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Wounded Copyright Troll Still Alive and Kicking

Hugh Pickens writes (1984118) writes | more than 2 years ago

The Media 0

Hugh Pickens writes writes "Steve Green writes that even as defendents who defeated Righthaven in court and won their attorney’s fees complain they haven’t been paid a total of $216,000 and try to seize Righthaven assets, the copyright troll proved that it is alive and kicking by filing a brief that District Judge James Mahan in Las Vegas was wrong to find an Oregon nonprofit was protected by fair use in posting an entire R-J story on the relationship between immigrants and Las Vegas police. A key factor in Mahan’s decision was that the defendant, the Center for Intercultural Organizing in Portland, couldn’t harm the market for a copyright to the story Righthaven obtained for lawsuit purposes from Stephens Media. Mahan also “found that because the work was a news article, the totality of its content was informational and permissible for productive use by others,” Righthaven's outside attorney Shawn Mangano wrote in his brief that "in reaching this erroneous conclusion, the district court failed to accord any degree of creative effort to the work (story) whatsoever.” In a second appeals brief, Mangano appeared to face an uphill challenge in arguing that Righthaven had standing to sue or should have been allowed to sue after amending its Stephens Media lawsuit contract to fix defects — assertions rejected so far by six Nevada judges. The defendants in the appeals have not yet filed their briefs, and it’s likely to be months before the appeals court hears arguments on the cases."

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