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Intel Demos Next Gen Haswell GT-3 Graphics and Clover Trail Power Consumption

MojoKid (1002251) writes | about a year and a half ago

Intel 0

MojoKid writes "Representatives from Intel at CES were touting the low power characteristics of their current Clover Trail Atom processors that are featured in a number of Windows 8 tablets. Intel apparently is on a mission to rebut the notion that ARM-based processors are more power efficient. In one demo, Intel wired up a number of sensors to the batteries on a quartet of tablets to monitor power consumption in real-time. Two of the tablets (a Samsung ATIV and Dell XPS 10) were built around Qualcomm Krait-based SoCs, one (a Microsoft Surface RT) featured NVIDIA’s Tegra 3, and there was an Acer W510 built on Intel’s Clover Trail Atom. The demo showed the Tegra 3 Surface RT tablet clearly consuming the most the power, with the Clover Trail and Krait-based systems much more tightly grouped. The Clover Trail-based tablet was consuming the least power within the particular Youtube HD video workload shown. In another demo, Intel had a blind taste test of sorts, with two systems set up side by side, running Dirt 3 in DX11 mode at the same image quality settings. One system featured an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650, while the other was powered by an Intel Haswell-based Core processor with integrated GT-3 graphics. Haswell’s GT-3 graphics engine reportedly offers 2X the performance of Ivy Bridge HD 4000 graphics, along with additional features. In the demo, both machines easily produced smooth frame rates and shared nearly indistinguishable image quality."
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