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Localizing language in the brain

RogerRoast (1914292) writes | more than 3 years ago

Science 0

RogerRoast (1914292) writes "A new study by MIT scientists pinpoints areas of the brain used exclusively for language, providing a partial answer to a longstanding debate in cognitive science. According to the study, there are parts of our brain dedicated to language and only language.

After having their subjects perform the initial language task, which they call a “functional localizer,” they had each one do a subset of seven other experiments: one on exact arithmetic, two on working memory, three on cognitive control and one on music, since these are the functions “most commonly argued to share neural machinery with language.” The authors say, the results don’t imply that every cognitive function has its own dedicated piece of cortex; after all, we’re able to learn new skills, so there must be some parts of the brain that are both high-level and functionally flexible."

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