked to you said your figure of 1 cable cut a year was a well sourced figure even when it was pointed out how remarkably unlikley that was.

So to the question of were you right, almost certainly not - regardless of how good you may be at maths.

Then do it. (1)

bondsbw (888959) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061592)

You say you can plug in the real numbers and make it work, so go and do it. Post it right here. If you are so sure of yourself, back it up instead of saying "I stand by my ability to do arithmetic."

I don't care if you can do math on the wrong numbers; do it on the right numbers, and prove yourself not to be so politically motivated that you would make up numbers to prove a point.

None (1)

hassanchop (1261914) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061676)

Of course, considering your excitable and non-scientific nature, I'm wondering what meaning you are going to ascribe to my confidence in my math.


None. Math on the wrong numbers is useless, no matter how impressed you are with its accuracy.

Then don't because you were wrong (1)

hassanchop (1261914) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061612)

Seriously though, if this article is somehow "proof" to you that your opinion was correct, then all those who were questioning your intellect were correct to do so.

Re:I hate to say I told you so... (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061728)

Slashdot is only barely, tangentially a group. Mostly, you can't rely on the same people posting to or even reading the same stories. Add as few as 100 yahoo's to that, and you end up with half assed, half baked posts about anything and everything. Like this one.

Jerks... (3, Funny)

stendec (582696) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060162)

The cable was damaged because of jerks and force of the ship, the official said.

JERKS!!!!

Reminds me .. (2, Funny)

s74ng3r (963541) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060172)

Reminds me of the old joke where the system administrators were puzzled that their servers went down almost every night at around 12mn and restarted 30 minutes after. Turns out, the janitor had to unplug the servers to plug in the vacuum during that time. :)

Some more details coming in now.... (5, Informative)

superash (1045796) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060186)

Indian officer held for undersea cable damage

http://www.ibnlive.com/news/indian-officer-held-for-undersea-cable-damage/63234-3.html

Re:Some more details coming in now.... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061576)

Wow, according to TFA, the Korean (unclear North vs. South) vessel owners had to pay the wopping sum of 60K. The smoking gun:

During police interrogation, the official of the Korean ship admitted that the vessel was passing through the area and agreed to pay damages.

The Iraqui ship is expected to cough up 350K. This after:

Dubai Police will refer the Indian chief officer and a Syrian chief engineer to Dubai Public Prosecution by next week. The captain of the ship, who is an Iraqi, was not on board the vessel when it was impounded.

I would think (and with no actual knowledge of maritime law nor particular interest in obtaining it at the moment), that it would take a court of some jurisdiction to handle this before handing over the cash. Curiouser and Curiouser.

SURE, SURE.... (1)

TheSpengo (1148351) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060192)

We believe ya, right guys? :P

Just refuse (2, Funny)

ArIck (203) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060202)

I just refuse to believe in any story which does not has the theme of international conspiracy in it. This is /. There can be no man made mistakes!!

Somehow it must be Israel's fault (5, Insightful)

TheMiddleRoad (1153113) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060214)

The conspiracy nuts are pitiful. I used to think they were all on the right, but now I know there are just as many if not more on the left.

Re:Somehow it must be Israel's fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060902)

You know, there are non-partisan conspiracy nuts as well. They are so kooky they've been disowned by both sides of the spectrum!

Re:Somehow it must be Israel's fault (3, Insightful)

Squalish (542159) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061328)

There are more conspiracy nuts on the opposite of whichever side has systematically abused their power for sinister gain, dissolving long-held protections, destroying systems and bucking customs for their own confusing purposes in direct opposition to the obvious right thing to do, or the interests of their employers (us). When they do it openly in many different areas without explaining themselves, and there is a well-funded, small group of idealogues behind them, who insist on an absolute right to their own secrecy(they claim the entire Executive Branch may choose whether to testify to court or Congress), and secrets keep leaking out (like suspending the 4th amendment in 2002) from disgruntled ex-employees...

It's very difficult to have ANY sort of imagination, not just the tin-foil hat kind, and avoid wondering about at least the possibility that the current administration is involved in several large, sinister conspiracies which the public doesn't know about yet. We have literally dozens available that are already in the public sphere.

