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DHS Requires Your Travel Plans 72 Hours in Advance

corbettw (214229) writes | more than 3 years ago

9

corbettw writes "I haven't seen this anywhere yet. I got an email from American Airlines detailing a new requirement imposed on them by the Department of Homeland Security. Starting November 1, all passengers in the US will have to submit their personal information (including full name, date of birth, and gender) to DHS, through their airline or travel agent, at least 72 hours in advance. This means you can no longer fly anywhere in the US with less than three-days notice. Did your mother have a stroke and you have to rush to be by her side? Too bad. What about that client two states over who needs some facetime or else they'll bolt to your competitor? Kiss them good-bye. Or do you just want to go to Vegas and have a wild weekend on the spur of the moment? Well, maybe next weekend, instead. Don't you feel so much safer now?"
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9 comments

WTF! (1)

CTU (1844100) | more than 3 years ago | (#33619780)

More BS from the government :( won't stop anything other then legit travel

This is legit - Show Us Your Papers (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33620780)

Here [tsa.gov] it is at the TSA's FAQ page relating to this.
Here is the text of The Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (IRTPA) of 2004 [state.gov] (PDF).

Not having read the full 236 pages of the law, but skimming, I find a lot of language like this:

''(G) APPEAL PROCEDURES.-- ''(ii) RECORDS.--The process shall include the establishment of a method by which the Assistant Secretary will be able to maintain a record of air passengers and other individuals who have been misidentified and have corrected erroneous information. To prevent repeated delays of misidentified passengers and other individuals, the Transportation Security Administration record shall contain information determined by the Assistant Secretary to authenticate the identity of such a passenger or individual.

to prevent multiple false positives on the no-fly list, but the closest I cn find to anything requiring what we are talking about here is:

''(C) ADVANCED AIRLINE PASSENGER PRESCREENING.-- ''(ii) ASSUMPTION OF FUNCTION.--Not later than 180 days after completion of testing under clause (i), the Assistant Secretary, or the designee of the Assistant Secretary, shall begin to assume the performance of the passenger prescreening function of comparing passenger information to the automatic selectee and no fly lists and utilize all appropriate records in the consolidated and integrated terrorist watchlist maintained by the Federal Government in performing that function.

All in all, I think this is pretty monstrous.

Um, check the FAQ: (1)

wbav (223901) | more than 3 years ago | (#33621204)

Q: Can I fly the same day I buy a ticket since I'm required to have SFPD information in my reservation 72 hours prior to departure?
A: Yes, we will collect and transmit the SFPD to the Department of Homeland Security when we ticket your reservation.

So, I don't think it does much good, just a pain in the rear for everyone.

Re:Um, check the FAQ: (1)

tehrhart (1713168) | more than 3 years ago | (#33621712)

A very good point about not being effective. The loss of privacy within the U.S. is appalling, and the modern implementation of requiring documentation to be presented to government agents for domestic travel is just shameful. At least those of in Europe still have a reasonable alternative in the international high-speed train networks. Today, within continental Europe, one can go to your local train station, buy a ticket across the continent without providing any identification and, within the Schengen countries, usually not show any sort of ID during the entire trip.

Aweful (1)

gdilson99 (1903556) | more than 3 years ago | (#33622338)

What a joke, thousands of business people are required to book and travel on the same day. This would hurt the economy badly!!

FALSE (1)

wiredmikey (1824622) | more than 3 years ago | (#33624024)

This is all false information. You can still fly within three days. Squash This.

Re:FALSE (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33624450)

You can fly within three days ONLY IF you buy your ticket within three days. You're still required to provide the information, EITHER WAY. So yeah, TFS is overwrought, but the takeaway is: the government is now monitoring (and recording) INTERNAL travel in the U.S. Did Soviet Russia ever do this to that extent?

U can Fly within 3 days, get facts before you post (1)

wiredmikey (1824622) | more than 3 years ago | (#33624052)

You have no idea what you're talking about. Yes, they require travel information and most have been gathering that info for a while now and you'd know that if you've been on a plane any time recently. But you can still fly anytime, as long as you provide that info to run against the no fly list.

Did you even read the American Airlines link? (1)

Dragon Bait (997809) | more than 3 years ago | (#33625916)

From the link provided in the summary:

If you have reservations for travel on or after November 1, 2010, you need to provide your SFPD at least 72 hours prior to departure. You will not be able to travel without the TSA mandated Secure Flight Passenger Data in your reservation.

(emphasis theirs)

If you have not flown before and you do not already have the information on file then American Airlines really seems to be stating you will not be able to travel within 72 hours. Or do you some how interpret this piece of English differently?

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