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Isaac Asimov's 50-Year-Old Prediction for 2014 Is Viral and All Wrong

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes | about 9 months ago

0

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "So the internet has obviously exalted over noted non-ass Isaac Asimov's vision for 2014, which he articulated in a New York Times opinion piece in 1964. The sci-fi writer imagined visiting the 2014 World Fair, and the global culture and economy the exhibits might reflect. NPR called his many predictions, which range from cordless smart telephones, to robots running our leisure society, to machine-cooked 'automeals', "right on." Business Insider called the forecast "spot on." The Huffington Post called the projections "eerily accurate."

The only thing is, they're not.

Taken as a whole, Asimov's vision for 2014 is wildly off. It's more that 'Genius predicted the future 50 years ago' makes for a great article hook. Asimov does hit a couple pretty close to home: He got pretty close to guessing the world population (6.5 billion); he anticipated automated cars ("vehicles with 'robot brains'"); and he seems to have described the current smartphone/tablet craze ("sight-sound" telephones that "can be used not only to see the people you call but also for studying documents and photographs and reading passages from books.")"

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