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Where Old Hard Disks (with Digital Secrets) Go To Die

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes | about 6 months ago

1

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Justin George writes at McClatchy that in a 20,000-square-foot warehouse, where visitors are required to trade in a driver’s license for a visitor’s badge, some of the nation’s secrets are torn apart, reduced to sand or demagnetized until they are forever silent. Need to destroy a rugged Toughbook laptop that might have been used in war? E-End will use a high-powered magnetic process known as degaussing to erase its hard drive of any memory. A computer monitor that might have some top-secret images left on it? Crushed and ground into recyclable glass. Laser sights for weapons? Torn into tiny shards of metal. “We make things go away,” says Arleen Chafitz, owner and CEO of e-End Secure Data Sanitization and Electronics Recycling, a company with sixteen employees that destroys hard drives, computers, monitors, phones and other sensitive equipment that governments and corporations don’t want in the wrong hands. Chafitz say the information technology departments at typical companies might not have the proper tools or training to adequately dispose of data. IT departments focus on fixing and restoring data, they say, while data-wiping companies focus on just the opposite. E-End’s clients include the Secret Service, L-3 Communications, the French Embassy in Washington, and health care insurers and providers, who worry about losing patient information — and drawing investigations and fines. “We have been pleased with the thoroughness of the work done by e-End,” says Scott Pearce, chief information security officer for Frederick County government. “They actually shred the drives while you watch and provide a certification sheet after the process.”"

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1 comment

Using encryption is the better option (1)

ffkom (3519199) | about 6 months ago | (#46124721)

Using encryption not only saves you effort when the harddisk dies after years, it also provides security benefits during the drives lifetime and makes warranty-exchanges of young defect drives painless.
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