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Blackhole's 'point of no return' found

dsinc (319470) writes | about 2 years ago

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dsinc (319470) writes "Using a continent-spanning telescope, an international team of astronomers has peered to the edge of a black hole at the center of a distant galaxy. For the first time, they have measured the black hole’s “point of no return” — the closest distance that matter can approach before being irretrievably pulled into the black hole.

According to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, a black hole’s mass and spin determine how close material can orbit before becoming unstable and falling in toward the event horizon. The team was able to measure this innermost stable orbit and found that it’s only 5.5 times the size of the black hole’s event horizon. This size suggests that the accretion disk is spinning in the same direction as the black hole.
The observations were made by linking together radio telescopes in Hawaii, Arizona, and California to create a virtual telescope called the Event Horizon Telescope, or EHT. The EHT is capable of seeing details 2,000 times finer than the Hubble Space Telescope."

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Can anyone explain Event Horizon vs Point of No Re (1)

Maow (620678) | about 2 years ago | (#41648215)

According to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, a black hole’s mass and spin determine how close material can orbit before becoming unstable and falling in toward the event horizon.

Can anyone explain this better? How does this instability differ from the ... whatever happens at / beyond the event horizon?

Since I'm here, here is my pet theory on singularity (it's probably stupidly wrong): as gravity slows time, once inside the EH, gravity is so strong that time stops, hence the singularity is never reached.

I'm curious what holes will be poked in my pet theory by someone who actually knows something about the topic.

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