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Researcher controls colleague's brain from remote location

vinces99 (2792707) writes | 1 year,22 days

0

vinces99 (2792707) writes "University of Washington researchers have performed what they believe is the first noninvasive human-to-human brain interface, with one researcher able to send a brain signal via the Internet to control the hand motions of a fellow researcher. Using electrical brain recordings and a form of magnetic stimulation, Rajesh Rao sent a brain signal to Andrea Stocco on the other side of the UW campus, causing Stocco's finger to move on a keyboard. The researchers believe this is the first demonstration of human-to-human brain interfacing. Rao looked at a computer screen and played a simple video game with his mind. When he was supposed to fire a cannon at a target, he imagined moving his right hand (but didn't actually move it) to cause a cursor to hit the "fire" button. Almost instantaneously, Stocco, who wore noise-canceling earbuds and wasn't looking at a computer screen, involuntarily moved his right index finger to push the space bar on the keyboard in front of him, as if firing the cannon. Stocco, who jokingly referred to the phenomenon as "the Vulcan mind meld," compared the feeling of his hand moving involuntarily to that of a nervous tic."
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