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Intel's liquid CPU cooler: Is water worth the cost

MrSeb (471333) writes | more than 2 years ago

Intel 0

MrSeb writes "When Intel launched its high-end 3960X CPU last month, it also debuted a new liquid cooling solution. Typical boxed Intel CPUs ship with a heatsink+fan, but the company noted that the majority of its enthusiast customers bought third-party solutions. The new liquid cooler — it goes by the inspiring moniker of RTS2011LC — is meant to offer enthusiasts and OEMs an Intel-brand solution they’ll actually use. But is water cooling really necessary? Like its quad-core "Extreme Edition" predecessors, the 3960X still dissipates 130W — and more tellingly, Intel even states that it'll be releasing a sub-$20 air cooler for Sandy Bridge-E and Ivy Bridge-E chips anyway. So is it worth plunking down $85 for the new RTS2011LC? Does it provide the kind of performance that Intel's stereotypical "enthusiast" customers need? ExtremeTech goes hands-on to find out."
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