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Are the NIST standard elliptic curves back-doored?

IamTheRealMike (537420) writes | 1 year,10 days

2

IamTheRealMike (537420) writes "In the wake of Bruce Schneier's statements that he no longer trusts the constants selected for elliptic curve cryptography, people have started trying to reproduce the process that led to those constants being selected ... and found it cannot be done. As background, the most basic standard elliptic curves used for digital signatures and other cryptography are called the SEC random curves (SEC is "Standards for Efficient Cryptography"), a good example being secp256r1. The random numbers in these curve parameters were supposed to be selected via a "verifiably random" process (output of SHA1 on some seed), which is a reasonable way to obtain a nothing up my sleeve number if the input to the hash function is trustworthy, like a small counter or the digits of PI. Unfortunately it turns out the actual inputs used were opaque 256 bit numbers, chosen ad-hoc with no justifications provided. Worse, the curve parameters for SEC were generated by head of elliptic curve research at the NSA — opening the possibility that they were found via a brute force search for a publicly unknown class of weak curves. Although no attack against the selected values are currently known, it's common practice to never use unexplainable magic numbers in cryptography standards, especially when those numbers are being chosen by intelligence agencies. Now that the world received strong confirmation that the much more obscure and less widely used standard Dual_EC_DRBG was in fact an NSA undercover operation, NIST re-opened the confirmed-bad standards for public comment. Unless NIST/the NSA can explain why the random curve seed values are trustworthy, it might be time to re-evaluate all NIST based elliptic curve crypto in general."

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I have Snowden to thank ! (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | 1 year,10 days | (#44817203)

Think of it, if not for Snowden, we wouldn't have discovered so many things that we have, right now, know that are suspicious.

So what ? (1)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | 1 year,10 days | (#44817495)

You know, I mean I agree with you totally with you 200%. But knowing those facts will not change *anything* to the world of NSA, except for Snowden's life. He's a hero nevertheless.

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