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Stanford Hospital's Pneumatic Tube Communication

blee37 (1181835) writes | more than 4 years ago

2

blee37 (1181835) writes "From the article: "Every day, 7,000 times a day, Stanford Hospital staff turn to pneumatic tubes, cutting-edge technology in the 19th century, for a transport network that the Internet and all the latest Silicon Valley wizardry can’t match: A tubular system to transport a lab sample across the medical center in the blink of an eye.""
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Distinguished Gentleman from Alaska (1)

TWX (665546) | more than 4 years ago | (#30716294)

Hmmm... So Ted Stevens was right in a way, at least in the eyes of the Steampunk fans...

Pretty amazing reliability (1)

garyebickford (222422) | more than 4 years ago | (#30717584)

"The system does occasionally falter, but it’s operative 98.8 percent of the time, Robinson said. And no cylinder has ever gotten stuck in a tube, he said."

Not bad for 19th century technology (albeit controlled and monitored with brand-spanking-new sensor and computer tech). The intertubes run at 18 MPH - a lot faster than a guy with a cart.

Of course, 'old' tech isn't necessarily all that uncommon - we use asphalt roads largely unchanged since the 1800's, and concrete not unlike that used by the Romans.

And we'll probably still have Perl, PHP and C programmers toiling away in 2110. :D

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