Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Why the Law Shouldn't Rely on People to Manage their Privacy

privacyprof (860829) writes | about a year ago

0

privacyprof (860829) writes "This short article, Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Dilemma, 126 Harvard Law Review 1880 (2013), argues that the current regulatory approach for protecting privacy relies too heavily on “privacy self-management” – providing people with a set of rights to enable them to decide how to weigh the costs and benefits of the collection, use, or disclosure of their information. Empirical and social science research has undermined key assumptions about how people make decisions regarding their data. People cannot appropriately self-manage their privacy due to a series of structural problems. There are too many entities collecting and using personal data to make it feasible for people to manage their privacy separately with each entity. Moreover, many privacy harms are the result of an aggregation of pieces of data over a period of time by different entities. It is virtually impossible for people to weigh the costs and benefits of revealing information or permitting its use or transfer without an understanding of the potential downstream uses. Privacy self-management addresses privacy in a series of isolated transactions guided by particular individuals. Privacy costs and benefits, however, are more appropriately assessed cumulatively and holistically — not merely at the individual level."
Link to Original Source

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?