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Air Force foresaw fatal F-22 problems; rejected $100,000 fix as too expensive

McGruber (1417641) writes | about 2 years ago

The Military 0

McGruber (1417641) writes "The Associated Press is reporting that years before F-22 stealth fighter pilots began getting dizzy in the cockpit, before one struggled to breathe as he tried to pull out of a fatal crash, before two more went on the "60 Minutes" television program to say the plane was so unsafe they refused to fly it (http://tech.slashdot.org/story/12/05/06/2054225/some-usaf-pilots-refuse-to-fly-f-22-raptor), a small working group of U.S. Air Force experts knew something was wrong with the prized stealth fighter jet (http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/ap-impact-air-force-experts-foresaw-problems-with-f-22-stealth-fighter-solutions-rejected/2012/09/27/af8dda36-087f-11e2-9eea-333857f6a7bd_story.html)

This working group, called RAW-G, was created in 2002 at the suggestion of Daniel Wyman, then a flight surgeon at Florida’s Tyndall Air Force Base, where the first F-22 squadron was being deployed. Wyman is now a brigadier general and the Air Combat Command surgeon general.

RAW-G proposed a range of solutions by 2005, including adjustments to the flow of oxygen into pilot’s masks. But that key recommendation was rejected by military officials reluctant to add costs to a program that was already well over budget.

Kevin Divers, a former Air Force physiologist who led RAW-G until he left the service in 2007, believes the cost of adjusting the oxygen flow would have added about $100,000 to the cost of each $190 million aircraft."

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