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Ubuntu 13.04 Will Allow Instant Purchasing, Right From The Dash

sfcrazy (1542989) writes | about 2 years ago

Ubuntu 1

sfcrazy (1542989) writes "Ubuntu is becoming a shopping center. Instead of addressing the queries rasied by Stallman and EFF, Canonical is now pushing for making Ubuntu a shopping cart. " With Ubuntu 13.04 Canonical is going one step forward, and soon you will be able to purchase software and music right from the Dash without opening the software center or web browser. This is intended to make the whole experience even more interactive and useful for the end user.""
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Harmless convenience or rotting cancer? (1)

SlashSpam (720086) | about 2 years ago | (#42232479)

I can see how it can be convenient, to be able to order books, CD's, online music, etc. from the core of your desktop. However, what I don't want, is Canonical to depend on you, the users, to buy DRM'ed music, and/or proprietary software.

I have been somewhat worried about the software center offering proprietary software, however, it seems convenient in the cases, where there is no free alternative, or when the free alternative is considerably less convenient than the proprietary version. However, the user should be properly warned, that this is proprietary software, that doesn't respect his or her freedom.

However, the idea that Canonical gets a dime or whatever, when someone uses Ubuntu to buy a new book, doesn't worry me. I wish they would extend their support on free software instead. I am sure people concerned about free software, would be willing to pay for support. We also need Canonical to offer governments, schools and stuff like that a proper alternative to the proprietary stuff, they use today.

If the idea with this thing, however, is merely to go for the money of random GNU/Linux users, who stumble on Ubuntu by coincidence, to buy proprietary software, DRM'ed music, and stuff like that, then it may very well be a cancer in the core GUI of the default Ubuntu install.

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