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Government Sent 2,000+ National Security Letters to AT&T in 2013

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes | about 2 months ago

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Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "AT&T, in its first transparency report, said that it received at least 2,000 National Security Letters and nearly 38,000 requests for location data on its subscribers in 2013.

The new report from AT&T is the latest in a growing list of publications from telecom companies, Web providers and cell phone carriers who have been under pressure from privacy advocates and security experts in the wake of the Edward Snowden NSA surveillance revelations. Telecoms had been resistant to providing such information in the past and it’s really only in the last month or so, since the Department of Justice loosened its restrictions on the way that companies can report NSL and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act requests that more companies have come around on the issue.

AT&T’s report shows a higher number of NSLs and subpoenas in 2013 than its most relevant competitor, Verizon. In January, Verizon’s first transparency report showed that the company received between 1,000 and 1,999 NSLs in 2013 and 164,000 subpoenas. AT&T said it got 2,000-2,999 NSLs and 248,343 subpoenas last year. AT&T also received nearly 37,000 court orders and more than 16,000 search warrants."

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