This is why 9/11 conspiracy nuts will never die, even if they can't convince skeptics like myself who pick at the technical details. The thing their stories agree on - that those presently in power either caused or could have prevented the attack - fits like a glove into what we know about the administration's goals pre-attack and their actions post-attack. If the Democrats used an attack(cause unknown) to drastically change the country, get rid of all the constitutional rights you hold dear, fulfill a bullet point in preexisting plan to grow the military industrial complex, wage an aggressive war longer than WW2, set us up for at least the possibility of the destruction of our democracy, steal elections, and generally act like a bad Disney villain, there would be a hell of a lot of Republican conspiracy theorists after 8 years as well.

Your political beliefs should not inform your reasoning, it should be the other way around.

Re:Somehow it must be Israel's fault (3, Insightful)

moxley (895517) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061470)

Well I will tell you this much - it's only a true fool who believes that "conspiracies never happen" and everything govt/intel says is true.

Indeed, conspiracies happen all of the time - any time more than one person gets together with another and plans to do something. It's also one of the msot common criminal charges in the US.

I still think that the odds of how this happen with so many cables in such a short time span is suspicious. Does that mean it wasn't an accident? Anything is possible, but some things are more likely than others and keep in mind that those groups or agencies who do these sort of things specialize in damage control, cover stories, and manipulation of the public.

All I am saying is that you really don't know, and for people to act like it's "case closed no questions remain" over this press release is kind of short sighted. It really doesn't change a thing. If this was done intentionally there would be a cover, likely a couple of layers of cover.

Re:Somehow it must be Israel's fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061640)

W

Indeed, conspiracies happen all of the time - any time more than one person gets together with another and plans to do something. It's also one of the msot common criminal charges in the US.
in reality , the groups don't even need to know who the other is to 'conspire'

Re:Somehow it must be Israel's fault (2, Insightful)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061642)

True but as someone once said you don't want to keep such an open mind that your brain falls out which would appear to be a necessary pre-condition for the vast majority of popular conspiracies.

Re:Somehow it must be Israel's fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061620)

Conspiracy theorists are laughable mostly out of process of elimination. This is because the ones who're proved correct cease to be called conspiracy theorists and instead become "quick thinkers," "brave whistle blowers," or even, on occasion, "heroes." That leaves the ones who're wrong, who we call, "crackpots.", and those are the ones we hear the most about.

Yeah, I know, many CTs really are pitiful crackpots who refuse to recognize the truth even when it's rubbed in their face. It does not follow that folks looking for meaning in an unusual event, like lots of undersea cables to a particular country going dead all at once, fit that category. I'll bet most of these folks when faced with the facts just said, "oh, I didn't know that these were so frequent," and just drove on with their day. Deriding them as "pitiful" misses the point of their important contribution. Isn't if more useful to have skeptics who are proved wrong than to have no one being skeptical at all?

Paraguayan conspiracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060238)

Stop censoring us, you damn paraguayan government!!

Re:Paraguayan conspiracy (1)

buildguy (965589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060626)

Stupid censor bars blocking my view.

Nanog Thread (4, Informative)

Rufus211 (221883) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060318)

GMane is a *far* easier interface to read than whatever nanog's official archive uses:
http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.org.operators.nanog/54752 [gmane.org]

Re:Nanog Thread (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060874)

GMane is a *far* easier interface to read than whatever nanog's official archive uses:
No offense, but neither of them are easy to read.
Am I the only one who uses the nested view on /.?

As for "where Reliance might have obtained satellite images to provide that level of detail"
Who says they need anything better than the avg 1 or 2 meter resolution pictures?

It isn't all that hard to track the movements of a commercial boat back to its last port of call and make a phone call to find out who was there.

Re:Nanog Thread (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061768)

Nested view user here.

The true beauty of gmane is that it does nntp (at news.gmane.org). The original pick-your-interface forum, rather than any of the thousands of poor reinventions.

george bush (1, Funny)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060342)

Some how i know this is george bush's fault. i don't care what the evidence says!

Caused By Jerks (1)

BryanL (93656) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060444)

The article says the damage was caused by jerks. So, if those jerks would watch where they drop anchor these things wouldn't happen. I think jerks are the cause of most of the worlds problems, so the news here comes as no surprise.

I know where they got the satellite images! (1)

Xest (935314) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060480)

It's obvious, the NSA let them have them because they realised people guessed it was them that cut the cables so to pretend it wasn't they did a double bluff and gave out the images to say "look we're the good guys here!"

It's all part of the coverup!

Next week on Internet Conspiracies.com we bring you details of the sharks with laser beams that cut the other cables.

