Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Geek Remodel?

Anonymous Coward writes | about 2 years ago

3

An anonymous reader writes "What would you do to 'go geek' if you had a major remodel on your hands? My wife and I are re-modeling my in-law's 3000 sq foot single-level house, and we're both very wired, tech-savvy individuals. We will both have offices, as well as TVs in the bedroom and dining room. My question to the community is: What would you do if you had 10-20,000 to spend for this kind of remodel project? What kind of hardware/firmware would you install? I'd love to have a digital 'command center' to run an LCD wall-calendar for the family, and be able to play my PS3 from anywhere in the house (ie, if everyone wants to watch Netflix while I'm in the middle of some Borderlands). What else have geeks done/planned to do? This is a test run for a much, much nicer house down the road, so don't be overly afraid of cost concerns for really great ideas. We will be taking most of the house down to studs, so don't factor demolition into costs. For culinary-minded geeks, I'd love any ideas you have to surprise my wife with cool kitchen gadgets or designs."

cancel ×

3 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

pfff (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41793965)

Sound like a problem for 1-percenter.

Stuff I've been thinking about... (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 2 years ago | (#41794225)

Some stuff I've been thinking about for my own place, if you do all of them you will blow your budget.

In the kitchen:

Inductive stove - works better than gas, runs on electricity not much more expensive than a regular electric range. Only works with ferrous pots like cast-iron, but cast-iron is one of the best kinds of cooking metal there is so not much of a burden.

Two dishwashers - this may not be popular with the woman, but for a geek it's great. You will hadly ever have to put clean dishes on the shelves, just pull clean dishes out of one and put the dirties into the other, then reverse.

General:

Solar tubes - they are like skylights but with a concentrator instead of a normal window. The Solatube brand seems to be the best because they have a fresnel lens on the collector end to capture more sunlight. A couple of hundred bucks per unit and another couple of hundred bucks to install each unit.

Ducting - don't hardwire any data lines, instead install ducts so that you can pull new cables as needed.

Electrochromic glass - this is the stuff that is opaque white but when you apply a current it turns transparent. Expensive, but nice in certain areas like a "window" between the master bedroom and master shower.

Electric window blinds - these things are way too expensive for the tech that is in them, the chinese really need to get into undercutting this business. But even at the over-priced level they are so nice, especially if you have a lot of windows. One button press to completely darken a room.

LED recessed lighting. Cree (the korean LED manufacturer) makes a line of recessed lighting cans with LEDs they call EcoSmart. They last 30,000 hours. They look at least as good as incadescents, are typically brighter (because incandescents fade in output levels so much faster) and are much more energy efficient. You can find EcoSmart at Home Depot, full price is $50 per fixture, but they frequently go on sale in the $25 ballpark, sometimes even cheaper if the local electric company is doing rebates.

Whole house fan - cheap way to rapidly cool the house in the evening.

Re:Stuff I've been thinking about... (1)

niftymitch (1625721) | about 2 years ago | (#41798089)

Some stuff I've been thinking about for my own place, if you do all of them you will blow your budget.

In the kitchen:

Inductive stove - works better than gas, runs on electricity not much more expensive than a regular electric range. Only works with ferrous pots like cast-iron, but cast-iron is one of the best kinds of cooking metal there is so not much of a burden.

.....snip....

Good list, one quip is that induction is cool (pun intended) and does
require induction ready pots and pans. However cast iron is
not a requirement or the only option. It cooks a lot like a gas flame.
If the kitchen has good vents bulk propane or natural gas
is often a better choice. Induction ready cookware should be
on all of our shopping list. Fire/Building codes have all but
outlawed BBQs in dense living yet a grill pan outside on a portable
high power induction burner will cook a burger or steak to perfection
out on the deck.

We do not know what shape the existing electrical service is
in. In older homes upgrading the electrical service is key.
If you run any wire run data, catv, etc at the same time as
permitted by code.

While looking at wires it makes a lot of sense to put GigE ready
data links and even classic POT phone lines to each wall and
this includes coax for cable.

Earth grounding and lightening rods... Most homes have
less than ideal earthing for the electrical. The more gadgets
the more important earth ground is.

Better zone control for electric to permit solar and
also emergency generation facility to be installed
safely and in a useful way. The further north or south
the home is the more important this might be.

Thermal insulation, roof and window improvements can
add a lot to the feel of a house as can acoustic insulation
on internal walls. Sound management can make a tiny
home feel bigger and calmer.

Optical links... more and more audio video systems
have optical only links.

A data closet.... thicker dry wall, dedicated fire detector,
ventilation for thermal management, dedicated and protected
power.

Fresh air thermal exchange.... (research radon vents). Venting
stagnant air to reduce the buildup of a long list of funky stuff
is a good thing. However vents that move enough air also cause
thermal imbalance. The radon vents have heat exchange so the
incoming and outgoing air swap their thermal load for a near
wash. This assumes that external air is an improvement and
may need a "never mind" switch if you are close to a chemical
plant that tends to issue a "shelter in place warning".

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?