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No Security At Russian Rocket Plant

theshowmecanuck (703852) writes | more than 2 years ago

3

theshowmecanuck (703852) writes "Reuters reports that there is little or no security at one of the main factories in Russia responsible for military and Soyuz rocket manufacture. Blogger Lana Sator was able to walk right into the empty (off hours) facility through huge gaps in the fences that no-one bothered to repair, and there was no security to stop them aside from some dogs that didn't bother them either. In fact Lana even has one picture of herself posing next to an apparently non-functional security camera, another of her sitting on what looks like to be possibly a partially assembled rocket motor (someone who knows better can fill us in), and has about 100 photos of the escapade all told on her blog about this (it's in Russian... which I don't speak... any translators out there?). Russian officials are said to be deeply concerned. I wonder if this has any bearing on why Russian rockets haven't been making it into space successfully, or whether it and the launch failures are all part of some general industrial malaise that is taking place."

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Translation (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#38553914)

    You don't need a translator, except for the copy of the posted memo. I'm not sure I can get my Russian friends to do it, as it's pretty verbose, and they generally have better things to do. :)

http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=ru&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Flana-sator.livejournal.com%2F160176.html%23cutid1&act=url [google.com]

I haven't read the whole thing yet, but it seems pretty easy to read. "luminosity" is "lights". I believe "parted germodveri" is "open doors" or "broken doors". I'm not reading that from the Russian. I'm just guessing based on the fact that the photo is of an open door. :)

Back to the photo tour with me. It looks interesting, but doesn't look like a huge security threat. I haven't come to anything that shows propellent or explosives. Their biggest risk is probably scrap metal scavengers.

Re:Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38554200)

You don't need access to the explosives to ruin a rocket motor. It wasn't the explosives that made the Challenger explode, it was bad gaskets.

Re:Translation (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#38557128)

    That would be if it was an active plant. I didn't see in the description where it said it was actively used. By the corrosion on so much stuff there, I assumed it wasn't. I'd be afraid to trust any of it. The "newest" thing there appeared to be the new security camera, held on with blue electrical tape. :)

      It looked like leftovers from a decommissioned assembly plant, which there wasn't enough to make an actual rocket.

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