Seriously though, where did they get satellite imagery capable of seeing ships? well erm, seeing as you can just about pick out people on Google earth I wouldn't imagine it was too much of a challenge being able to see big god damn ships. I'm sure plenty of companies and nations with an interest in finding out which muppet cut their net access can provide such imagery?

Re:I know where they got the satellite images! (1)

tuxicle (996538) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060546)

Except that the few places on Google Earth that you can see high levels of detail are through aerial photography, not satellite.

Re:I know where they got the satellite images! (1)

buildguy (965589) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060616)

You know the NSA only analyzes data, it doesn't actually have your classical CIA type "agents in the field".

not NSA, NRSA maybe (1)

codecracker007 (789100) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060772)

Considering the power that the Reliance conglomerate wields in India, I would not be surprise if it was NRSA [nrsa.gov.in] that provided the satellite data.

Why aren't those ships in the registry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060648)

"The Korean ship 'MT Ann' and Iraqi ship 'MV Hounslow' "

Can you locate those ships, here's the Korean shipping register.
http://www.krs.co.kr/eng/index.html

And here's an assembly of the worlds shipping registers.
http://www.e-ships.net/index/M1.shtml

I can't find either of those ships. It's not that I'm a conspiracy nut, it bothers me when I'm presented with information that immediately draws a blank when it should be trivial to look up.

Re:Why aren't those ships in the registry? (2, Informative)

WaltBusterkeys (1156557) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060690)

Not all ships owned by Korean companies are registered as Korean flag vessels.

Look at US cruise lines -- most US-owned cruise liners are registered in other countries (usually the Bahamas).

See flag of convenience [wikipedia.org] for a list of countries that are the most frequent places to register vessels. There are Korean-owned vessels registered in Belize, Cambodia, Cyprus ... etc.

Hounslow and Ann (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060824)

Thing is I can't find it, even in the conglomerated list. I also check places like Panama individually, Cambodia I don't have the list for.

Can you find it?

As soon as they said 'Hounslow' and 'Ann' those immediately struck me as English names, so I want to confirm the story, but can't find the ships.

bah. (0)

apodyopsis (1048476) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060792)

oh way to go. ruin a perfectly good conspiracy theory!

Are we all filmed 24/7 at this resolution? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23060832)

What seems incredible is that video footage of that resolution was available for those particular places at that particular time. It looks like we are all filmed 24/7, everywhere in the world. Which requires an incredible amount of resources (sattelites, cameras, bandwith, etc.). Or was it by chance that these spy sattelites were pointed to these areas? Or is it something like 1 photo/hour/place in the world?

Re:Are we all filmed 24/7 at this resolution? (1)

hey (83763) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061330)

Good question.
Certainly the area in question is more likely to be photographed.

Not a subscriber (1)

tsotha (720379) | more than 6 years ago | (#23060854)

Bah, this is the one time I wish I were an actual /. subscriber. Then I could go through my history and find the nutjobs who were expecting war with Iran "any day now" when the cables were cut. And publicly point and laugh at them. I suppose I'll have to settle for truthers on Digg.

Re:Not a subscriber (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#23061412)

I'll have to post AC because I already spent around 7 or 8 mod points on this thread, but I'd like to inform you that Google is your friend in this case. Just google for your user name with site:slashdot.org. I think you can even put paths after the TLD for the site: predicate on Google, but I'm not sure.

Images might not have to be that sharp. (4, Insightful)

F34nor (321515) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061226)

If you take the layout of the deck and then compare it to ships in port at known times and locations it would be easy to ident. ships even with a meter resolution. The color and organization of shipping containers has got to be nearly as good a fingerprint even form space.

That's some impressive technology... (1)

KeyThing (997755) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061446)

And, yet, they can't seem to find those people on "Lost"...

cutting on the cheap (2, Interesting)

v1 (525388) | more than 6 years ago | (#23061656)

The one ship that did get released only paid 60 grand to get out of hock. I can't imagine that covering the cost to repair the cable, let alone the loss incurred by the cutting of the cable.

I wonder how much that cost the internet providers... one would assume that whoever they leased the pipe from had to be given an alternate service, paid for by the company owning the cables that were cut, since they were likely under contract to provide the service. That can't have been cheap. Unless they used another line they owned, but still you'd think they would have to compensate their customers somewhat for the severe degradation of services and the downtime?

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