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Study Analyzes Recent Grad's Unemployment by Major

Hugh Pickens writes (1984118) writes | more than 2 years ago

Education 0

Hugh Pickens writes writes "Michelle Singletary writes that a new report from the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce called “Hard Times: College Majors, Unemployment and Earnings: Not All College Degrees Are Created Equal” analyzes unemployment by major and shows that not enough students — and their families who are also taking on student loans — are asking what their college major is worth in the workforce. "Too many students aren’t sure what job they could get after four, five or even six years of studying a certain major and racking up education loans," writes Singletary. "Many aren’t getting on-the-job training while they are in school or during their semester or summer breaks. As a result, questions about employment opportunities or what type of job they have the skills to attain are met with blank stares or the typical, “'I don’t know.'" The reports found that the unemployment rate for recent graduates is highest in architecture (13.9 percent) because of the collapse of the construction and home-building industry and not surprisingly, unemployment rates are generally higher in non-technical majors (PDF), such as the arts (11.1 percent), humanities and liberal arts (9.4 percent), social science (8.9 percent) and law and public policy (8.1 percent). "I wouldn’t want to discourage people from pursuing a career they love, even if the pay isn’t very high. However, that choice should be made with the understanding of which job opportunities might be available and weighing what you can expect to earn annually against the cost of taking on debt to finance your education.""

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